Tight Shoes (1941)

67 mins | Comedy | 13 June 1941

Full page view
HISTORY

The film's title card lists the title as Damon Runyon's Tight Shoes . HR reported that Mayfair Productions purchased two short stories from writer Damon Runyon in Oct 1940, this one and "Butch Minds the Baby," which was also produced through Universal under that title (See Entry). HR reported that actor Broderick Crawford had been loaned by Universal to Warner Bros. for Manpower (See Entry), but when casting problems delayed the production of that film, he returned to Universal to star in Tight Shoes . The DV review called the film "...the closest interpretation of the Damon Runyon humor that has yet been brought to the screen." Actress Binnie Barnes and actor, radio announcer Mike Frankovich had been married in real life since 1940. Frankovich was also a prominent producer and production executive from the 1940s on. This was the only film in which Barnes and Frankovich, who were married until his death in 1992, appeared ... More Less

The film's title card lists the title as Damon Runyon's Tight Shoes . HR reported that Mayfair Productions purchased two short stories from writer Damon Runyon in Oct 1940, this one and "Butch Minds the Baby," which was also produced through Universal under that title (See Entry). HR reported that actor Broderick Crawford had been loaned by Universal to Warner Bros. for Manpower (See Entry), but when casting problems delayed the production of that film, he returned to Universal to star in Tight Shoes . The DV review called the film "...the closest interpretation of the Damon Runyon humor that has yet been brought to the screen." Actress Binnie Barnes and actor, radio announcer Mike Frankovich had been married in real life since 1940. Frankovich was also a prominent producer and production executive from the 1940s on. This was the only film in which Barnes and Frankovich, who were married until his death in 1992, appeared together. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Jun 1941.
---
Daily Variety
9 Jun 41
p. 3.
Film Daily
11 Jun 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Oct 40
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 41
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 41
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jun 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 May 41
p. 134.
New York Times
19 Jun 41
p. 25.
Variety
11 Jun 41
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
[Sd] tech
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit pub wrt
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Tight Shoes" by Damon Runyon in Collier's (18 Apr 1936).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Damon Runyon's Tight Shoes
Release Date:
13 June 1941
Production Date:
20 March--early April 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
28 May 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10489
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67
Length(in feet):
6,065
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Allan McGrath, editor of the Star-Dispatch , is having dinner with a group of newspapermen, when one complains of "tight shoes," prompting Alan to tell them the story of Jimmy Rupert and Speedy Miller. With election time rolling around, the district attorney had gone after New York's gambling houses, but he was unable to find the den of Speedy Miller, and therefore, was unable to uncover the political boss known only as "The Brain," who protects Speedy. The Brain tells Speedy that he must set up more games in his district, in order to make up for their losses in other areas. Speedy is then given $5,000 to bet on a fixed horse race. Speedy and his hoods, Blooch and Okay, go to Amalfi's shoe store, where they force the proprietor to sell out, as they plan to make the store the "front" for their new gambling house. Before they leave, however, Blooch ruins Speedy's shoes, and when he forces clerk Jimmy Rupert to serve him, the two argue over Speedy's shoe size. Jimmy later complains to his waitress girl friend Ruth that even though he is a college graduate, he makes so little money they cannot get married. At the race track, Speedy, who is now suffering from "tight shoes," bets on a long shot hunch named Feet First instead of sure thing Pam's Mam, and loses all his money when Feet First is disqualified. His girl friend, show girl Sybil Ash, becomes so upset that she kicks him, and he punches her in the jaw in return. Speedy blames his loses on Jimmy and orders him fired from Amalfi's. ... +


Allan McGrath, editor of the Star-Dispatch , is having dinner with a group of newspapermen, when one complains of "tight shoes," prompting Alan to tell them the story of Jimmy Rupert and Speedy Miller. With election time rolling around, the district attorney had gone after New York's gambling houses, but he was unable to find the den of Speedy Miller, and therefore, was unable to uncover the political boss known only as "The Brain," who protects Speedy. The Brain tells Speedy that he must set up more games in his district, in order to make up for their losses in other areas. Speedy is then given $5,000 to bet on a fixed horse race. Speedy and his hoods, Blooch and Okay, go to Amalfi's shoe store, where they force the proprietor to sell out, as they plan to make the store the "front" for their new gambling house. Before they leave, however, Blooch ruins Speedy's shoes, and when he forces clerk Jimmy Rupert to serve him, the two argue over Speedy's shoe size. Jimmy later complains to his waitress girl friend Ruth that even though he is a college graduate, he makes so little money they cannot get married. At the race track, Speedy, who is now suffering from "tight shoes," bets on a long shot hunch named Feet First instead of sure thing Pam's Mam, and loses all his money when Feet First is disqualified. His girl friend, show girl Sybil Ash, becomes so upset that she kicks him, and he punches her in the jaw in return. Speedy blames his loses on Jimmy and orders him fired from Amalfi's. Jimmy then complains to Ruth about the crooked politicians like "Honest John" Beebe, who allow men like Speedy to run the city. McGrath overhears Jimmy and takes him to one of Beebe's political rallies. At the rally, Jimmy challenges the crooked politician and ends up leading a raid on Amalfi's. A riot breaks out, and Sybil and Ruth are arrested in the midst of the madness. With the help of McGrath and the district attorney, Jimmy is nominated to run against Beebe. Unknown to McGrath, this is contrary to the desires of his boss, Horace Grover, the managing editor of his paper, who is, in actuality, The Brain. Later, Jimmy is met at his home by a group of reporters, and Ruth and Sybil are present as well. When Sybil learns that Jimmy is the one who sold Speedy his "tight shoes," she offers him her full support. While Grover blocks McGrath's efforts, Sybil's work on the young man's behalf turns the election. Jimmy's success soon goes to his head, but he still proclaims his love to Ruth. She, however, sees him turning toward Sybil and Grover, and rejects him. The now down-and-out Speedy goes to Amalfi for help, and the retailer hires the ex-gangster as a clerk. Jimmy and Sybil become engaged, and Amalfi orders Speedy to take a pair of shoes to the new councilman for his wedding. Speedy deliberately selects takes a pair of "tight shoes," the box for which Ruth assumes is a bomb. When Sybil sees Speedy at the church, she asks him to give her away and he agrees. After he delivers the shoes, however, Speedy is knocked out by Ruth, who explains to Sybil her conviction about the "bomb." The two women start fighting, with Jimmy in the middle. After Sybil strikes both Ruth and Jimmy, he throws her into a flower arrangement. Speedy then awakens, but before he can strike Jimmy, he is stopped by Grover, whom he exposes as The Brain. While Grover exits with the district attorney, the two couples begin fighting, and eventually become reunited and married as originally intended. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.