Navy Blues (1941)

108-109 mins | Musical comedy | 13 September 1941

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Cinematographer:

Tony Gaudio

Editor:

Rudi Fehr

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a statement at the end of the credits, this picture was produced under the auspices of the motion picture committee cooperating for national defense. A 15 Jan 1941 news item in LAEx notes that Warner Bros. budgeted $1,200,000 for the film, that Sam Wood was to direct, that Eddie Albert was to co-star with Jack Haley and Jack Oakie and that Cole Porter was to write the songs. According to an 11 Mar 1941 HR news item, Al Dubin was to collaborate with Arthur Schwartz on the songs. Other HR news items add the following information about the production: Mark Hellinger was initially assigned as associate producer. The studio considered making the film in Technicolor. The Dudley Chambers Choral Group was to be included, but its participation in the final film has not been determined. A unit was sent to Honolulu to film hula dancers for scenes in the movie.
       According to a press release dated 16 Apr 1941 included in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library, the Navy Blues Sextet was created when United States soldiers were asked to choose the six most beautiful women from a field of 150, many of whom were Warner Bros. contract players. A 1 May 1941 press release lists the winners as Georgia Carroll, Alexis Smith, Loraine Gettman, Kay Aldridge, Marguerite Chapman and Peggy Diggins. HR notes that Claire James replaced Alexis Smith before filming when the latter was assigned to Dive Bomber, and an 8 Oct 1941 press release notes that Alice Talton replaced Claire James before the filming of ...

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According to a statement at the end of the credits, this picture was produced under the auspices of the motion picture committee cooperating for national defense. A 15 Jan 1941 news item in LAEx notes that Warner Bros. budgeted $1,200,000 for the film, that Sam Wood was to direct, that Eddie Albert was to co-star with Jack Haley and Jack Oakie and that Cole Porter was to write the songs. According to an 11 Mar 1941 HR news item, Al Dubin was to collaborate with Arthur Schwartz on the songs. Other HR news items add the following information about the production: Mark Hellinger was initially assigned as associate producer. The studio considered making the film in Technicolor. The Dudley Chambers Choral Group was to be included, but its participation in the final film has not been determined. A unit was sent to Honolulu to film hula dancers for scenes in the movie.
       According to a press release dated 16 Apr 1941 included in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library, the Navy Blues Sextet was created when United States soldiers were asked to choose the six most beautiful women from a field of 150, many of whom were Warner Bros. contract players. A 1 May 1941 press release lists the winners as Georgia Carroll, Alexis Smith, Loraine Gettman, Kay Aldridge, Marguerite Chapman and Peggy Diggins. HR notes that Claire James replaced Alexis Smith before filming when the latter was assigned to Dive Bomber, and an 8 Oct 1941 press release notes that Alice Talton replaced Claire James before the filming of You're in the Army Now. Navy Blues marked the motion picture debut of actor/comedian Jackie Gleason.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Aug 1941
---
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1941
---
Film Daily
13 Aug 1941
p. 13
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 1940
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 1941
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 1941
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 1941
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 1941
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1941
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 1941
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1941
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 1941
p. 6
Los Angeles Examiner
15 Jan 1941
---
Motion Picture Herald
16 Aug 1941
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Aug 1941
p. 205
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Sep 1941
p. 249
New York Times
20 Sep 1941
p. 11
Variety
13 Aug 1941
p. 8
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Eddie Blatt
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dance seq photog
Dance seq photog
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Orch arr
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Mus nos dir
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
J. J. Giblon
Tech adv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Navy Blues," "You're a Natural," "In Waikiki" and "When Are We Going to Land Abroad," music and lyrics by Arthur Schwartz and Johnny Mercer.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 September 1941
Production Date:
mid Apr--mid Jun 1941
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
13 September 1941
LP10688
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
108-109
Length(in feet):
9,704
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Lilibelle Bolton and Margie Jordan are two show girls working in Honolulu. A Navy ship carrying Cake O'Hare and Lilibelle's ex-husband, Powerhouse Bolton, docks in port and is met by Lilibelle, who is in search of her alimony. Powerhouse is surprised to see Lilibelle, as she was in San Diego when his ship set sail. In order to get rid of her, Powerhouse and Cake pretend that she was asking them questions about the ship and have her arrested as a spy. The sailors' plan to have a wild shore leave is hampered by their lack of funds and they unsuccessfully beg their shipmates for help. When Cake and Powerhouse learn that expert gunner Homer Matthews is transferring to their ship, however, they believe that their problems are solved. Because no one else knows about Homer's transfer, they plan to place bets that their ship will win the upcoming gunnery contest. They ask Lilibelle and Margie for front money, and when they are refused, talk petty officer Buttons Johnson into putting up the money. All the other sailors are eager to take their bet, and Cake and Powerhouse envision great riches until they learn that Homer's service will be up before the gunnery contest. Margie suggests that they get Homer to re-enlist, but Cake and Powerhouse are unable to shake Homer's determination to return to his family farm. Finally Margie points out that most men join the Navy hoping to meet women and agrees to play up to the shy sailor. Together Margie and Homer attend a livestock exhibition and go rowing, water skiing and horseback riding, but nothing seems to work. ...

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Lilibelle Bolton and Margie Jordan are two show girls working in Honolulu. A Navy ship carrying Cake O'Hare and Lilibelle's ex-husband, Powerhouse Bolton, docks in port and is met by Lilibelle, who is in search of her alimony. Powerhouse is surprised to see Lilibelle, as she was in San Diego when his ship set sail. In order to get rid of her, Powerhouse and Cake pretend that she was asking them questions about the ship and have her arrested as a spy. The sailors' plan to have a wild shore leave is hampered by their lack of funds and they unsuccessfully beg their shipmates for help. When Cake and Powerhouse learn that expert gunner Homer Matthews is transferring to their ship, however, they believe that their problems are solved. Because no one else knows about Homer's transfer, they plan to place bets that their ship will win the upcoming gunnery contest. They ask Lilibelle and Margie for front money, and when they are refused, talk petty officer Buttons Johnson into putting up the money. All the other sailors are eager to take their bet, and Cake and Powerhouse envision great riches until they learn that Homer's service will be up before the gunnery contest. Margie suggests that they get Homer to re-enlist, but Cake and Powerhouse are unable to shake Homer's determination to return to his family farm. Finally Margie points out that most men join the Navy hoping to meet women and agrees to play up to the shy sailor. Together Margie and Homer attend a livestock exhibition and go rowing, water skiing and horseback riding, but nothing seems to work. Then Lilibelle discovers that Homer plans to marry Margie and take her back to the farm with him. To stop this, Cake and Powerhouse tell Homer that Margie has only been nice to him to make him re-enlist. Paradoxically, this information causes Homer to re-join the Navy because he cannot bear to go home without Margie. When the gunnery contest takes place, however, Homer is too lovesick to shoot. Cake tries to persuade him that Margie cares for him, but Homer is not convinced until Margie flies over the ship in an airplane and, using a hog call, demonstrates that she really loves him. Homer wins the gunnery contest and Lilibelle finally collects her alimony.

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GENRE
Sub-genre:
Military


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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