Tom, Dick and Harry (1941)

85-86 mins | Romantic comedy | 13 June 1941

Director:

Garson Kanin

Writer:

Peter Achilles

Producer:

Robert Sisk

Cinematographer:

Merritt Gerstad

Editor:

John Sturges

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

In the opening credits, Ginger Rogers' names is presented as Snirgor Greeg, George Murphy is George Yumph, Alan Marshal is Hasalmar Nall, Burgess Meredith is Essrude Mithgreh, Robert Sisk is Sert Borisk and Paul Jarrico is Rila Cojurpa. After appearing on the screen, the letters rearrange themselves to form the correct spelling of the above names. Pre-production news items in HR note that the start of production was postponed twice: first for script problems and second because of Rogers' illness. Actor James Ellison was originally slated to play the role of "Dick," according to a news item in HR . Other news items in HR add that Alan Marshal was borrowed from David O. Selznick and George Murphy from M-G-M. According to a news item in NYT , this was Ginger Rogers final film under her exclusive contract with RKO. It was also her first film since winning the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in the 1940 film Kitty Foyle (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2314).
       According to the Var review, this picture also marked the last RKO productions for producer Robert Sisk and director Garson Kanin. Sisk moved to Paramount and Kanin joined the army. Another news item in HR notes that this production was the first to use stroboscopic high speed flash lamps that could shoot stop-motion still photographs during filming. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Screenplay. Modern sources credit Mel Berns with makeup and John Miehle with still photography and add Theodore Ramsey to the cast. In 1957, ... More Less

In the opening credits, Ginger Rogers' names is presented as Snirgor Greeg, George Murphy is George Yumph, Alan Marshal is Hasalmar Nall, Burgess Meredith is Essrude Mithgreh, Robert Sisk is Sert Borisk and Paul Jarrico is Rila Cojurpa. After appearing on the screen, the letters rearrange themselves to form the correct spelling of the above names. Pre-production news items in HR note that the start of production was postponed twice: first for script problems and second because of Rogers' illness. Actor James Ellison was originally slated to play the role of "Dick," according to a news item in HR . Other news items in HR add that Alan Marshal was borrowed from David O. Selznick and George Murphy from M-G-M. According to a news item in NYT , this was Ginger Rogers final film under her exclusive contract with RKO. It was also her first film since winning the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in the 1940 film Kitty Foyle (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.2314).
       According to the Var review, this picture also marked the last RKO productions for producer Robert Sisk and director Garson Kanin. Sisk moved to Paramount and Kanin joined the army. Another news item in HR notes that this production was the first to use stroboscopic high speed flash lamps that could shoot stop-motion still photographs during filming. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Screenplay. Modern sources credit Mel Berns with makeup and John Miehle with still photography and add Theodore Ramsey to the cast. In 1957, RKO remade the story as The Girl Most Likely , a musical comedy directed by Mitchell Leisen and starring Jane Powell and Cliff Robertson. Ginger Rogers and George Murphy reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 8 Sep 1941. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Jul 1941.
---
Daily Variety
14 Jul 41
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Jul 41
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jan 41
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 41
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 41
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 41
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 41
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 May 41
p. 121.
New York Times
29 Jan 1941.
---
New York Times
14 May 1941.
---
New York Times
18 Jul 41
p. 22.
Variety
16 Jul 41
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Assoc dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
SOURCES
SONGS
"Tom Collins," words and music by Gene Rose and Roy Webb.
COMPOSERS
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 June 1941
Production Date:
mid February--19 May 1941
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 July 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10594
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85-86
Length(in feet):
7,797
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7136
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Inspired by celluloid fantasies, Janie, a telephone operator in a small midwestern town, decides to marry a rich man. Consequently, when Janie's boyfriend Tom, an ambitious automobile salesman, pleads with her to marry him, Janie half-heartedly consents. That night, Janie dreams of a married life with Tom dictated by auto sales, business promotions and babies. At work the next day, Janie connects a long-distance phone call between Dick Hamilton, the son of the town's wealthiest family, and his New York girl friend, Brenda Whitney, Jr. Janie's exchange with Dick renews her hopes of marrying a millionaire, and while walking home from work that day, she wishes on a star to marry Dick. Consequently, when a man driving an expensive car pulls up alongside the curb, Janie assumes that her wish has been answered and climbs into the car. After taking her home, the driver asks her for a date. When he arrives that night, however, Janie discovers that her date is not Dick but Harry, a romantic garage mechanic. After a night spent bowling and talking, Harry proclaims that he thinks he is in love with Janie and proposes. Upon hearing bells when they kiss, Janie accepts his proposal but warns Harry that she has a date with Tom the following evening. That night, Janie dreams of living in a shack with an amorous but unemployed Harry. The next evening, Harry visits Tom's automobile agency, and Tom, always eager to make a sale, cancels his date with Janie to take Harry, who he thinks is a prospective customer, on a test drive. Harry directs a surprised Tom to Janie's house to pick up ... +


Inspired by celluloid fantasies, Janie, a telephone operator in a small midwestern town, decides to marry a rich man. Consequently, when Janie's boyfriend Tom, an ambitious automobile salesman, pleads with her to marry him, Janie half-heartedly consents. That night, Janie dreams of a married life with Tom dictated by auto sales, business promotions and babies. At work the next day, Janie connects a long-distance phone call between Dick Hamilton, the son of the town's wealthiest family, and his New York girl friend, Brenda Whitney, Jr. Janie's exchange with Dick renews her hopes of marrying a millionaire, and while walking home from work that day, she wishes on a star to marry Dick. Consequently, when a man driving an expensive car pulls up alongside the curb, Janie assumes that her wish has been answered and climbs into the car. After taking her home, the driver asks her for a date. When he arrives that night, however, Janie discovers that her date is not Dick but Harry, a romantic garage mechanic. After a night spent bowling and talking, Harry proclaims that he thinks he is in love with Janie and proposes. Upon hearing bells when they kiss, Janie accepts his proposal but warns Harry that she has a date with Tom the following evening. That night, Janie dreams of living in a shack with an amorous but unemployed Harry. The next evening, Harry visits Tom's automobile agency, and Tom, always eager to make a sale, cancels his date with Janie to take Harry, who he thinks is a prospective customer, on a test drive. Harry directs a surprised Tom to Janie's house to pick up his girl friend and then instructs him to drive to Inspiration Point, where Tom orders them out of the car. After Tom drives off, Dick roars up in his car, and Harry asks him to drive them back to town. That night, Janie dreams of being the "toast of the town" as Dick's wife. At work the next morning, Janie disconnects a call between Dick and Brenda, thus inciting a fight between the couple when each thinks the other hung up. Janie then wangles a date with Dick, who invites her to Chicago. After a night of drinking and dancing, a tipsy Janie tricks Dick into proposing. Arriving home at dawn, they find Harry and Tom camped out on Janie's doorstep, and she announces that she is engaged to all three. Proclaiming that she will announce her bridegroom at breakfast, Janie goes to bed and dreams she marries all of them at once. At breakfast, Janie announces to her family and assembled fiancés that she will marry Dick. The couple plan to elope immediately until Harry kisses Janie farewell, and hearing bells again, she drives off with him on his scooter. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.