The Strawberry Blonde (1941)

97-98 mins | Comedy-drama | 22 February 1941

Full page view
HISTORY

According to news items in HR, Brian Donlevy was considered for a top role, and Ann Sheridan was to have played "Virginia Brush," the role played by Rita Hayworth, but was involved in a salary dispute with the studio when shooting began. "Virginia" was Hayworth's first leading role in a major production. On 31 Aug 1940, LAT noted that Brenda Marshall was tested for the role of "Amy." In addition to the songs listed above, several old songs are included in the score. A 4 Jan 1940 HR news item reports that Warner Bros. had purchased the screen rights to the play from Paramount, whose 1938 film One Sunday Afternoon starred Gary Cooper and Fay Wray and was directed by Stephen Roberts (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.3274). For this version, the studio changed the small town setting of the play and the 1933 Paramount film to New York City. Heinz Roemheld received an Academy Award nomination in the Music (Scoring of a Musical Picture) category.
       Other filmed adaptations of James Hagan's play include a musical version, also directed by Raoul Walsh, for Warner Bros. in 1948 entitled One Sunday Afternoon (see entry). Three television productions have been made: The 1949 Ford Television Theatre broadcast over CBS entitled One Sunday Afternoon, directed by Marc Daniels and starring Burgess Meredith, Francesca Bruning, Hume Cronyn and Augusta Roeland; the 1957 Lux Video Theatre production of the same title, directed by David McDearmon and starring Gordon McacRae, Peter Lind Hayes, Mary Healy and Sheila Stevens; and a ...

More Less

According to news items in HR, Brian Donlevy was considered for a top role, and Ann Sheridan was to have played "Virginia Brush," the role played by Rita Hayworth, but was involved in a salary dispute with the studio when shooting began. "Virginia" was Hayworth's first leading role in a major production. On 31 Aug 1940, LAT noted that Brenda Marshall was tested for the role of "Amy." In addition to the songs listed above, several old songs are included in the score. A 4 Jan 1940 HR news item reports that Warner Bros. had purchased the screen rights to the play from Paramount, whose 1938 film One Sunday Afternoon starred Gary Cooper and Fay Wray and was directed by Stephen Roberts (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.3274). For this version, the studio changed the small town setting of the play and the 1933 Paramount film to New York City. Heinz Roemheld received an Academy Award nomination in the Music (Scoring of a Musical Picture) category.
       Other filmed adaptations of James Hagan's play include a musical version, also directed by Raoul Walsh, for Warner Bros. in 1948 entitled One Sunday Afternoon (see entry). Three television productions have been made: The 1949 Ford Television Theatre broadcast over CBS entitled One Sunday Afternoon, directed by Marc Daniels and starring Burgess Meredith, Francesca Bruning, Hume Cronyn and Augusta Roeland; the 1957 Lux Video Theatre production of the same title, directed by David McDearmon and starring Gordon McacRae, Peter Lind Hayes, Mary Healy and Sheila Stevens; and a 1959 David Susskind-Talent Associates production of the same name broadcast on NBC, directed by William Corrigan and starring David Wayne, Janet Blair, Eddie Bracken and Dolores Dorn-Heft.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Feb 1941
---
Film Daily
13 Feb 1941
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 1940
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 1940
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 1940
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1940
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 1941
p. 3
Los Angeles Times
31 Aug 1940
---
New York Times
2 Feb 1941
p. 11
Variety
19 Feb 1941
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
H. Roemheld
Mus
Orch arr
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play One Sunday Afternoon by James Hagan (New York, 15 Feb 1933).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home," words and music by Hughie Cannon; "Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis," words by Andrew B. Sterling, music by Kerry Mills; "The Band Played On," words by John E. Palmer, music by Charles B. Ward; "Let the Rest of the World Go By," words by J. Keirn Brennan, music by Ernest R. Ball.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 February 1941
Production Date:
mid Oct--mid Dec 1940
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
22 February 1941
LP10270
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
97-98
Length(in feet):
8,763
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

