The Bugle Sounds (1942)

100-101 mins | Comedy-drama | 1942

Director:

S. Sylvan Simon

Producer:

J. Walter Ruben

Cinematographer:

Clyde De Vinna

Editor:

Ben Lewis

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Steel Cavalry. The opening credits read, "Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents with the gratefully acknowledged cooperation of the United States Army." The picture opens with a prologue consisting of a dedication, montage and narration explaining the history and importance of all divisions of the U.S. Army. The prologue, which is musically accompanied by the old cavalry song "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," ends with the words "...America entrusts the future of human liberty to the strong hands of these young men. Is there any here who will not say 'God bless and keep them?'" According to a 18 Sep 1941 news item in HR, Richard Thorpe filled in for director S. Sylvan Simon while Simon was ill with the flu.
       A news item in HR on 8 Dec 1932 noted that M-G-M had planned an earlier production of The Bugle Sounds that was to be produced by George Fitzmaurice and directed by Sam Wood. The 1932 project was in no way related to the 1941 production, but was actually an unrealized project to be directed by George Roy Hill that began in 1929 as a vehicle to star Lon Chaney, then Wallace Beery as a sergeant in the French Foreign Legion.
       HR news items from Aug through Oct 1941, as well as a NYT feature article on 30 Nov 1941, report that much of the film was shot on location at Fort Ord, CA, with some backgrounds shot at Fort Knox, KY and Fort Lewis, WA. News items also reported that M-G-M additionally needed to construct on the lot ...

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The working title of the film was Steel Cavalry. The opening credits read, "Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents with the gratefully acknowledged cooperation of the United States Army." The picture opens with a prologue consisting of a dedication, montage and narration explaining the history and importance of all divisions of the U.S. Army. The prologue, which is musically accompanied by the old cavalry song "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," ends with the words "...America entrusts the future of human liberty to the strong hands of these young men. Is there any here who will not say 'God bless and keep them?'" According to a 18 Sep 1941 news item in HR, Richard Thorpe filled in for director S. Sylvan Simon while Simon was ill with the flu.
       A news item in HR on 8 Dec 1932 noted that M-G-M had planned an earlier production of The Bugle Sounds that was to be produced by George Fitzmaurice and directed by Sam Wood. The 1932 project was in no way related to the 1941 production, but was actually an unrealized project to be directed by George Roy Hill that began in 1929 as a vehicle to star Lon Chaney, then Wallace Beery as a sergeant in the French Foreign Legion.
       HR news items from Aug through Oct 1941, as well as a NYT feature article on 30 Nov 1941, report that much of the film was shot on location at Fort Ord, CA, with some backgrounds shot at Fort Knox, KY and Fort Lewis, WA. News items also reported that M-G-M additionally needed to construct on the lot a huge replica of Fort Knox and Fort Lewis. A HR news item on 2 Sep 1941 noted that Major-General Adna R. Chaffee, who had served as a U.S. Cavalry officer for twenty-five years but had just died the previous week, was originally to act as the film's technical advisor. Actor Arthur Space, who had previously worked on the stage, was brought to Hollywood by M-G-M in late 1941. The Bugle Sounds was the first motion picture in his forty-year career as a character actor in films and on television. Wallace Beery recreated his role for a Lux Radio Theatre presentation of the story on 4 Jan 1943.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Dec 1941
---
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1941
---
Film Daily
17 Dec 1941
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
8 Dec 1932
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 1941
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
25 Aug 1941
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 1941
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 1941
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1941
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 1941
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 1941
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1941
p. 16
Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 1941
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1942
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1942
p. 7
Motion Picture Daily
17 Dec 1941
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Dec 1941
p. 417
New York Times
30 Nov 1941
p. 4
New York Times
3 Apr 1941
p. 25
Variety
17 Dec 1941
p. 8
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Fill-In dir
Gil Kurland
Asst dir
Joe Newman
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
Men's cost
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Arnold Gillespie
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
MUSIC
"She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," music by Leroy Parker and M. Ottner.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Steel Cavalry
Premiere Information:
World premiere, Louisville, KY: 14 Jan 1942
Production Date:
late Aug--23 Oct 1941
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
16 December 1941
LP11038
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
100-101
Length(in feet):
9,136
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7881
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In early 1941, Colonel Lawton of the 19th Cavalry Regiment learns that his unit must convert from horses to tanks. Lawton, who himself is reluctant to change, knows that his hardest task will be to convince long-time cavalry men such as "Hap" Doan to give up their horses. Hap wants to transfer to another cavalry unit, but Lawton will not allow it, so Hap sadly goes to his horse Cantigny, whom he loves as much as the army, to tell her that he is going to buy her when he retires. Hap then goes off base for the weekend and is irritated that his departure is impeded at every turn by oncoming tanks. When he finally gets into town, he goes on a weekend-long bender and winds up at the home of his faithful girl friend Susie. Susie, who has moved her restaurant from town to town over the last eighteen years to stay close to Hap, patiently listens to his most recent proposal and promise to retire and buy a farm for her and Cantigny. Hap bristles when Russell, a former cavalry man who was dishonorably discharged, arrives to visit Susie. Russell has always been a rival for Susie's affections, and Hap is suspicious of Russell's recent affluence, which he claims comes from horse promotions. When Hap returns to the base, new recruits are arriving, including Joe Hanson, whose bride Sally follows him onto the base. While Joe is being trained by Hap, Sally goes to Susie's restaurant. Susie feels sorry for Sally and offers her cheap room and board when she learns that she is going to have a baby. Despite his ...

