The Barnstormer (1922)

Comedy-drama | January 1922

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HISTORY

The Summary for this unviewed film is based on reviews in the 4 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald, 11 Mar 1922 Motion Picture New, 1 Apr 1922 Moving Picture World, and 13 May 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review.
       A studio chart in the 16 Apr 1921 Camera noted that The Barnstormer was in its fourth week of production at his studio at 1425 Fleming Street in Hollywood, CA. Producer John M. Stahl was supervising editing at the time of a a 29 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News production briefing. The film was director-actor Charles Ray’s eighth feature for Associated First National Pictures, Inc.
       The 22 May 1922 FD listed The Barnstormer as playing at the Broadway Theatre on Broadway in New York City.
       Reviews were not favorable. The Jun 1922 issue of The Educational Screen called The Barnstormer one of the year’s “Ten Worst Productions (of those reviewed so far).” It called the film “So utterly bad that a first run theatre in America’s second largest city had to change the announced program after the public had suffered for two ... More Less

The Summary for this unviewed film is based on reviews in the 4 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald, 11 Mar 1922 Motion Picture New, 1 Apr 1922 Moving Picture World, and 13 May 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review.
       A studio chart in the 16 Apr 1921 Camera noted that The Barnstormer was in its fourth week of production at his studio at 1425 Fleming Street in Hollywood, CA. Producer John M. Stahl was supervising editing at the time of a a 29 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News production briefing. The film was director-actor Charles Ray’s eighth feature for Associated First National Pictures, Inc.
       The 22 May 1922 FD listed The Barnstormer as playing at the Broadway Theatre on Broadway in New York City.
       Reviews were not favorable. The Jun 1922 issue of The Educational Screen called The Barnstormer one of the year’s “Ten Worst Productions (of those reviewed so far).” It called the film “So utterly bad that a first run theatre in America’s second largest city had to change the announced program after the public had suffered for two days.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
16 Apr 1921
p. 11.
Exhibitors Herald
4 Mar 1922
p. 61.
Exhibitors Trade Review
25 Feb 1922
p. 891.
Exhibitors Trade Review
13 May 1922
p 1775.
Film Daily
22 May 1922
p. 4.
Motion Picture News
4 Jun 1921
p. 3448.
Motion Picture News
7 May 1921
p. 2940.
Motion Picture News
29 Oct 1921
p. 2352.
Motion Picture News
11 Mar 1922
p. 1500.
Moving Picture World
1 Apr 1922
p. 551.
The Educational Screen
Jun 1922
p. 203.
DETAILS
Release Date:
January 1922
Production Date:
began mid March 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Charles Ray Productions
Copyright Date:
20 February 1922
Copyright Number:
LP17558
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,300
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Joel Matthews, son of a prosperous farmer, is discontented with rustic life and longs for a career on the stage. When a touring theater troupe comes to town presenting the melodrama The Five Thieves, he lands a job as a utility man, hustling trunks, distributing handbills, playing tambourine, and performing bit parts. Traveling with the show, Joel develops a great admiration for the leading man, and imitates his every move. When the troupe settles for a week in a small town, Joel falls in love with Emily, the druggist’s beautiful daughter, and when the theater manager gives him a few speaking lines, the proud new actor invites her to the performance. During the show, a masked gunman holds up the audience and forces Joel to collect money and jewelry from his victims. After the robbery, Joel follows the thief into the leading man’s dressing room, discovers his idol is the crook, and, at gunpoint, forces him to return his plunder. Impressed, Emily asks Joel to stay in town. He wonders if life with her might be more exciting than success on the ... +


Joel Matthews, son of a prosperous farmer, is discontented with rustic life and longs for a career on the stage. When a touring theater troupe comes to town presenting the melodrama The Five Thieves, he lands a job as a utility man, hustling trunks, distributing handbills, playing tambourine, and performing bit parts. Traveling with the show, Joel develops a great admiration for the leading man, and imitates his every move. When the troupe settles for a week in a small town, Joel falls in love with Emily, the druggist’s beautiful daughter, and when the theater manager gives him a few speaking lines, the proud new actor invites her to the performance. During the show, a masked gunman holds up the audience and forces Joel to collect money and jewelry from his victims. After the robbery, Joel follows the thief into the leading man’s dressing room, discovers his idol is the crook, and, at gunpoint, forces him to return his plunder. Impressed, Emily asks Joel to stay in town. He wonders if life with her might be more exciting than success on the stage. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Show business


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.