Lady from Louisiana (1941)

82 mins | Drama | 22 April 1941

Director:

Bernard Vorhaus

Cinematographer:

Jack Marta

Editor:

Edward Mann

Production Designer:

John Victor Mackay

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Lady from New Orleans and Lady of New Orleans . Although a HR news item asserted that the film was the "most postponed picture in Republic's history," after having been on and off the studio's production schedule for three years, other news items indicate that pre-production on the film began in mid-to-late 1939. In May 1939, HR announced that Republic had purchased a novel entitled The Lady from New Orleans , written by Beth Brown, but it does not appear to have been the basis for this picture. Among the writers listed by HR as working on the screenplay in 1939 were Jan Fortune, Joseph Moncure March and Garrett Fort, but their contribution to the completed film has not been confirmed. HR news items also noted that Sol C. Siegel and Armand Schaefer were set at various times to produce the picture, and that Heinie Conklin was to be included in the cast, although Conklin's participation in the finished picture has not been confirmed. DV reported that Ray Middleton was to sing a song in the picture, although he did not. DV also reported that "femme barker" Peggy Lynn was to make her film debut, but her participation in the completed picture has not been ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Lady from New Orleans and Lady of New Orleans . Although a HR news item asserted that the film was the "most postponed picture in Republic's history," after having been on and off the studio's production schedule for three years, other news items indicate that pre-production on the film began in mid-to-late 1939. In May 1939, HR announced that Republic had purchased a novel entitled The Lady from New Orleans , written by Beth Brown, but it does not appear to have been the basis for this picture. Among the writers listed by HR as working on the screenplay in 1939 were Jan Fortune, Joseph Moncure March and Garrett Fort, but their contribution to the completed film has not been confirmed. HR news items also noted that Sol C. Siegel and Armand Schaefer were set at various times to produce the picture, and that Heinie Conklin was to be included in the cast, although Conklin's participation in the finished picture has not been confirmed. DV reported that Ray Middleton was to sing a song in the picture, although he did not. DV also reported that "femme barker" Peggy Lynn was to make her film debut, but her participation in the completed picture has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 May 1941.
---
Daily Variety
12 Mar 41
p. 7.
Daily Variety
19 May 41
p. 3.
Film Daily
30 Apr 41
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
8 May 39
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 39
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 39
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 40
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 40
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 41
p. 27.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 41
p. 3, 6
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 41
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 41
p 4.
Motion Picture Daily
30 Apr 1941.
---
Motion Picture Herald
3 May 41
p. 40.
New York Times
15 May 41
p. 27.
Variety
21 May 41
p. 18.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Lady of New Orleans
Lady from New Orleans
Release Date:
22 April 1941
Production Date:
3 March--late March 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
22 April 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10455
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82
Length(in feet):
7,418
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7207
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When New England lawyer John Reynolds travels by steamboat to New Orleans in the late 1800s, he falls in love with Julie Mirbeau, whose name he does not learn until they reach the dock. Julie is greeted by her father, General Anatole Mirbeau, and his right-hand man, Blackburn "Blackie" Williams. John is met by reformer Blanche Brunot, who has hired him to stop Mirbeau's lottery and its resultant corruption. Although the lovers are dismayed to learn that they are on opposite sides of the issue, they meet later that night to celebrate Mardi Gras. They attend the lottery drawing, which is won by one of John's new acquaintances, restaurateur Gaston. The lottery appears legitimate, and before they part, Julie becomes convinced that John will support her father. Later that night, however, John searches for Gaston, who has been forced by Blackie's thugs to go to the notorious Parisian Palace in Frenchtown and gamble away his winnings. Learning that John is searching the area, the men murder Gaston to keep him quiet. The next day, John arrives at the Mirbeau house to discuss Julie with the general, but when Mirbeau assumes that John will now come to work for him for Julie's sake, John announces that he will investigate the connection between Gaston's murder and the lottery. Furious at John's accusations, Julie tells him that their relationship is over. Soon after, Mirbeau genially fires Blackie, who has been covertly collecting protection money from the Frenchtown businesses and embezzling lottery profits intended for Mirbeau's various charities. Determined to regain control of the lottery, Blackie hires fighter Cuffy Brown, who shoots and kills Mirbeau ... +


When New England lawyer John Reynolds travels by steamboat to New Orleans in the late 1800s, he falls in love with Julie Mirbeau, whose name he does not learn until they reach the dock. Julie is greeted by her father, General Anatole Mirbeau, and his right-hand man, Blackburn "Blackie" Williams. John is met by reformer Blanche Brunot, who has hired him to stop Mirbeau's lottery and its resultant corruption. Although the lovers are dismayed to learn that they are on opposite sides of the issue, they meet later that night to celebrate Mardi Gras. They attend the lottery drawing, which is won by one of John's new acquaintances, restaurateur Gaston. The lottery appears legitimate, and before they part, Julie becomes convinced that John will support her father. Later that night, however, John searches for Gaston, who has been forced by Blackie's thugs to go to the notorious Parisian Palace in Frenchtown and gamble away his winnings. Learning that John is searching the area, the men murder Gaston to keep him quiet. The next day, John arrives at the Mirbeau house to discuss Julie with the general, but when Mirbeau assumes that John will now come to work for him for Julie's sake, John announces that he will investigate the connection between Gaston's murder and the lottery. Furious at John's accusations, Julie tells him that their relationship is over. Soon after, Mirbeau genially fires Blackie, who has been covertly collecting protection money from the Frenchtown businesses and embezzling lottery profits intended for Mirbeau's various charities. Determined to regain control of the lottery, Blackie hires fighter Cuffy Brown, who shoots and kills Mirbeau during a reform league demonstration, thereby making it seem as if one of the reformers is responsible. When John, who has been appointed special city attorney, comes to Julie to pay his respects, she accuses him of indirectly causing her father's death, and determines to keep the lottery going strong. Blackie steps up the seamier sides of the business, although Julie remains ignorant of what she is protecting when she influences various political figures to favor the lottery over the reformers. John is stymied in his efforts to expose the protective racket until he and Blanche steal the records of the lottery's bribes to high officials. That same night, Julie goes to warn Blackie, to whom she has become engaged, about the theft and finds him in the Parisian Palace embracing Pearl, the owner. As John and the police arrive, the extent of Blackie's corruption and his participation in her father's death become clear to Julie, and she tries to testify against the lottery when John brings the case to trial. The trial is interrupted, however, when a rainstorm sweeps through the area, and the levee, which was to have been cared for by the Mirbeau charities, breaks. The courthouse is destroyed, and in the ensuing chaos, John pursues Blackie onto a steamboat while Julie and Blanche try to find shelter on a nearby rooftop. During a fight, John knocks Blackie into the water, then orders the steamboat captain to block the hole in the levee with the boat. The plan works and the flooding is stopped. Later, Blanche and her friends wave goodbye as John and Julie leave for their honeymoon. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.