Skylark (1941)

92-93 mins | Romantic comedy | 21 November 1941

Director:

Mark Sandrich

Producer:

Mark Sandrich

Cinematographer:

Charles Lang Jr.

Editor:

LeRoy Stone

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Roland Anderson

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Raphaelson's novel first appeared in Saturday Evening Post under the title Streamlined Heart (7 Jan--4 Feb 1939). Gertrude Lawrence played the female lead in the play. A news item in NYT noted that the filmmakers altered the play for its screen adaptation, including "the part about the adopted baby that was sent back to the orphanage...because the fans might not approve of Miss Colbert treating an infant so heartlessly." Actor Hobart Cavanaugh's name was misspelled in the onscreen credits as "Cavanagh." HR production charts list Ray Storm as film editor; however, this is most likely a typographical error for LeRoy Stone. HR news items note that Melvyn Douglas was originally cast in the part of "Tony Kenyon." Loren Ryder, chief sound engineer at Paramount studios, was nominated for an Academy Award for this film; however, he did not receive credit for his work on the film. Claudette Colbert, Ray Milland and Brian Aherne reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 2 Feb ... More Less

Raphaelson's novel first appeared in Saturday Evening Post under the title Streamlined Heart (7 Jan--4 Feb 1939). Gertrude Lawrence played the female lead in the play. A news item in NYT noted that the filmmakers altered the play for its screen adaptation, including "the part about the adopted baby that was sent back to the orphanage...because the fans might not approve of Miss Colbert treating an infant so heartlessly." Actor Hobart Cavanaugh's name was misspelled in the onscreen credits as "Cavanagh." HR production charts list Ray Storm as film editor; however, this is most likely a typographical error for LeRoy Stone. HR news items note that Melvyn Douglas was originally cast in the part of "Tony Kenyon." Loren Ryder, chief sound engineer at Paramount studios, was nominated for an Academy Award for this film; however, he did not receive credit for his work on the film. Claudette Colbert, Ray Milland and Brian Aherne reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 2 Feb 1942. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
13 Sep 1941.
---
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1941.
---
Film Daily
5 Sep 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 40
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 40
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 41
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Sep 41
p. 257.
New York Times
20 Nov 41
p. 39.
Variety
10 Sep 41
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mark Sandrich Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Miss Colbert's gowns by
MUSIC
Mus score
PRODUCTION MISC
Dog trainer for "Butch"
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Skylark by Samson Raphaelson, as produced by John Golden (New York, 11 Oct 1939) and his novel of the same name (New York, 1939).
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 November 1941
Production Date:
29 Jan--2 Apr 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
19 November 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10843
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
92-93
Length(in feet):
8,455
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7085
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Lydia Kenyon discovers that her husband Tony, an advertising executive, has sent his friend, George Gorell, to select a fifth wedding anniversary gift for her. Lydia handles the situation with humor, but when Tony, who has no thoughts for anything but his work, "gives" their cook to his client's wife, the snooty Mrs. Myrtle Vantine, Lydia becomes furious and leaves her own cocktail party with Jim Blake, a man she has just met. Although Jim tries to seduce Lydia, she resists his flattery, and they return to the party long after everyone has left. Tony believes his advertising account with Vantine has been jeapordized by Lydia and forces her to call Mrs. Vantine and apologize for deserting the party with Jim, with whom Mrs. Vantine has been having an affair. When Lydia finally leaves Tony, she asks Jim, a lawyer, to handle the divorce, but Tony forestalls her actions by lying to her that he will quit his job so that they can be together. Shortly after, Mrs. Vantine surprises Lydia with a visit and threatens to fire Tony if Lydia does not stop seeing Jim. Lydia, who believes she has nothing to lose, insults Mrs. Vantine by calling her a tramp and a "scheming cow." Lydia later discovers that Tony lied about quitting his job, and some time later, she is granted a Reno divorce. Lydia subsequently spends all her time with Jim, who has genuinely fallen in love with her. Tony refuses to accept the divorce and, having lost his job, takes a government job in South America with the hope that Lydia will reunite with him there. ... +


Lydia Kenyon discovers that her husband Tony, an advertising executive, has sent his friend, George Gorell, to select a fifth wedding anniversary gift for her. Lydia handles the situation with humor, but when Tony, who has no thoughts for anything but his work, "gives" their cook to his client's wife, the snooty Mrs. Myrtle Vantine, Lydia becomes furious and leaves her own cocktail party with Jim Blake, a man she has just met. Although Jim tries to seduce Lydia, she resists his flattery, and they return to the party long after everyone has left. Tony believes his advertising account with Vantine has been jeapordized by Lydia and forces her to call Mrs. Vantine and apologize for deserting the party with Jim, with whom Mrs. Vantine has been having an affair. When Lydia finally leaves Tony, she asks Jim, a lawyer, to handle the divorce, but Tony forestalls her actions by lying to her that he will quit his job so that they can be together. Shortly after, Mrs. Vantine surprises Lydia with a visit and threatens to fire Tony if Lydia does not stop seeing Jim. Lydia, who believes she has nothing to lose, insults Mrs. Vantine by calling her a tramp and a "scheming cow." Lydia later discovers that Tony lied about quitting his job, and some time later, she is granted a Reno divorce. Lydia subsequently spends all her time with Jim, who has genuinely fallen in love with her. Tony refuses to accept the divorce and, having lost his job, takes a government job in South America with the hope that Lydia will reunite with him there. At their summer home, Lydia convinces Tony that they are through, and he departs for South America. The next day, Lydia and Jim go sailing on his yacht, and in the throes of a storm, Lydia realizes that she only wants to be with Tony. She ends her relationship with Jim and reunites with Tony as the ship docks in Havana, Cuba. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.