Andy Hardy's Double Life (1942)

91-92 mins | Comedy-drama | 1942

Director:

George B. Seitz

Cinematographers:

John Mescall, George Folsey

Editor:

Gene Ruggiero

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles for this film were Andy Hardy's Last Fling and Andy Hardy Steps Out . The opening credits are preceded by a photograph of the "Hardy Family," and the opening title card reads: "Judge Hardy's Family in Andy Hardy's Double Life ." Esther Williams, who was a former freestyle women's swimming champion and the star of Billy Rose's San Francisco Aquacade, made her screen debut in the film. The Var reviewer praised Williams' performance, noting that she showed "considerable promise," while the DV reviewer described her as a "looker...and a capable actress to boot." Williams became one of the top box office stars of the late 1940s and early 1950s. She became most famous for M-G-M musicals that featured her in lavish production numbers that showcased her swimming abilities.
       The film was in release Dec 1942-Feb 1943.
       At the 4 Mar 1943 Academy Awards ceremony, M-G-M received a special award "for it's achievement in representing the American Way of Life in the production of the 'Andy Hardy' series of films." For additional information on the "Hardy Family" series, please see the entry for A Family Affair in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.1269 and consult the Series ... More Less

The working titles for this film were Andy Hardy's Last Fling and Andy Hardy Steps Out . The opening credits are preceded by a photograph of the "Hardy Family," and the opening title card reads: "Judge Hardy's Family in Andy Hardy's Double Life ." Esther Williams, who was a former freestyle women's swimming champion and the star of Billy Rose's San Francisco Aquacade, made her screen debut in the film. The Var reviewer praised Williams' performance, noting that she showed "considerable promise," while the DV reviewer described her as a "looker...and a capable actress to boot." Williams became one of the top box office stars of the late 1940s and early 1950s. She became most famous for M-G-M musicals that featured her in lavish production numbers that showcased her swimming abilities.
       The film was in release Dec 1942-Feb 1943.
       At the 4 Mar 1943 Academy Awards ceremony, M-G-M received a special award "for it's achievement in representing the American Way of Life in the production of the 'Andy Hardy' series of films." For additional information on the "Hardy Family" series, please see the entry for A Family Affair in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.1269 and consult the Series Index. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Dec 1942.
---
Daily Variety
2 Dec 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Dec 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 42
p. 6, 10
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jul 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 42
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Dec 42
p. 1042.
New York Times
12 Jan 43
p. 23.
Variety
2 Dec 42
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Aurania Rouverol.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Andy Hardys Last Fling
Andy Hardy Steps Out
Release Date:
1942
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 11 January 1942
Production Date:
8 June--early July 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 December 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11791
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
91-92
Length(in feet):
8,275
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
8608
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

A few days before he is to leave Carvel for Wainwright College, Andy Hardy convinces "Botsy" and his friends to buy his jalopy for twenty dollars. Assuming that his friends will soon pay him, the nearly broke Andy then mails a twenty-dollar check to New York to cover the cost of having his new car driven to Carvel. When his sister Marian states that her boyfriend, Jeff Willis, who has been charged with drunk driving, could drive the car for free if Andy convinced their father, Judge James K. Hardy, to give him a light sentence, Andy pleads Jeff's case. Although the judge suspends Jeff's sentence, he also forbids him from driving for ninety days. Andy's disappointment is soon alleviated when his estranged girl friend, Polly Benedict, calls to make up with him. Before reuniting with Polly at her house, Andy, an incorrigible flirt, asks Marian for advice on how to "make girls crazy about him" without the promise of fidelity. Following Marian's suggestions, Andy plays the "cool cookie" with Polly, who appears to fall for the tactic but is really plotting with her college-aged friend, Sheila Brooks, to teach Andy a lesson. While Polly remains indoors, Andy goes for a swim in the Benedicts' new pool and meets the sophisticated Sheila. After explaining that she is a psychology major doing research on "reflexes," Sheila surprises Andy with a kiss. She kisses him again underwater, then tells him that he will be considered a "panty waist" if his father accompanies him to Wainwright, as the judge has planned. Later, at home, Andy hints to his father that returning to Wainwright, his ... +


