Dr. Kildare's Victory (1942)

92 mins | Drama | February 1942

Director:

W. S. Van Dyke

Cinematographer:

William Daniels

Editor:

Frank E. Hull

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

A working title of the film was The Inside Story . The DV review listed a preview running time of 100 minutes. Although Samuel S. Hinds and Emma Dunn, who portrayed the parents of "Dr. Kildare" in the series, were listed in HR production charts, they were not in the released film. Ann Ayars, who portrayed "Cookie Charles," made her motion picture debut in the film. Dr. Kildare's Victory was the last of the "Dr. Kildare" films to be released and the last of the series to be completed by Lew Ayres. Shortly after the film was released, Ayres declared himself a conscientious objector to war and, as a result, was confined to an internment camp. News items in HR relate that "hundreds of bookings" of the picture were canceled and, because of protests, Loew's had ordered all of their film exchanges to grant cancellation requests. In early Apr 1941, HR news items relate that the "panic" had lessened, but that M-G-M was still concerned over the film's public reception. By mid-Apr 1941, Ayres had requested a change of status from conscientious objector to "non-combatant," and some newspapers, exhibitors and film industry personnel had expressed the view that a boycott of Ayres's films was "inconsistent with Americanism" and intolerant.
       Although Ayres's next released film, Fingers at the Window , apparently opened without problems, and Ayres joined the Army Medical Corps, the next film in the Dr. Kildare series was partially re-shot without Ayres. That film, which was released as Calling Dr. Gillespie , was initially shot with Ann Ayars reviving her ... More Less

A working title of the film was The Inside Story . The DV review listed a preview running time of 100 minutes. Although Samuel S. Hinds and Emma Dunn, who portrayed the parents of "Dr. Kildare" in the series, were listed in HR production charts, they were not in the released film. Ann Ayars, who portrayed "Cookie Charles," made her motion picture debut in the film. Dr. Kildare's Victory was the last of the "Dr. Kildare" films to be released and the last of the series to be completed by Lew Ayres. Shortly after the film was released, Ayres declared himself a conscientious objector to war and, as a result, was confined to an internment camp. News items in HR relate that "hundreds of bookings" of the picture were canceled and, because of protests, Loew's had ordered all of their film exchanges to grant cancellation requests. In early Apr 1941, HR news items relate that the "panic" had lessened, but that M-G-M was still concerned over the film's public reception. By mid-Apr 1941, Ayres had requested a change of status from conscientious objector to "non-combatant," and some newspapers, exhibitors and film industry personnel had expressed the view that a boycott of Ayres's films was "inconsistent with Americanism" and intolerant.
       Although Ayres's next released film, Fingers at the Window , apparently opened without problems, and Ayres joined the Army Medical Corps, the next film in the Dr. Kildare series was partially re-shot without Ayres. That film, which was released as Calling Dr. Gillespie , was initially shot with Ann Ayars reviving her role as Kildare's new "love interest," but her role was eliminated from the released film, along with Ayres's. For additional information on Ayres's career during this period, see the entries above and below for Calling Dr. Gillespie and Fingers at the Window . For additional information on the Dr. Kildare series, see the entry for Young Dr. Kildare in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.5251 and consult the Series Index. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Dec 1941.
---
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1941.
---
Film Daily
3 Dec 41
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Sep 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 41
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 41
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 41
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 42
p. 1, 5
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 42
p. 1, 4
Hollywood Reporter
8 Apr 42
p. 4, 14
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 42
p. 9.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Dec 41
p. 395.
New York Times
5 Feb 42
p. 25.
Variety
3 Dec 41
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
WRITERS
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Max Brand.
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
The Inside Story
Release Date:
February 1942
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 4 February 1942
Production Date:
early October--18 October 1941
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 November 1941
Copyright Number:
LP10882
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
92
Length(in feet):
8,306
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
7850
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On a busy night at Blair General Hospital in New York City, head nurse Molly Byrd returns from a three-week vacation and asks her staff about resident Dr. James Kildare, whose fiancée, nurse Mary Lamont, was killed the day before their wedding. Byrd is told that Kildare has been carrying on only because of his love of medicine. Head surgeon Dr. Leonard Gillespie, Kildare's wheelchair-bound mentor, is also concerned and orders him to take a night off, but instead Kildare accompanies his friend, intern Donald Winthrop, on an emergency ambulance call. During the ride, Kildare advises Donald to propose to his girl friend, nurse Annabelle Kirke, telling him that he himself was wrong to wait. After Kildare revives a suffocating infant on the emergency call, he sends Donald back to Blair. On the way, Donald, who, like Kildare is concerned over a territorial division with nearby Emerson hospital that can cause delays in emergency service, notices an accident and stops, even though it is not Blair's territory. He finds well-known society girl Cynthia "Cookie" Charles lying on the street, gravely injured by broken glass. Over the ambulance driver's objections, Donald takes Cookie to Blair, then, with Annabelle's compliance, omits the pickup address on the admittance card. Kildare performs a delicate operation to remove glass which has pierced Cookie's heart, and is successful. Shortly thereafter, Donald and Annabelle tell him that they are engaged, but are worried that Donald might be fired because of his deception on Cookie's admittance card. They soon hear from Blair administrator Walter Carew that the hospital's board is furious over a protest from Emerson. Gillespie and Kildare plead ... +


