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HISTORY

While the film’s title and main character are listed as “Beau Brummel,” the surname of the actual historical figure was spelled “Brummell.”
       On 28 Oct 1922, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Harry M. Warner had purchased film rights to the popular Clyde Fitch stage play, Beau Brummell. Although the 22 Feb 1923 Var announced that production was expected to begin immediately following star John Barrymore’s return from Europe that spring, several changes in the crew precipitated a delay. A 24 Feb 1923 Motion Picture News article stated that Mary O’Hara had been hired to write continuity, with Sidney Franklin attached to direct. That summer, news items in the 19 May 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review and 19 Aug 1923 FD indicated that O’Hara had been replaced by Frances Marion, and directorial duties assumed by Harry Beaumont. While Beaumont remained with the project, Dorothy Farnum receives sole credit for the final script. Production was scheduled to begin in early Sep 1923.
       A few months later, Exhibitors Trade Review stated that filming was underway and progressing at “top-speed.” By 19 Jan 1924, Moving Picture World reported that the project was in post-production, but editing was to be delayed at least at week while Beaumont recovered from complications with his eyesight.
       The 22 Mar 1924 Motion Picture News announced that Beau Brummel had its world premiere the previous week at the California Theatre in Los Angeles, CA, with an extended run to follow at the nearby Miller’s Theatre. A 21 Mar 1924 FD item stated that ... More Less

While the film’s title and main character are listed as “Beau Brummel,” the surname of the actual historical figure was spelled “Brummell.”
       On 28 Oct 1922, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Harry M. Warner had purchased film rights to the popular Clyde Fitch stage play, Beau Brummell. Although the 22 Feb 1923 Var announced that production was expected to begin immediately following star John Barrymore’s return from Europe that spring, several changes in the crew precipitated a delay. A 24 Feb 1923 Motion Picture News article stated that Mary O’Hara had been hired to write continuity, with Sidney Franklin attached to direct. That summer, news items in the 19 May 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review and 19 Aug 1923 FD indicated that O’Hara had been replaced by Frances Marion, and directorial duties assumed by Harry Beaumont. While Beaumont remained with the project, Dorothy Farnum receives sole credit for the final script. Production was scheduled to begin in early Sep 1923.
       A few months later, Exhibitors Trade Review stated that filming was underway and progressing at “top-speed.” By 19 Jan 1924, Moving Picture World reported that the project was in post-production, but editing was to be delayed at least at week while Beaumont recovered from complications with his eyesight.
       The 22 Mar 1924 Motion Picture News announced that Beau Brummel had its world premiere the previous week at the California Theatre in Los Angeles, CA, with an extended run to follow at the nearby Miller’s Theatre. A 21 Mar 1924 FD item stated that the New York City opening was scheduled to take place 30 Mar 1924 the Strand Theatre, while the 26 Mar 1924 Var announced Warner Bros. Pictures’ intention to continue bookings on a “road show” across several other states.
       Voted one of the “Top Best Features” of 1924 by the 1929 Film Daily Year Book, as reported in the Feb 7, 1930 FD.
       Another film inspired by the Clyde Fitch play was produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1954. That film, titled Beau Brummell (see entry), was directed by Curtis Bernhardt and starred Stewart Granger and Elizabeth Taylor. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Oct 1922
p. 1405.
Exhibitors Trade Review
19 May 1923
p. 1217.
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Nov 1923
p. 1143.
Film Daily
19 Aug 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
21 Mar 1924
p. 2.
Film Daily
7 Feb 1930
p. 8.
Motion Picture News
24 Feb 1923
p. 933.
Motion Picture News
22 Mar 1924
p. 1307.
Moving Picture World
19 Jan 1924
p. 187.
New York Times
31 Mar 1924
p. 20.
Variety
22 Feb 1923
p. 47.
Variety
26 Mar 1924
p. 22.
Variety
24 Apr 1924
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros. "Classic of the Screen"
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Elec eff
FILM EDITOR
VISUAL EFFECTS
Tech dir
Tech dir
Art titles
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Beau Brummell by Clyde Fitch (New York, 17 May 1890) and historical data by special arrangement with Mrs. Richard Mansfield.
DETAILS
Release Date:
March 1924
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: week of 16 March 1924
New York premiere: 30 March 1924
New York opening: 15 March or 4 December 1924
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 March 1924
Copyright Number:
LP19998
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
9,900
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

British Army officer George Bryan Brummell decides to become a "beau" and lead a reckless bachelor's life after he sees his sweetheart, Lady Margery, forced to marry Lord Alvanley. He wins the friendship of the Prince of Wales, leaves his regiment, and becomes one of Europe's taste-makers. His insolence and his indiscretions with the ladies of the court make enemies, and he falls into disfavor. After escaping his creditors to France, he eventually dies there in poverty, deserted by all but his servant, ... +


British Army officer George Bryan Brummell decides to become a "beau" and lead a reckless bachelor's life after he sees his sweetheart, Lady Margery, forced to marry Lord Alvanley. He wins the friendship of the Prince of Wales, leaves his regiment, and becomes one of Europe's taste-makers. His insolence and his indiscretions with the ladies of the court make enemies, and he falls into disfavor. After escaping his creditors to France, he eventually dies there in poverty, deserted by all but his servant, Mortimer. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.