Honeymoon for Three (1941)

63 mins | Comedy | 18 January 1941

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Writer:

Earl Baldwin

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

Rudi Fehr

Production Designer:

Max Parker

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

A 14 May 1940 HR news item noted that Fred MacMurray and Olivia deHavilland were to star in the film at one time. Allan Scott and George Haight's play was previously adapted for the film Goodbye Again by Warner Bros. in 1933. That film was directed by Michael Curtiz and starred Warren William and Joan Blondell (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.1682). ...

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A 14 May 1940 HR news item noted that Fred MacMurray and Olivia deHavilland were to star in the film at one time. Allan Scott and George Haight's play was previously adapted for the film Goodbye Again by Warner Bros. in 1933. That film was directed by Michael Curtiz and starred Warren William and Joan Blondell (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.1682).

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Jan 1941
---
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1941
---
Film Daily
10 Feb 1941
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1940
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 1941
p. 11
Motion Picture Herald
25 Jan 1941
---
New York Times
8 Feb 1941
p. 19
Variety
12 Feb 1941
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
Jack L. Warner in charge of production
A Warner Bros.-- First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Addl dial
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Ernie Haller
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
H. Roemheld
Mus
Orch arr
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Goodbye Again by Allan Scott and George Haight (New York, 28 Dec 1932).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Release Date:
18 January 1941
Production Date:
mid Jul--mid Aug 1940
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
4 January 1941
LP10180
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6557
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In Cleveland, Ohio, on a book tour with his efficient secretary, Anne Rogers, with whom he is in love, author Kenneth Bixby is surprised by the delivery of a bouquet. The card enclosed with the flowers is signed "Miriam" which is also the title of Bixby's latest book. Later he receives a telegram, also signed "Miriam." The mystery is deciphered when a young woman named Julie Wilson sneaks into Bixby's hotel room and passionately throws her arms around him. Although Bixby does not remember her, Julie reminds him that they were college sweethearts. Despite her marriage to Harvey Wilson, she has treasured the memory of their relationship and, assuming that Bixby has done the same, is convinced that she was the model for the character of Miriam. Charmed by her evident ardor, Bixby agrees to have breakfast with her. Their presence together is noted by Elizabeth Clochessy, Julie's cousin, who has followed her to Bixby's hotel. Elizabeth is engaged to aspiring lawyer Arthur Westlake and is concerned that Julie's infatuation might cause a damaging scandal. Determined to prevent this, Elizabeth and Arthur try to enlist Anne in their plan to exhaust Bixby so thoroughly that he will not have time for Julie's romantic schemes. Bixby has other plans, though, and dictates a letter to Anne canceling all his appointments and explaining that he intends to talk Julie out of her fantasy. Soon after Bixby departs to meet Julie, her husband Harvey knocks on the door of Bixby's room. He insists on waiting until Bixby returns, wanting only, as he says, to get a look at Bixby after years of hearing ...

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In Cleveland, Ohio, on a book tour with his efficient secretary, Anne Rogers, with whom he is in love, author Kenneth Bixby is surprised by the delivery of a bouquet. The card enclosed with the flowers is signed "Miriam" which is also the title of Bixby's latest book. Later he receives a telegram, also signed "Miriam." The mystery is deciphered when a young woman named Julie Wilson sneaks into Bixby's hotel room and passionately throws her arms around him. Although Bixby does not remember her, Julie reminds him that they were college sweethearts. Despite her marriage to Harvey Wilson, she has treasured the memory of their relationship and, assuming that Bixby has done the same, is convinced that she was the model for the character of Miriam. Charmed by her evident ardor, Bixby agrees to have breakfast with her. Their presence together is noted by Elizabeth Clochessy, Julie's cousin, who has followed her to Bixby's hotel. Elizabeth is engaged to aspiring lawyer Arthur Westlake and is concerned that Julie's infatuation might cause a damaging scandal. Determined to prevent this, Elizabeth and Arthur try to enlist Anne in their plan to exhaust Bixby so thoroughly that he will not have time for Julie's romantic schemes. Bixby has other plans, though, and dictates a letter to Anne canceling all his appointments and explaining that he intends to talk Julie out of her fantasy. Soon after Bixby departs to meet Julie, her husband Harvey knocks on the door of Bixby's room. He insists on waiting until Bixby returns, wanting only, as he says, to get a look at Bixby after years of hearing about his virtues from his wife. Anne and Harvey eventually tire of waiting and go dancing. They are joined by Elizabeth and Arthur who report that Julie and Bixby have disappeared. Although Harvey is completely unconcerned, the other three convince him to drive to the Wilson farm, where they believe the missing pair have gone. Bixby and Julie are not at the farm, however, having lost their way. After one of their tires has a flat, the pair walk to the nearest inn for dinner. By coincidence, Harvey and the others stop at the same inn. On the way inside, they encounter Bixby, who tries unsuccessfully to convince them to return to town with him. Anne refuses, and Bixby shuttles back and forth between the larger group and Julie until he slips on a rug, thus revealing his ruse. Back at the hotel, Anne and Bixby quarrel, and matters become worse when Bixby learns he has been named corespondent in the Wilson divorce. Disgusted, Anne quits her job and breaks their engagement. The next morning, Harvey, who is glad to get rid of his wife, agrees to dismiss his request for damages if Bixby will marry Julie. It appears that Bixby will be forced to accept the arrangement until Anne, spotting a woman who named her baby after Bixby, pretends that he is actually the father of the baby. Bixby goes along with the ploy, adding that "Miriam" was modeled on the baby's mother. This false confession finally ends Julie's infatuation. After Bixby pretends to jump in despair from the building, Anne admits that she loves him and they are reconciled.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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