Come Live with Me (1941)

85 mins | Romance | 31 January 1941

Director:

Clarence Brown

Producer:

Clarence Brown

Cinematographer:

George Folsey

Editor:

Frank E. Hull

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The romantic poem recited by "Bill" in the film, was Christopher Marlowe's "Come Live with Me," first published in The Passionate Pilgrim in 1599. This film marked the motion picture debut of actress Adeline de Walt Reynolds. According to M-G-M publicity materials contained in the AMPAS Library file on the film, Reynolds was an Iowa farmer's wife who entered college in her sixties and graduated from the University of California at Berkeley at age seventy. She was discovered by director Clarence Brown in a local theatrical production and continued to act in films and on the stage until her death in 1961. ...

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The romantic poem recited by "Bill" in the film, was Christopher Marlowe's "Come Live with Me," first published in The Passionate Pilgrim in 1599. This film marked the motion picture debut of actress Adeline de Walt Reynolds. According to M-G-M publicity materials contained in the AMPAS Library file on the film, Reynolds was an Iowa farmer's wife who entered college in her sixties and graduated from the University of California at Berkeley at age seventy. She was discovered by director Clarence Brown in a local theatrical production and continued to act in films and on the stage until her death in 1961.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 Feb 1941
---
Daily Variety
23 Jan 1941
---
Film Daily
30 Jan 1941
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 1940
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 1940
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
22 Nov 1940
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 1941
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1941
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
25 Jan 1941
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Jan 1941
p. 39
New York Times
28 Feb 1941
p. 17
Variety
22 Jan 1941
p. 16
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 January 1941
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 29 Jan 1941
Production Date:
7 Oct--30 Nov 1940
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
23 January 1941
LP10217
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85
Length(in feet):
7,761
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6917
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Middle-aged New York publisher Barton Kendrick and his wife Diana have a "modern" marriage in which each allows the other romantic freedom. Diana secretly wishes the situation were different, but Bart revels in his relationship with the beautiful Johnny Jones. Johnny, a Viennese refugee who has been staying illegally in New York since her temporary visa expired, is in love with Bart but won't accept his marriage proposal because she is worried that Diana will be hurt. When immigration official Barney Grogan comes to Johnny's apartment to tell her to report for deportation, he informs her, off the record, that if she marries an American citizen she will not be deported, then gives her a week to find a husband. While Johnny is thinking things over in a diner, she encounters Bill Smith, an aspiring writer who is completely broke. She gets the idea to marry him and invites herself back to his apartment. When she proposes, he is reluctant, but eventually agrees and convinces her to draw up a contract whereby she will pay him $17.80 each week. Two months later, Bill has fallen in love with Johnny. Meanwhile, Bart knows that Johnny has been granted residency, but she won't tell him how. One night, when Bart proposes and says that his divorce can be arranged in six weeks, she confesses that she is married. She then goes to see Bill a day early, and he shows her his novel based on their marriage, Without Love . She is touched, but wants him to give her a divorce right away, and tells him that she loves someone else. Though ...

More Less

Middle-aged New York publisher Barton Kendrick and his wife Diana have a "modern" marriage in which each allows the other romantic freedom. Diana secretly wishes the situation were different, but Bart revels in his relationship with the beautiful Johnny Jones. Johnny, a Viennese refugee who has been staying illegally in New York since her temporary visa expired, is in love with Bart but won't accept his marriage proposal because she is worried that Diana will be hurt. When immigration official Barney Grogan comes to Johnny's apartment to tell her to report for deportation, he informs her, off the record, that if she marries an American citizen she will not be deported, then gives her a week to find a husband. While Johnny is thinking things over in a diner, she encounters Bill Smith, an aspiring writer who is completely broke. She gets the idea to marry him and invites herself back to his apartment. When she proposes, he is reluctant, but eventually agrees and convinces her to draw up a contract whereby she will pay him $17.80 each week. Two months later, Bill has fallen in love with Johnny. Meanwhile, Bart knows that Johnny has been granted residency, but she won't tell him how. One night, when Bart proposes and says that his divorce can be arranged in six weeks, she confesses that she is married. She then goes to see Bill a day early, and he shows her his novel based on their marriage, Without Love . She is touched, but wants him to give her a divorce right away, and tells him that she loves someone else. Though heartbroken, he agrees to the divorce. After some revisions, Bill sends his unfinished novel to some publishers, one of whom is Bart. Diana, who reads all of Bart's submissions, calls Bart to tell him about the wonderful new writer she has discovered, and when he reads the unlikely plot, Bart finds it too familiar. He then invites Bill to his office, and as he staunchly defends the "older man" in Bill's story, Diana realizes that Bart is the real older man. She convinces Bart to give Bill a $500 advance, and Bill thinks that he now has a chance with Johnny. Diana then tells Bart that she will give him a divorce as soon as Bart is convinced that Johnny really loves him and not Bill. Bill goes to see Johnny to repay her and tells her that before he agrees to a divorce, they must take a trip together. After leaving New York, they stop at a roadside restaurant, where she secretly calls Bart, who promises to come for her right away. They then drive to a farm owned by Bill's kindly grandmother. Later that night, while staying in rooms divided by a three-quarter wall, neither Bill or Johnny can get to sleep. After Bill tells Johnny how fireflies show their love and recites a romantic poem, she falls in love and turns her flashlight on and off like a firefly. Just then Bart arrives, and Bill soon realizes that Bart is his romantic rival. The men argue, but after Bill goes to his room, Johnny sends away Bart, who finally realizes that he still loves Diana. When Johnny goes upstairs, she flashes the light again and they kiss over the wall that bears one of Grandma's Shakespeare-quoting samplers, "All's well that ends well."

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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