At the turn of the century, New York dentist Biff Grimes is reminiscing about the past when he receives a telephone call asking him to pull alderman Hugo Barnstead's aching tooth. Biff carries a grudge against Hugo, a man he has known from his youth: Their rivalry begins when both men fall in love with Virginia Brush, a strawberry blonde. Hugo arranges to meet Virginia "accidentally" in the park. In order that the meeting appear to be innocent, Virginia brings her friend, Amy Lind, a nurse who is outspokenly in favor of women's rights, and Hugo brings Biff. Hugo lures Biff into accompanying him by promising him that he can be Virginia's date, but when the foursome arrives in the country after a short carriage ride, Hugo pairs off with Virginia, leaving Biff to entertain Amy. To finish off Biff's disappointing evening, he is forced to pay for the carriage rental. The following week, Biff dates Virginia and spends all his money taking her to expensive places. When he tries to make another date with her, she turns him down, but Biff keeps trying and eventually Virginia agrees to meet him in the park. To Biff's surprise, Amy keeps the date in Virginia's place. When Biff learns from a passing friend that Virginia and Hugo eloped earlier that day, Amy does her best to console him. Eventually, Biff asks Amy if he can see her again, and over time, they fall in love and marry. One evening, Virginia invites Biff and Amy to dine with her and Hugo. Hugo spends the evening bragging about his wealth and then offers to bring ...

More Less

At the turn of the century, New York dentist Biff Grimes is reminiscing about the past when he receives a telephone call asking him to pull alderman Hugo Barnstead's aching tooth. Biff carries a grudge against Hugo, a man he has known from his youth: Their rivalry begins when both men fall in love with Virginia Brush, a strawberry blonde. Hugo arranges to meet Virginia "accidentally" in the park. In order that the meeting appear to be innocent, Virginia brings her friend, Amy Lind, a nurse who is outspokenly in favor of women's rights, and Hugo brings Biff. Hugo lures Biff into accompanying him by promising him that he can be Virginia's date, but when the foursome arrives in the country after a short carriage ride, Hugo pairs off with Virginia, leaving Biff to entertain Amy. To finish off Biff's disappointing evening, he is forced to pay for the carriage rental. The following week, Biff dates Virginia and spends all his money taking her to expensive places. When he tries to make another date with her, she turns him down, but Biff keeps trying and eventually Virginia agrees to meet him in the park. To Biff's surprise, Amy keeps the date in Virginia's place. When Biff learns from a passing friend that Virginia and Hugo eloped earlier that day, Amy does her best to console him. Eventually, Biff asks Amy if he can see her again, and over time, they fall in love and marry. One evening, Virginia invites Biff and Amy to dine with her and Hugo. Hugo spends the evening bragging about his wealth and then offers to bring Biff into his firm. Biff accepts his offer, but is frustrated when he learns that he is not expected to do much except sign his name to various papers. The reason for this becomes clear when the firm is accused of graft. Biff is held responsible for the crimes and Hugo, whose name does not appear on any papers, goes free. Things become even blacker when Biff's father, who is working on one of the firm's projects, is killed when a building collapses due to the use of inferior materials. Biff is held responsible and is sent to jail. By the time he is released, he has completed a correspondence school course in dentistry, and he and Amy move to a new neighborhood. Meanwhile, Hugo has gone on to a successful career in politics. Remembering these events, Biff vows vengeance on Hugo. When Hugo and Virginia arrive, they are surprised to discover that Biff is the dentist. Hugo and Virginia cannot stop quarreling and it is clear that they have a miserable marriage. Biff gets his revenge by pulling Hugo's tooth without gas, and realizes suddenly that he has a good life with Amy and is very glad that he did not marry Virginia, especially when Amy reveals that she is pregnant.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Johnny O'Clock

This was the first film of producer Ed Nealis and well-known celebrity lawyer Jerry Gielser. The film also marked Robert Rossen's directorial debut, and the screen debut of actor ... >>

The Godfather

The film's opening title card reads: "Mario Puzo's The Godfather." While the first strains of a trumpet solo of Nino Rota's "Godfather" theme are heard on ... >>

Cannery Row

       The first attempt at a motion picture adaptation of John Steinbeck’s 1945 novel, Cannery Row, was made in the late 1940s. According to a news item ... >>

Stagecoach

The American folk songs adapted for the score included the traditional ballads "Lily Dale," "Rosa Lee," "Joe Bowers," "Joe the Wrangler," "She's More to Be Pitied Than Censured," "She ... >>

Dracula

Bela Lugosi created the role of Dracula onstage in the 5 Oct 1927 American premiere of Hamilton Deane's adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel. Lon Chaney was originally ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.