Maisie Was a Lady (1941)

76 or 78-79 mins | Comedy-drama | 10 January 1941

Director:

Edwin L. Marin

Producer:

J. Walter Ruben

Cinematographer:

Charles Lawton

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

A HR production chart lists Rita Johnson and Henry O'Neill in the cast, but they did not appear in the released film. The CBCS erroneously lists the surname of the family as "Bigelow" instead of "Rawlston," and lists "Diana's" surname as "Winters" instead of "Webley." Reviews noted that this was the first of the "Maisie" films in which the title character was involved in a serious romantic relationship at the end of the film. This was also the first film in the series not based on a novel or story by Wilson Collison. On 24 Nov 1941, Ann Sothern, Lew Ayres and Maureen O'Sullivan recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the film. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and the entry for Maisie (1939) in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

A HR production chart lists Rita Johnson and Henry O'Neill in the cast, but they did not appear in the released film. The CBCS erroneously lists the surname of the family as "Bigelow" instead of "Rawlston," and lists "Diana's" surname as "Winters" instead of "Webley." Reviews noted that this was the first of the "Maisie" films in which the title character was involved in a serious romantic relationship at the end of the film. This was also the first film in the series not based on a novel or story by Wilson Collison. On 24 Nov 1941, Ann Sothern, Lew Ayres and Maureen O'Sullivan recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the film. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and the entry for Maisie (1939) in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2662. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Feb 41
p. 65.
Box Office
11-Jan-41
---
Daily Variety
6 Jan 1941.
---
Film Daily
5 Feb 41
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 40
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 40
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jan 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
8 Jan 1941.
---
Motion Picture Herald
11 Jan 1941.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Mar 41
p. 85.
New York Times
13 Feb 41
p. 25.
Variety
15 Jan 41
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Assoc
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Wilson Collison.
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
10 January 1941
Production Date:
mid October--13 November 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 January 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10165
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76 or 78-79
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When drunken millionaire Bob Rawlston causes Maisie Ravier to ruin her carnival sideshow act, she is fired. Later, Bob lets the furious Maisie have his car to drive back to New York City. On the way, she is stopped by a motorcycle cop who recognizes the car and, thinking she has stolen it, takes her to jail. The next day, Bob cannot remember the previous night and refuses to press charges. As Maisie has been verbally abusive to the policeman and has no money or job, the judge threatens to throw her in jail, until a remorseful Bob admits that Maisie's version of the story is probably correct. The judge then orders Bob to employ Maisie for $25 a week for two months. Bob takes her to his family estate and hires her as a maid, impressing Maisie with his kindness. The head butler, Walpole, takes Maisie under his wing and tries to show her how to dress and act properly. The house is filled with guests, as Bob's sister Abby is about to celebrate her engagement to society playboy Link Phillips. Abby is very happy about the engagement, but is worried that her frequently absent father "Cap" will not arrive in time for the party. Maisie is convinced that all of the guests are "phonies," but Abby is kind and asks Maisie to become her personal maid. Maisie soon learns that Cap has rarely been with his children since his wife died many years before. His neglect has made Abby very lonely and insecure and led to Bob's drinking and giving up a promising career as an engineer. The ... +


When drunken millionaire Bob Rawlston causes Maisie Ravier to ruin her carnival sideshow act, she is fired. Later, Bob lets the furious Maisie have his car to drive back to New York City. On the way, she is stopped by a motorcycle cop who recognizes the car and, thinking she has stolen it, takes her to jail. The next day, Bob cannot remember the previous night and refuses to press charges. As Maisie has been verbally abusive to the policeman and has no money or job, the judge threatens to throw her in jail, until a remorseful Bob admits that Maisie's version of the story is probably correct. The judge then orders Bob to employ Maisie for $25 a week for two months. Bob takes her to his family estate and hires her as a maid, impressing Maisie with his kindness. The head butler, Walpole, takes Maisie under his wing and tries to show her how to dress and act properly. The house is filled with guests, as Bob's sister Abby is about to celebrate her engagement to society playboy Link Phillips. Abby is very happy about the engagement, but is worried that her frequently absent father "Cap" will not arrive in time for the party. Maisie is convinced that all of the guests are "phonies," but Abby is kind and asks Maisie to become her personal maid. Maisie soon learns that Cap has rarely been with his children since his wife died many years before. His neglect has made Abby very lonely and insecure and led to Bob's drinking and giving up a promising career as an engineer. The night before the engagement party, Diana Webley, Link's former fiancée and a friend of Abby, arrives, secretly bent on stopping Link and Abby's marriage. At breakfast the next day, Link is unnerved by Diana's presence and quickly leaves. Meanwhile, Cap sends Abby expensive jewelry to make up for his not being there, something he has done repeatedly over the years. Link then convinces the distraught Abby to elope with him. Maisie, who has a "hunch" about Link, is dismayed. While Link is getting ready, Diana enters his room, leaving the door open. When Diana realizes that Link still wants to see her and is only marrying Abby for her money, she says that she has been a fool and wants to warn Abby. Just then Abby arrives and at first refuses to believe Diana, who says that all of Abby's friends have been laughing over Abby's blindness and stupidity about Link. Maisie arrives just as Diana reads a letter from Link in which he admits that money was his only reason for marrying Abby. Although Maisie tries to comfort Abby, she feels that no one has ever liked her and tries to poison herself. Sometime later, when Cap arrives, after being summoned by Walpole, Abby is still unconscious and near death. Cap tells Bob that he does not understand what is wrong and says that Abby has always been sweet, but not very attractive. When Maisie hears him talking so dispassionately, she laces into him about Bob and Abby, making him realize that he has been a negligent father. Now shocked into realizing what is wrong with their lives, Cap and Bob appeal to Abby, who soon recovers. Abby asks Maisie to be her companion, and Bob, realizing that he has fallen in love with Maisie, proposes, but she is sure that she could never be the lady of a house such as the Rawlstons' and leaves. Some time later, Bob locates Maisie at a vaudeville house and finally convinces her that she is a "lady," and she agrees to marry him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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