Pardon My Sarong (1942)

83-84 mins | Comedy | 7 August 1942

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HISTORY

This was Bud Abbott and Lou Costello's first film upon returning to Universal after their free-lance performances in the M-G-M film Rio Rita (See Entry). It was also the first film produced by Jules Levey's Mayfair Productions, Inc. for Universal under an agreement announced in a Sep 1941 HR news item, in which Mayfair was designated as producer for all future Abbott and Costello films made at Universal. Despite this new agreement between Universal and Mayfair, Alex Gottlieb was retained as associate producer, a position he had held on previous Abbott and Costello films. With Pardon My Sarong , Erle C. Kenton replaced Arthur Lubin as director of the Abbott and Costello series. Numerous contemporary reviews point out that this film was a parody of the Dorothy Lamour "Sarong" films made at Paramount, such as Aloma of the South Seas (See Entry.) HR reported that portions of the film were shot on location in Balboa, CA in mid-Mar 1942.
       Early HR production charts include Maria Montez in the cast, though she does not appear in the final film. For a three-week period, HR production charts mistakenly listed George Robinson as the picture's director of photography, Richard H. Riedel as the associate art director and Milton Carruth as the film editor. According to modern sources, screenwriter True Boardman claimed that the plot of this film was confusing because after he would carefully work out a plot sequence of about twelve pages, and submit them to co-screenwriter John Grant, Grant would add gags and comedy routines to the material, while removing ... More Less

This was Bud Abbott and Lou Costello's first film upon returning to Universal after their free-lance performances in the M-G-M film Rio Rita (See Entry). It was also the first film produced by Jules Levey's Mayfair Productions, Inc. for Universal under an agreement announced in a Sep 1941 HR news item, in which Mayfair was designated as producer for all future Abbott and Costello films made at Universal. Despite this new agreement between Universal and Mayfair, Alex Gottlieb was retained as associate producer, a position he had held on previous Abbott and Costello films. With Pardon My Sarong , Erle C. Kenton replaced Arthur Lubin as director of the Abbott and Costello series. Numerous contemporary reviews point out that this film was a parody of the Dorothy Lamour "Sarong" films made at Paramount, such as Aloma of the South Seas (See Entry.) HR reported that portions of the film were shot on location in Balboa, CA in mid-Mar 1942.
       Early HR production charts include Maria Montez in the cast, though she does not appear in the final film. For a three-week period, HR production charts mistakenly listed George Robinson as the picture's director of photography, Richard H. Riedel as the associate art director and Milton Carruth as the film editor. According to modern sources, screenwriter True Boardman claimed that the plot of this film was confusing because after he would carefully work out a plot sequence of about twelve pages, and submit them to co-screenwriter John Grant, Grant would add gags and comedy routines to the material, while removing plot development and reducing the sequence to "about three pages." Modern sources also state that Sharky, the seal was actually named Charley, the seal. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Aug 1942.
---
Daily Variety
31 Jul 42
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Aug 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 41
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 41
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 41
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 42
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 42
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Aug 42
p. 825.
New York Herald Tribune
27 Aug 1942.
---
New York Times
27 Aug 42
p. 15.
Variety
5 Aug 42
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus supv
SOUND
[Sd] tech
DANCE
Dances originated and staged by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Lovely Luana," "Vingo Jingo" and "Island of the Moon," words and music by Don Raye and Gene de Paul
"Do I Worry," words and music by Stanley Cowan and Bobby North
"Java Jive," words and music by Milton Drake and Ben Oakland
+
SONGS
"Lovely Luana," "Vingo Jingo" and "Island of the Moon," words and music by Don Raye and Gene de Paul
"Do I Worry," words and music by Stanley Cowan and Bobby North
"Java Jive," words and music by Milton Drake and Ben Oakland
"Shout, Brother, Shout," words and music by Clarence Williams.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 August 1942
Production Date:
2 March--28 April 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
21 July 1942
Copyright Number:
LP11466
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83-84
Length(in feet):
7,565
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8496
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Officials of the Chicago Municipal Bus Company are worried that cross-town bus 5111, driven by Algy Shaw and Wellington Phlug, has been stolen. In fact, the bus is on its way to Los Angeles with playboy Tommy Layton and his bevy of beauties aboard. Arriving at the Seaside Yachting Club, the group relaxes until private detective Kendall enters and arrests the two bus drivers for grand theft. The drivers manage to escape the detective, then sneak into a nearby theater where they hide in the dressing room of Marco the Magician. Disguised as Marco, Algy burns up the arrest warrant, with the assistance of the dumbfounded detective. Back at the club, Tommy mistakenly kisses Joan Marshall, the sister of his main competitor in an upcoming yacht race, and she accuses him of stealing her brother's crew. Meanwhile, Kendall re-captures the two bus drivers, but Wellington makes a wrong turn on the way back to Chicago, and the bus ends up in the Los Angeles harbor. Later, Tommy learns that Joan has tricked his crew into returning to her brother's ship. In return, he abducts her and hires the fugitive bus drivers to work as his crew. Once at sea, Tommy asks Joan to declare a truce, only to discover that she has rigged the compass and that they are hundreds of miles off course. After ten days lost at sea, the quartet finds land. The group explores the island, and the bus drivers find a native village. Wellington is mistaken by the villagers for the "hero" who will help them re-conquer their haunted temple in the mountains, and Luana, Chief Kolua's daughter, tells Wellington that he ... +