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In early 1941, Colonel Lawton of the 19th Cavalry Regiment learns that his unit must convert from horses to tanks. Lawton, who himself is reluctant to change, knows that his hardest task will be to convince long-time cavalry men such as "Hap" Doan to give up their horses. Hap wants to transfer to another cavalry unit, but Lawton will not allow it, so Hap sadly goes to his horse Cantigny, whom he loves as much as the army, to tell her that he is going to buy her when he retires. Hap then goes off base for the weekend and is irritated that his departure is impeded at every turn by oncoming tanks. When he finally gets into town, he goes on a weekend-long bender and winds up at the home of his faithful girl friend Susie. Susie, who has moved her restaurant from town to town over the last eighteen years to stay close to Hap, patiently listens to his most recent proposal and promise to retire and buy a farm for her and Cantigny. Hap bristles when Russell, a former cavalry man who was dishonorably discharged, arrives to visit Susie. Russell has always been a rival for Susie's affections, and Hap is suspicious of Russell's recent affluence, which he claims comes from horse promotions. When Hap returns to the base, new recruits are arriving, including Joe Hanson, whose bride Sally follows him onto the base. While Joe is being trained by Hap, Sally goes to Susie's restaurant. Susie feels sorry for Sally and offers her cheap room and board when she learns that she is going to have a baby. Despite his initial misgivings, Hap grudgingly begins to like the hard-working and enthusiastic Joe and seems to have adjusted to the unit's changes. One day, however, some new tanks arrive and the one that Joe drives blows up because it has been sabotaged. Joe cannot control the vehicle, which crashes into the stable in which Cantigny is housed. The horse's injuries are so severe that the vet orders her to be put down, and Hap sadly asks to shoot her himself. Five days later, Hap is AWOL, but Lawton refuses to take action. Instead he extends Hap's pass and asks his pals, Strong, Krims and Cartaret, to bring him back. In the meantime, an FBI man from Washington arrives, and the colonel tells him that they have been unable to find the saboteurs, but he is convinced that there is a "Mr. Brains" behind the operation. The next day, Susie shows up at the base and begs the colonel not to court-martial Hap, whom she has not seen since he went AWOL. Just then, Hap arrives, accompanied by his three pals, who all have torn clothes and black eyes. Instead of thanking Lawton for his indulgence, Hap yells at him, prompting the colonel to order Hap to the guardhouse. Hap is then court-martialed and given a dishonorable discharge, but, instead of forwarding the papers to Washington, Lawton refuses to sign them and tells his aide to throw Hap out of the guardhouse. Hap goes to Susie's, where Joe has also gone to see Sally. Because Hap refuses to listen to Joe's apologies, Susie won't let him stay and tearfully says that she is ashamed of him. Russell overhears everything and goes after Hap, saying that he has always wanted to be friends, and promising to find Hap a job. Three weeks later, Russell takes Hap to the office of Mr. Leech, who is a spy, and Hap agrees to help them prevent a shipment of tanks from reaching the East Coast. Late that night, Hap sneaks into camp and goes to Lawton, with whom he has been secretly working, and reveals that he has made contact with the spy ring. Lawton asks Hap to stay with the spies until he finds out who "Mr. Brains" is. He then gives Hap specific information to pass on to the spies. Soon Hap goes on a long drive with Russell and Leech and finally stops at a barn close to a bridge on which Leech's men are setting dynamite meant to destroy the tank train. Because Hap has not been able to make a call, he knows that he has to do something. Just as Hap is drawing his gun, Nichols, who is the leader of the gang, shows up and a fight ensues during which Hap is knocked unconscious. As the train approaches, Hap awakens and in a scuffle, gets the gun. The man at the dynamite plunger then is forced to push it too soon, causing the bridge to blow up prematurely and giving the train enough time to stop. The soldiers, including Joe, then hear shooting and go to the barn, where they find a wounded Hap, who salutes before falling unconscious. At a regiment assembly some time later, as Lawton pins a medal on a very proud Hap, the old cavalry man says that he has always thought that tanks were very practical.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.