They All Kissed the Bride (1942)

85-86 mins | Romance, Comedy | 11 June 1942

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was He Kissed the Bride . HR news items yield the following information about this production: Richard Flournoy was originally assigned to write the screenplay, which was to have been a vehicle for Melvyn Douglas and Carole Lombard. After Lombard perished in a plane crash on 16 Jan 1942 while returning from a war bond rally, P. J. Wolfson was hired to rewrite the script to suit Joan Crawford. The film's end credits acknowledge that "Miss Crawford appears through the courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer." According to the Var review, Crawford donated her salary for the film to various charities, in memory of Lombard. According to a HR news item, cinematographer Joseph Walker used a special lavender lighting technique on Crawford to enhance the brilliance of her eyes. This was former Twentieth Century-Fox producer Edward Kaufman's first and only production for Columbia. Helen Parrish was borrowed from Universal to appear in the picture. According to the Var review, Crawford spoke the following line of dialogue: "When I want a sneak, I'll hire the best and get a Jap." The line was not in the viewed ... More Less

The working title of this film was He Kissed the Bride . HR news items yield the following information about this production: Richard Flournoy was originally assigned to write the screenplay, which was to have been a vehicle for Melvyn Douglas and Carole Lombard. After Lombard perished in a plane crash on 16 Jan 1942 while returning from a war bond rally, P. J. Wolfson was hired to rewrite the script to suit Joan Crawford. The film's end credits acknowledge that "Miss Crawford appears through the courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer." According to the Var review, Crawford donated her salary for the film to various charities, in memory of Lombard. According to a HR news item, cinematographer Joseph Walker used a special lavender lighting technique on Crawford to enhance the brilliance of her eyes. This was former Twentieth Century-Fox producer Edward Kaufman's first and only production for Columbia. Helen Parrish was borrowed from Universal to appear in the picture. According to the Var review, Crawford spoke the following line of dialogue: "When I want a sneak, I'll hire the best and get a Jap." The line was not in the viewed print. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Jun 1942.
---
Film Daily
9 Jun 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jan 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 42
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 42
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Jun 42
p. 697.
New York Times
31 Jul 42
p. 11.
Variety
3 Jun 42
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns for Miss Crawford
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby," words by Johnny Mercer, music by Harry Warren.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
He Kissed the Bride
Release Date:
11 June 1942
Production Date:
23 February--16 April 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
9 June 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11392
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85-86
Length(in feet):
7,843
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Margaret J. Drew, known as "M. J." by her intimidated employees, has taken over command of the vast Drew financial empire from her late father. When reporter Michael Holmes begins to publish exposes about Drew's tyrannical employment practices, the imperious M. J. demands that he be investigated. Mike, who has gleaned his information from his friend, Drew driver Johnny Johnson, is driving with Johnny one day when they see a woman whose car has broken down along the road. When Johnny pulls over to help the woman, she identifies herself as a Drew spotter and cites him for carrying a passenger and stopping his vehicle. Furious about M. J.'s unjust policies, Mike decides to crash the wedding of her younger sister Vivian. At the Drew estate, meanwhile, Vivian's protests that she is in love with filling station attendant Joe Krim are met with a cold heart and deaf ears by M. J., who insists that she proceed with her marriage to Stephen Pettingill, the scion of a steel family. When M. J. steps outside and sees Mike, her knees buckle, an affliction that strikes the female members of the Drew family whenever they are confronted by a man to whom they are attracted. Dismissing her wobbly knees as a "liver ailment," M. J. mistakes Mike for a bodyguard hired to patrol the ceremony. After drinking too much brandy during the wedding, Mike becomes inebriated and amorous, and when he eagerly kisses Vivian, M. J. thinks that he must be Joe and decides to expose him as a fortune hunter. Summoning Mike to her room, M. J. hands him $1,000 in marked bills. Failing ... +