A few days before he is to leave Carvel for Wainwright College, Andy Hardy convinces "Botsy" and his friends to buy his jalopy for twenty dollars. Assuming that his friends will soon pay him, the nearly broke Andy then mails a twenty-dollar check to New York to cover the cost of having his new car driven to Carvel. When his sister Marian states that her boyfriend, Jeff Willis, who has been charged with drunk driving, could drive the car for free if Andy convinced their father, Judge James K. Hardy, to give him a light sentence, Andy pleads Jeff's case. Although the judge suspends Jeff's sentence, he also forbids him from driving for ninety days. Andy's disappointment is soon alleviated when his estranged girl friend, Polly Benedict, calls to make up with him. Before reuniting with Polly at her house, Andy, an incorrigible flirt, asks Marian for advice on how to "make girls crazy about him" without the promise of fidelity. Following Marian's suggestions, Andy plays the "cool cookie" with Polly, who appears to fall for the tactic but is really plotting with her college-aged friend, Sheila Brooks, to teach Andy a lesson. While Polly remains indoors, Andy goes for a swim in the Benedicts' new pool and meets the sophisticated Sheila. After explaining that she is a psychology major doing research on "reflexes," Sheila surprises Andy with a kiss. She kisses him again underwater, then tells him that he will be considered a "panty waist" if his father accompanies him to Wainwright, as the judge has planned. Later, at home, Andy hints to his father that returning to Wainwright, his alma mater, might prove a disappointment, but the judge is too preoccupied with a case involving a young boy named "Tooky" Stedman to notice. To help his father, Andy visits Tooky, who crashed into a lumber truck while coasting down a hill in his wagon and is now suing the lumber company for failing to place a red flag on the truck's load. Although Andy agrees with his father that Tooky would not have been able to see a flag, and therefore could not have avoided the accident, he tells the judge that, unless Mrs. Stedman, a widow, wins the case, her house will be repossessed in two weeks because of Tooky's medical bills. Thus apprised, the judge, who postponed ruling on the Stedman case for two weeks so that he could go to Wainwright, cancels his plans, much to Andy's relief. Andy's troubles soon return, however, when Botsy and his friends, who have yet to pay Andy, crash his jalopy into a store window. Botsy and the boys, who have been ordered to replace the window, blackmail their way out of giving Andy his twenty dollars using a photograph that Botsy took of Andy ironing Marian's underwear. Now concerned that his check will bounce, Andy questions Polly, whose father George is president of Carvel's bank, about how much George likes him. Seeing an opportunity to further tease Andy, Polly "interprets" his queries about her father as a marriage proposal and "accepts." Sheila then twists Andy's flirtations into a proposal, and Andy leaves Polly's convinced that he has promised himself to two different women. Early the next morning, just before he is to leave for college, the still dazed Andy is summoned to the Benedict house by George. Sure that George wants to discuss his marriage to Polly, Andy reluctantly appears, and is overjoyed when George instead presents him with a new checking account, into which the judge has already deposited an allowance. Andy then is confronted by Polly and Sheila, who play an incriminating recording of him wooing them with the same lines. Feeling that Andy has finally learned his lesson, Polly and Sheila assure him that he is not engaged and agree to write to him at Wainwright. Moments later, Andy bumps into Jeff, who casually reveals that while he was riding a bike, he noticed a "no trucks" sign on the hill on which Tooky had his accident. Armed with this information, Andy rushes to the courthouse, where his father is about to pass judgment in the Stedman case, and the Stedmans are awarded their settlement. After the judge declares that he will be going to Wainwright after all, Andy, acting on advice from his mother Emily, levels with his father that he does not want him to go. Although the judge at first bristles, he finally understands that he is intruding on Andy's special day. Andy, who has learned that he cannot use his newly acquired car on campus, has already left for the train station, and as his parents are driving to meet him there, one of their tires blows. Using Tooky's wagon, the judge improvises a repair and they arrive at the station seconds before Andy's train pulls out. After a heartfelt goodbye, Andy boards the train and happily discovers that a pretty young woman seated near him is going to be one of Wainwright's first co-eds. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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