Double Trouble (1941)

63 mins | Comedy | 21 November 1941

Director:

William West

Writer:

Jack Natteford

Producer:

Dixon R. Harwin

Cinematographer:

Arthur Martinelli

Editor:

Carl Pierson

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Here We Go Again. ...

More Less

The working title of this film was Here We Go Again.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Nov 1941
---
Daily Variety
8 Nov 1941
---
Film Daily
17 Nov 1941
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 1941
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 1941
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
10 Nov 1941
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Nov 1941
p. 363
The Exhibitor
26 Nov 1941
p. 896
Variety
10 Nov 1941
---
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Here We Go Again
Release Date:
21 November 1941
Production Date:
early Oct 1941
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Monogram Pictures Corp.
21 November 1941
LP10915
Duration(in mins):
63
Length(in feet):
5,633
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Wealthy canned bean manufacturers Mr. and Mrs. John Whitmore, having agreed to open their home to a pair of English war refugees, are stunned to discover that their wards, Albert and Alfred Prattle, are not children, but middle-aged men. Nevertheless, they take the brothers in and give them jobs in their cannery. When Sparky Marshall, the company's advertising manager, comes up with the idea of using a famous diamond bracelet, worth $100,000, in a promotional scheme, Whitmore agrees to rent the bracelet for a photo session. During the session, a man named Kimble, who is trying to sabotage Whitmore's business, throws the bracelet into the garbage can, where the brothers discover it. Hoping to impress one of the factory girls, Albert puts the bracelet in a marked, empty can and sends it down the assembly line, but his gift is undetected, and the jewelry-filled can is processed with all the others. When Albert tells Sparky what has happened, Sparky sees an opportunity for publicity, and the company announces a $100,000 reward for whoever finds the bracelet. Bean sales skyrocket, but Whitmore's competitors obtain a court order to close his factory unless it can be proved that the canned gems promotion is not a hoax. Albert and Alfred set off in search of the marked can, which they believe was sent to a restaurant on the waterfront. Disguising themselves as waitresses, the brothers infiltrate the restaurant and find the bracelet, and Sparky wins the love of Whitmore's daughter ...

More Less

Wealthy canned bean manufacturers Mr. and Mrs. John Whitmore, having agreed to open their home to a pair of English war refugees, are stunned to discover that their wards, Albert and Alfred Prattle, are not children, but middle-aged men. Nevertheless, they take the brothers in and give them jobs in their cannery. When Sparky Marshall, the company's advertising manager, comes up with the idea of using a famous diamond bracelet, worth $100,000, in a promotional scheme, Whitmore agrees to rent the bracelet for a photo session. During the session, a man named Kimble, who is trying to sabotage Whitmore's business, throws the bracelet into the garbage can, where the brothers discover it. Hoping to impress one of the factory girls, Albert puts the bracelet in a marked, empty can and sends it down the assembly line, but his gift is undetected, and the jewelry-filled can is processed with all the others. When Albert tells Sparky what has happened, Sparky sees an opportunity for publicity, and the company announces a $100,000 reward for whoever finds the bracelet. Bean sales skyrocket, but Whitmore's competitors obtain a court order to close his factory unless it can be proved that the canned gems promotion is not a hoax. Albert and Alfred set off in search of the marked can, which they believe was sent to a restaurant on the waterfront. Disguising themselves as waitresses, the brothers infiltrate the restaurant and find the bracelet, and Sparky wins the love of Whitmore's daughter Peggy.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Night Moves

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Matt Stepanski, a student at ... >>

Stagecoach

The American folk songs adapted for the score included the traditional ballads "Lily Dale," "Rosa Lee," "Joe Bowers," "Joe the Wrangler," "She's More to Be Pitied Than Censured," "She ... >>

The Hurricane

Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall's novel was serialized in The Saturday Evening Post (28 Dec 1935--1 Feb 1936). A 5 Dec 1935 HR ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.