Margaret J. Drew, known as "M. J." by her intimidated employees, has taken over command of the vast Drew financial empire from her late father. When reporter Michael Holmes begins to publish exposes about Drew's tyrannical employment practices, the imperious M. J. demands that he be investigated. Mike, who has gleaned his information from his friend, Drew driver Johnny Johnson, is driving with Johnny one day when they see a woman whose car has broken down along the road. When Johnny pulls over to help the woman, she identifies herself as a Drew spotter and cites him for carrying a passenger and stopping his vehicle. Furious about M. J.'s unjust policies, Mike decides to crash the wedding of her younger sister Vivian. At the Drew estate, meanwhile, Vivian's protests that she is in love with filling station attendant Joe Krim are met with a cold heart and deaf ears by M. J., who insists that she proceed with her marriage to Stephen Pettingill, the scion of a steel family. When M. J. steps outside and sees Mike, her knees buckle, an affliction that strikes the female members of the Drew family whenever they are confronted by a man to whom they are attracted. Dismissing her wobbly knees as a "liver ailment," M. J. mistakes Mike for a bodyguard hired to patrol the ceremony. After drinking too much brandy during the wedding, Mike becomes inebriated and amorous, and when he eagerly kisses Vivian, M. J. thinks that he must be Joe and decides to expose him as a fortune hunter. Summoning Mike to her room, M. J. hands him $1,000 in marked bills. Failing to recognize his nemesis, Mike kisses M. J., who then orders his arrest for blackmail. Upon discovering their error, M. J.'s attorney Marsh arranges Mike's release and warns her that the reporter could sue for false arrest. When Mike appears at her office to discuss the terms of an agreement, M. J.'s knees buckle and she excuses herself to visit the doctor. Becoming impatient, Mike gives his Brooklyn address to Marsh and instructs him to tell M. J. to meet him there that night. The doctor, meanwhile, prescribes sedatives to combat M.J.'s weak knees. That evening, M. J. goes to the Brooklyn address and is greeted by Johnny, Mike's neighbor, who has never met the head of Drew Enterprises and consequently mistakes M. J. for Mike's sweetheart. Before meeting Mike, M. J. swallows two pills, and soon after passes out. The next morning, M. J. is alarmed when she awakens in Mike's bed wearing his pajamas, but Mike assures her that Susie, Johnny's wife, put her to bed. Johnny then enters the room and provides Mike with more details about the company's injustices. Later that morning, M. J. surprises her employees when she strides into the office wearing the previous night's evening clothes. Vivian, who has returned early from her honeymoon, is waiting at the office to tell her sister that Steve was called back on business. As M. J. changes into her work clothes, Mike enters, addresses her as "Maggie," and offers to sign a release promising not to sue if she will have dinner with him. M. J. agrees, but after Mike signs the document, she conveniently remembers that she is busy, but then discovers that Mike has signed the release as "Benedict Arnold." That night, in a drenching rain storm, M. J. ventures to Brooklyn to keep her bargain with Mike, and Johnny tells her that Mike is at the Drew employees' dance and offers to drive her there. Along the way, Johnny is cited by one of the Drew company spies for carrying a passenger. At the dance, M. J. finds Mike and asks to keep her dinner date with him. When the dance contest is announced, however, Johnny grabs M. J. as his partner and begins wildly jitterbugging with her. Crane, the head of Drew personnel, is shocked to see his boss on the dance floor and awards her first prize. After the dance, Mike, M. J., Susie and Johnny return to the apartment and get drunk. When Johnny insists upon driving the inebriated M. J. home, they all pile into the truck, and Mike climbs into the driver's seat and kisses M. J. After pulling into the Drew driveway, Mike escorts M. J. into her house while the watchman informs the astonished Johnny that his friend Maggie is really M. J. Drew. When M. J. tries to seduce Mike, he resists and then passes out. At the office the next morning, M. J. learns from Crane that Johnny and eleven other drivers have been fired for taking their trucks to the dance, and Crane listens in disbelief when M. J. orders them rehired and granted a five dollar raise. Back at the house, meanwhile, Mike awakens wearing the cook's nightgown and is relieved to discover that the butler put him to bed. Soon after, Johnny barges into the bedroom and blames Mike for the drivers' firing. Mrs. Drew, M. J.'s addle-brained mother, then enters and asks Mike to lend Steve $30,000 so that he can reopen his family's steel mill and bid on a defense contract. After extracting a promise from Steve that he will hire all the drivers, Mike agrees to the loan and proceeds to M. J.'s office, where he offers to sign the release in exchange for $30,000. Feeling betrayed, M. J. accepts his terms and then attends a business meeting. Unable to keep her mind on her speech, M. J. finds her thoughts interrupted by images of blissful domesticity and after adjourning the meeting, she hurries to see the doctor, who diagnoses her as being lovesick. Returning home to chair a stockholders' meeting, M. J. is confronted by her mother, who tells her that Mike gave Steve the $30,000 to hire the drivers. Finally realizing that she is in love with Mike, M. J. hurries to Brooklyn but Johnny and the other drivers refuse to let her see him. Susie then arrives and tells M. J. that Mike is waiting for Johnny to pick him up. Soon after, Johnny meets Mike and instructs him to climb in the back of the truck and close the door. When one of the Drew spies spots the truck, M. J. opens the doors and tells Johnny to drive to the nearest minister. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.