Her First Beau (1941)

76-77 mins | Comedy-drama | 8 May 1941

Director:

Jay Theodore Reed

Producer:

B. B. Kahane

Cinematographer:

George Meehan

Editor:

Charles Nelson

Production Designers:

Lionel Banks, Jerome Pycha Jr.

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was June Mad . Florence Ryerson's and Colin Clements' play was based on their 1930 novel This Awful Age . According to a pre-production news item in HR , Bonita Granville was tested for the role of "Penny Wood." Another HR news item notes that Columbia borrowed director Ted Reed from Paramount, where he had previously directed Jackie Cooper, also on loan from Paramount, in three pictures of this type. Jane Withers was borrowed from Twentieth Century-Fox to appear in this film. Locations were filmed at Sherwood Lake, CA, according to a HR news item. Jane Withers and Jackie Cooper reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 27 Oct ... More Less

The working title of this film was June Mad . Florence Ryerson's and Colin Clements' play was based on their 1930 novel This Awful Age . According to a pre-production news item in HR , Bonita Granville was tested for the role of "Penny Wood." Another HR news item notes that Columbia borrowed director Ted Reed from Paramount, where he had previously directed Jackie Cooper, also on loan from Paramount, in three pictures of this type. Jane Withers was borrowed from Twentieth Century-Fox to appear in this film. Locations were filmed at Sherwood Lake, CA, according to a HR news item. Jane Withers and Jackie Cooper reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 27 Oct 1941. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
10 May 1941.
---
Daily Variety
2 May 1941.
---
Film Daily
11 Jun 41
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Nov 40
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 40
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jan 41
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 May 41
p. 122.
Variety
7 May 41
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play June Mad by Florence Ryerson and Colin Clements (copyrighted 7 Mar 1939), which was based on their novel This Awful Age (New York, 1930).
SONGS
"This Is Love," music by Harry Akst, lyrics by Lew Brown.
COMPOSERS
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
June Mad
Release Date:
8 May 1941
Production Date:
3 February--6 March 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 May 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10753
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76-77
Length(in feet):
6,918
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7222
SYNOPSIS

Fifteen-year-old Penny Wood is helping her neighbor, Chuck Harris, build a glider at the home of Elmer Tuttle, the Woods's handyman. Mrs. Wood, meanwhile, is busily planning a party to welcome her younger brother, Mervyn Roberts, home from college. Mrs. Wood, who worries that her daughter is more interested in becoming a writer than in dating boys, buys Penny a new dress for the party. Mr. Harris harbors concerns about his son, who wishes to become a mechanical engineer rather than a lawyer like his father. When Mervyn arrives home, accompanied by his wordly roommate, Roger Van Vleck, Roger, who fancies himself a ladies' man, begins to flirt with Penny. Smitten with Roger, Penny wears her party dress to dinner that night. The next evening, while Roger serenades Penny, she broaches the topic of marriage, much to his chagrin. The next day, Julie Harris, Chuck's older sister and the object of Mervyn's affection, arrives home from college, and Roger transfers his attentions to her. When Elmer warns Chuck that Mr. Woods is planning a visit to the Tuttle house, Chuck, who is hiding his creation from his father, enlists Penny's help in moving the glider to a neighbor's vacant garage. As they slip the glider into the garage, Penny hears Roger singing to Julie. Planning to fly the glider over the lake the next day, Chuck gives Elmer fifteen dollars to rent a boat to tow the glider in case it lands in the lake. When Penny learns about the money, she begs Chuck to lend it to her so that she can buy a new dress for the party. ... +


Fifteen-year-old Penny Wood is helping her neighbor, Chuck Harris, build a glider at the home of Elmer Tuttle, the Woods's handyman. Mrs. Wood, meanwhile, is busily planning a party to welcome her younger brother, Mervyn Roberts, home from college. Mrs. Wood, who worries that her daughter is more interested in becoming a writer than in dating boys, buys Penny a new dress for the party. Mr. Harris harbors concerns about his son, who wishes to become a mechanical engineer rather than a lawyer like his father. When Mervyn arrives home, accompanied by his wordly roommate, Roger Van Vleck, Roger, who fancies himself a ladies' man, begins to flirt with Penny. Smitten with Roger, Penny wears her party dress to dinner that night. The next evening, while Roger serenades Penny, she broaches the topic of marriage, much to his chagrin. The next day, Julie Harris, Chuck's older sister and the object of Mervyn's affection, arrives home from college, and Roger transfers his attentions to her. When Elmer warns Chuck that Mr. Woods is planning a visit to the Tuttle house, Chuck, who is hiding his creation from his father, enlists Penny's help in moving the glider to a neighbor's vacant garage. As they slip the glider into the garage, Penny hears Roger singing to Julie. Planning to fly the glider over the lake the next day, Chuck gives Elmer fifteen dollars to rent a boat to tow the glider in case it lands in the lake. When Penny learns about the money, she begs Chuck to lend it to her so that she can buy a new dress for the party. Chuck initially refuses, but when Penny bursts into tears, he gives her the money. After sending Elmer to purchase the dress for her, Penny presents Roger with a love poem. That night, dressed in her new strapless red dress and wearing too much makeup, Penny descends the staircase. When Mrs. Wood sees her daughter, she is shocked, but consents to Penny's wishes to enter the party dressed in her new finery. Greeted by rude remarks and derisive comments about her appearance, Penny runs back to her mother, who advises that she remove her makeup and wear her new jacket over the dress. While the crowd is preoccupied with Penny's appearance, Elmer and Chuck pull the glider from the garage and are seen by Mr. Harris, who angrily berates his son. Dr. Wood intervenes, however, and suggests that they discuss the issue after the party. Determined to fly his glider at any cost, Chuck decides to test it that night. Back at the party, Penny overhears Julie and Roger laughing at her love poem. When Penny bursts into tears, Mervyn tries to comfort her and presents her with the corsage he bought for Julie. At the lake, Chuck successfully launches his glider, but when Elmer is unable to spot him in the night sky, he returns to the party, alarmed. Mr. Harris and Dr. Wood immediately rush to the lake to search for Chuck, and when Mervyn offers to drive Julie there, she walks out on Roger. Bereft of female companionship, Roger tries to make up with Penny, but she is too concerned about Chuck to respond to his overtures. Meanwhile, at the lake, Chuck, soaring overhead, sees the search party looking for him. Distracted by his father's calls, Chuck crashes into a tree and smashes his glider. Impressed by his son's perserverance and ingenuity, Mr. Harris offers to help him build a new glider. When Chuck returns to the Woods's house, Penny is so worried about him that she slaps him in anger, and he responds by kissing her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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