Dr. Kildare's Wedding Day (1941)

82 or 84 mins | Drama | 22 August 1941

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HISTORY

The "Tableau Rose (Cornelia's Symphony)" played in the film was written by series co-star Lionel Barrymore, who wrote several classical compositions that were performed by symphony orchestras. This was the last of the Dr. Kildare series to feature Laraine Day in the role of "Nurse Mary Lamont." According to reviews and news items, M-G-M decided to write Day out of the series because her career was advancing and the studio wished to have her free to do other films. A HR news item in Mar 1941 noted that Ormond Ruthven, who is credited onscreen as one of four screenwriters, was a member of M-G-M's recorded sound department, and had just sold "an original" to the studio for their next Dr. Kildare picture.
       Red Skelton made his second and last appearance in the series as orderly "Vernon Briggs." Skelton also went on to starring roles at M-G-M after leaving the series. Actor Nils Asther, who had been under contract to M-G-M in the 1920s and early 1930s, returned to the studio for the first time in seven years, according to publicity materials. For additional information on the Dr. Kildare series, consult the Series Index and see the entry for Young Dr. Kildare ( AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

The "Tableau Rose (Cornelia's Symphony)" played in the film was written by series co-star Lionel Barrymore, who wrote several classical compositions that were performed by symphony orchestras. This was the last of the Dr. Kildare series to feature Laraine Day in the role of "Nurse Mary Lamont." According to reviews and news items, M-G-M decided to write Day out of the series because her career was advancing and the studio wished to have her free to do other films. A HR news item in Mar 1941 noted that Ormond Ruthven, who is credited onscreen as one of four screenwriters, was a member of M-G-M's recorded sound department, and had just sold "an original" to the studio for their next Dr. Kildare picture.
       Red Skelton made his second and last appearance in the series as orderly "Vernon Briggs." Skelton also went on to starring roles at M-G-M after leaving the series. Actor Nils Asther, who had been under contract to M-G-M in the 1920s and early 1930s, returned to the studio for the first time in seven years, according to publicity materials. For additional information on the Dr. Kildare series, consult the Series Index and see the entry for Young Dr. Kildare ( AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.5251). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Aug 1941.
---
Daily Variety
15 Aug 1941.
---
Film Daily
19 Aug 41
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 41
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 41
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 41
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 41
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Aug 1941.
---
New York Times
18 Sep 41
p. 31.
New Yorker
27 Sep 1941.
---
The Exhibitor
3 Sep 1941.
---
Variety
20 Aug 41
p. 9.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
MAKEUP
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Max Brand.
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"Tableau Rose" (Symphonic Suite) by Lionel Barrymore.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
22 August 1941
Production Date:
2 June--23 June 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 August 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10668
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82 or 84
Length(in feet):
7,437
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7506
SYNOPSIS

Staff members at New York's Blair General Hospital happily prepare for the marriage of resident doctor James Kildare to nurse Mary Lamont. Dr. Leonard Gillespie, Jimmy's wheelchair-bound mentor, is happy for his protégé, but at loose ends because the marriage will mean that Jimmy will have less time to spend with him. Trying to find something to do, Gillespie goes to a concert and observes that the conductor, maestro Constanzo Labardi seems to be faltering. When a mutual friend introduces Gillespie to the conductor, Gillespie suggests that the maestro see a doctor. The next day, Labardi goes to see Gillespie and confesses that he is going deaf, but no one knows his secret. Hoping to cure Labardi, Gillespie, who may have cancer, refuses to accompany cancer specialist Dr. Lockberg to his clinic. While Jimmy and Mary attend a wedding rehearsal at his parents' home in Connecticut, Dr. Lockberg calls Jimmy and asks him to use his influence on Gillespie. Jimmy returns to Blair and convinces Gillespie to go to Lockberg's clinic by threatening not to take his own honeymoon. For the next few days, while Jimmy works with Gillespie on the Labardi case, Mary makes wedding preparations at the Kildares' home. Jimmy is still too busy to attend his bachelor dinner, so Mary, who does not want to disappoint his friends, decides to go in his place. On the way to the restaurant, as she daydreams about her marriage, she accidentally walks into the street and is run over by a truck. When Jimmy arrives at the hospital, he is told about Mary and rushes to her room moments before she ... +


Staff members at New York's Blair General Hospital happily prepare for the marriage of resident doctor James Kildare to nurse Mary Lamont. Dr. Leonard Gillespie, Jimmy's wheelchair-bound mentor, is happy for his protégé, but at loose ends because the marriage will mean that Jimmy will have less time to spend with him. Trying to find something to do, Gillespie goes to a concert and observes that the conductor, maestro Constanzo Labardi seems to be faltering. When a mutual friend introduces Gillespie to the conductor, Gillespie suggests that the maestro see a doctor. The next day, Labardi goes to see Gillespie and confesses that he is going deaf, but no one knows his secret. Hoping to cure Labardi, Gillespie, who may have cancer, refuses to accompany cancer specialist Dr. Lockberg to his clinic. While Jimmy and Mary attend a wedding rehearsal at his parents' home in Connecticut, Dr. Lockberg calls Jimmy and asks him to use his influence on Gillespie. Jimmy returns to Blair and convinces Gillespie to go to Lockberg's clinic by threatening not to take his own honeymoon. For the next few days, while Jimmy works with Gillespie on the Labardi case, Mary makes wedding preparations at the Kildares' home. Jimmy is still too busy to attend his bachelor dinner, so Mary, who does not want to disappoint his friends, decides to go in his place. On the way to the restaurant, as she daydreams about her marriage, she accidentally walks into the street and is run over by a truck. When Jimmy arrives at the hospital, he is told about Mary and rushes to her room moments before she dies. One month later, Gillespie is is ready to leave Lockberg's clinic and receives a call from Jimmy's father, Dr. Stephen Kildare, who tells him that Jimmy has not returned to Blair and has fallen apart after Mary's death. Gillespie asks him to relay a message to Jimmy to meet him so that they can talk about Labardi. At Gillespie's childhood home, he tells Jimmy the story of a composer named Cornelia, whom he loved many years ago, before her death. Dr. Walter Reed, the physician who discovered a cure for yellow fever, inspired Gillespie to go on with his career instead of living only for his grief. Jimmy still thinks that he cannot continue, but he agrees to come back to Blair for one week to help cure Labardi. Jimmy soon discovers that Labardi's hearing problems are caused by a Vitamin B1 deficiency, and after injections of the vitamin, the conductor is able to perform a symphony written by Cornelia on the first of his planned series of radio broadcasts intended to bring great music to the common man. After the concert, Jimmy finally realizes that he must return to medicine. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.