On a busy night at Blair General Hospital in New York City, head nurse Molly Byrd returns from a three-week vacation and asks her staff about resident Dr. James Kildare, whose fiancée, nurse Mary Lamont, was killed the day before their wedding. Byrd is told that Kildare has been carrying on only because of his love of medicine. Head surgeon Dr. Leonard Gillespie, Kildare's wheelchair-bound mentor, is also concerned and orders him to take a night off, but instead Kildare accompanies his friend, intern Donald Winthrop, on an emergency ambulance call. During the ride, Kildare advises Donald to propose to his girl friend, nurse Annabelle Kirke, telling him that he himself was wrong to wait. After Kildare revives a suffocating infant on the emergency call, he sends Donald back to Blair. On the way, Donald, who, like Kildare is concerned over a territorial division with nearby Emerson hospital that can cause delays in emergency service, notices an accident and stops, even though it is not Blair's territory. He finds well-known society girl Cynthia "Cookie" Charles lying on the street, gravely injured by broken glass. Over the ambulance driver's objections, Donald takes Cookie to Blair, then, with Annabelle's compliance, omits the pickup address on the admittance card. Kildare performs a delicate operation to remove glass which has pierced Cookie's heart, and is successful. Shortly thereafter, Donald and Annabelle tell him that they are engaged, but are worried that Donald might be fired because of his deception on Cookie's admittance card. They soon hear from Blair administrator Walter Carew that the hospital's board is furious over a protest from Emerson. Gillespie and Kildare plead Donald's case, but the board insists that Donald be fired. Kildare then goes to Cookie and asks her to save Donald by using her influence with the board. Meanwhile, Kildare cures little Helen Johnson, the daughter of a newspaperman, of diptheria. Feeling that he has no chance of remaining at Blair, Donald decides to go into private practice, but has no money. He is at first reluctant to let Annabelle help him by continuing to work after their marriage, but Kildare and Gillespie convince him that he is being silly. That same night, a cab driver rushes to the Blair receiving desk with a gravely ill passenger, but Annabelle refuses to admit him because the fare was picked up in Emerson territory. Not wanting to wait for an ambulance, the cabbie drives the man himself. Meanwhile, Kildare learns from Cookie that despite her best efforts, she has been unable to change the board's decision about Donald. Cookie, who is very attracted to Kildare, says that she lives on only a $90 weekly inheritance that is about to run out and is trying to find a "guy to protect me." Kildare is also attracted to Cookie, but his feelings for Mary prevent him from responding to her. A short time later, Kildare learns from Annabelle that she has been fired for refusing to admit the taxi passenger, who was dead on arrival at Emerson. Determined to help her and Donald, Kildare asks Johnson to write a feature article about their situation and the problem of territorial disputes between the two hospitals. The next day, Kildare is disappointed that the article does not appear in Johnson's paper. He is summoned to appear before Blair board member Baxter, who explains that he had learned about the article before it was printed and arranged for it to be killed. Baxter refuses to rescind either firing and temporarily suspends Kildare for his actions. Now Gillespie determines to help and goes to Cookie for assistance in getting the story out. The next morning, she calls Kildare to her room and shows him a front page story in another paper that relates the incident and adds that a new dispatch system has been set up between Blair and Emerson and Annabelle and Donald have been reinstated. Cookie then is released from the hospital, but tells Kildare that she will be back next week so he can see her scar. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.