Officials of the Chicago Municipal Bus Company are worried that cross-town bus 5111, driven by Algy Shaw and Wellington Phlug, has been stolen. In fact, the bus is on its way to Los Angeles with playboy Tommy Layton and his bevy of beauties aboard. Arriving at the Seaside Yachting Club, the group relaxes until private detective Kendall enters and arrests the two bus drivers for grand theft. The drivers manage to escape the detective, then sneak into a nearby theater where they hide in the dressing room of Marco the Magician. Disguised as Marco, Algy burns up the arrest warrant, with the assistance of the dumbfounded detective. Back at the club, Tommy mistakenly kisses Joan Marshall, the sister of his main competitor in an upcoming yacht race, and she accuses him of stealing her brother's crew. Meanwhile, Kendall re-captures the two bus drivers, but Wellington makes a wrong turn on the way back to Chicago, and the bus ends up in the Los Angeles harbor. Later, Tommy learns that Joan has tricked his crew into returning to her brother's ship. In return, he abducts her and hires the fugitive bus drivers to work as his crew. Once at sea, Tommy asks Joan to declare a truce, only to discover that she has rigged the compass and that they are hundreds of miles off course. After ten days lost at sea, the quartet finds land. The group explores the island, and the bus drivers find a native village. Wellington is mistaken by the villagers for the "hero" who will help them re-conquer their haunted temple in the mountains, and Luana, Chief Kolua's daughter, tells Wellington that he must marry her, much to the chagrin of Whaba, her warrior suitor. Meanwhile, Tommy and Joan find the hut of Varnoff, a treasure-hunter pretending to be an archaeologist. Varnoff and his gang then plot to use the shipwrecked quartet in order to rob the haunted temple of its sacred jewels. After Varnoff's men fake a volcanic eruption, Wellington is ordered to prove himself by entering the temple. At the same time, Tommy and Joan search Varnoff's hut and discover his true occupation. The two are captured, however, before they can warn the others. Wellington, too, is captured by Varnoff's men as he enters the temple, and they demand that he give them Kolua's sacred ruby. Wellington manages to escape his captors, and with Algy's aid, knocks most of the crooks unconscious. Meanwhile, Tommy and Joan break free of their bindings, but when Tommy gets into a struggle with Varnoff, Joan mistakenly hits the playboy in the head and is taken captive once more. Wellington sees Varnoff escaping in a small motorboat with Jane and gives chase. Using the sharp end of a swordfish as a weapon, Wellington jumps into the boat and apprehends the treasure-hunter. As the quartet prepares to return home, Luana gives Wellington a "thank you" kiss, making him so hot that steam rises when he jumps in the water. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.