Street of Chance (1942)

74 mins | Mystery | 1942

Director:

Jack Hively

Writer:

Garrett Fort

Producer:

Sol C. Siegel

Cinematographer:

Theodor Sparkuhl

Editor:

Arthur Schmidt

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Haldane Douglas

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Black Curtain . William Clemens was originally slated to direct, but because of illness was replaced by Jack Hively. According to a DV news item, Hively entered the Armed Forces upon completion of this film. He did not direct again until 1948. According to a HR news item, Henry Kraft, formerly Ray Milland's stand-in on Reap the Wild Wind , was cast in this film, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. The film is unrelated to Paramount's 1930 film of the same name (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Black Curtain . William Clemens was originally slated to direct, but because of illness was replaced by Jack Hively. According to a DV news item, Hively entered the Armed Forces upon completion of this film. He did not direct again until 1948. According to a HR news item, Henry Kraft, formerly Ray Milland's stand-in on Reap the Wild Wind , was cast in this film, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. The film is unrelated to Paramount's 1930 film of the same name (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.5437). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
3 Oct 1942.
---
Daily Variety
1 Oct 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Oct 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 42
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 42
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Oct 42
p. 933.
New York Times
19 Nov 42
p. 31.
Variety
30 Sep 42
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr to scr constr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus score
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Black Curtain by Cornell Woolrich (New York, 1941).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Black Curtain
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 18 November 1942
Production Date:
16 January--mid February 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 September 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11813
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
74
Length(in feet):
6,909
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8107
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

One afternoon, Frank Thompson is knocked unconscious by wreckage falling from a building on Tillary Street in New York City. When he revives, Frank is seriously disoriented although unharmed. Frank soon discovers that his apartment has been rented out for a year and his wife Virginia has been living on her own elsewhere. Frank confronts Virginia, who is shocked to see the husband who disappeared without explanation a year earlier. Virginia is thrilled to reunite with Frank, who has no memory of the past year, and he returns to his regular life. Soon, however, he is haunted by the appearance of Joe Marucci, a threatening looking police detective who follows Frank everywhere, and eventually breaks down the door to the apartment to arrest him. Frank and Virginia escape on the rooftops and he sends her home to her mother until he can clear up the mystery behind his missing year. By returning to Tillary Street, Frank hopes to jog his memory and is startled when Ruth Dillon, a beautiful blonde, hurries him into her apartment for his own protection. Ruth identifies Frank as her lover, known as Danny Nearing, with whom she worked as a servant at the Diedrich estate in Jericho County until Frank was accused of Harry Diedrich's murder. Convinced that he is innocent, Frank insists that Ruth accompany him as he searches the Diedrich estate for evidence. Ruth reluctantly accompanies him as he probes around the dark house. There Frank discovers that Grandma Diedrich, an elderly, mute invalid, witnessed the murder but was not consulted by the police. Harry's wife Alma and her lover, his brother Bill, return from ... +


One afternoon, Frank Thompson is knocked unconscious by wreckage falling from a building on Tillary Street in New York City. When he revives, Frank is seriously disoriented although unharmed. Frank soon discovers that his apartment has been rented out for a year and his wife Virginia has been living on her own elsewhere. Frank confronts Virginia, who is shocked to see the husband who disappeared without explanation a year earlier. Virginia is thrilled to reunite with Frank, who has no memory of the past year, and he returns to his regular life. Soon, however, he is haunted by the appearance of Joe Marucci, a threatening looking police detective who follows Frank everywhere, and eventually breaks down the door to the apartment to arrest him. Frank and Virginia escape on the rooftops and he sends her home to her mother until he can clear up the mystery behind his missing year. By returning to Tillary Street, Frank hopes to jog his memory and is startled when Ruth Dillon, a beautiful blonde, hurries him into her apartment for his own protection. Ruth identifies Frank as her lover, known as Danny Nearing, with whom she worked as a servant at the Diedrich estate in Jericho County until Frank was accused of Harry Diedrich's murder. Convinced that he is innocent, Frank insists that Ruth accompany him as he searches the Diedrich estate for evidence. Ruth reluctantly accompanies him as he probes around the dark house. There Frank discovers that Grandma Diedrich, an elderly, mute invalid, witnessed the murder but was not consulted by the police. Harry's wife Alma and her lover, his brother Bill, return from an interrogation by the district attorney and are surprised to find Ruth in the house on her day off. Frank hides in the greenhouse while Ruth cuts the phone wires so that the suspicious Diedrichs cannot call the police. The next night the Diedrichs go out and, unknown to Ruth and Frank, Joe watches their activities. Frank gets a few moments alone with Grandma and communicates with her through a code they have worked out with eyeblinks. Frank is shocked to learn from Grandma that Ruth is the real killer. When pressed, Ruth admits that she unintentionally stabbed Harry when he found her stealing money. Despite Ruth's pleas, Frank is unable to sympathize with her because she selfishly let him suffer the burden of the murder accusation in order to save herself. Ruth tries to kill Frank, and as they struggle for the gun, a shot is fired into Ruth. Joe comes into the house after the shot is fired and hears Ruth confess to the murder before she dies. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.