The Pony Express (1907)

Western | 15 June 1907

Production Company:

Kalem Co.
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HISTORY

An advertisement in the 15 Jun 1907 Moving Picture World ran the following description: “The Pony Express Rider is one of the great figures in the history of the West. Before the advent of the railroads his duty was to carry the mails through the wilderness harassed on every side by Indians and Highwaymen. In this production the hero is entrusted with a packet of money to carry to a distant point. The hand of the ranchman’s daughter is to be his reward for safe delivery. A band of Mexican vaqueros waylays him, and the packet is stolen. The hero is saved by his faithful horse and rides back to give the alarm. The cowboys are aroused, and a posse starts in pursuit. After a thrilling chase, the villain is captured and money recovered, and the hero triumphs.” The advertisement boasted: “Nine big scenes with cartoon titles, i.e.—1. The Pony Express Rider and his horse Silver Heels. 2. Cowboys vs. Greasers. 3 The $10,000 packet. 4. Rendezvous of the Greasers. 5. The Ambuscade. 6. Mexican Revenge—Saved by Silver Heels. 7. The Alarm. 8. The Chase. 9. The Express Rider wins his Bride.”
       The Kalem Company was founded in New York City in early 1907. Its founders, according to the 8 Jun 1907 Moving Picture World, were Chicago, IL-based film distributor George Kleine (president), and former Biograph employees Samuel Long (vice president) and Biograph Frank. J. Marion (secretary-treasurer). The company name was the initials of their last names: K, L. and M. Kalem’s plant and headquarters were at 131 W. Twenty-fourth Street in New York, and its first studio was located in Stamford, CN. ...

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An advertisement in the 15 Jun 1907 Moving Picture World ran the following description: “The Pony Express Rider is one of the great figures in the history of the West. Before the advent of the railroads his duty was to carry the mails through the wilderness harassed on every side by Indians and Highwaymen. In this production the hero is entrusted with a packet of money to carry to a distant point. The hand of the ranchman’s daughter is to be his reward for safe delivery. A band of Mexican vaqueros waylays him, and the packet is stolen. The hero is saved by his faithful horse and rides back to give the alarm. The cowboys are aroused, and a posse starts in pursuit. After a thrilling chase, the villain is captured and money recovered, and the hero triumphs.” The advertisement boasted: “Nine big scenes with cartoon titles, i.e.—1. The Pony Express Rider and his horse Silver Heels. 2. Cowboys vs. Greasers. 3 The $10,000 packet. 4. Rendezvous of the Greasers. 5. The Ambuscade. 6. Mexican Revenge—Saved by Silver Heels. 7. The Alarm. 8. The Chase. 9. The Express Rider wins his Bride.”
       The Kalem Company was founded in New York City in early 1907. Its founders, according to the 8 Jun 1907 Moving Picture World, were Chicago, IL-based film distributor George Kleine (president), and former Biograph employees Samuel Long (vice president) and Biograph Frank. J. Marion (secretary-treasurer). The company name was the initials of their last names: K, L. and M. Kalem’s plant and headquarters were at 131 W. Twenty-fourth Street in New York, and its first studio was located in Stamford, CN. Kalem’s films were distinguished by “cartoon” subtitles “drawn by a celebrated newspaper artist.” After ten years of filmmaking, Kalem was sold to Vitagraph in 1917.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Moving Picture World
8 Jun 1907
p. 223.
Moving Picture World
15 Jun 1907
p. 226ta, 237tr, 238tl.
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Pony Express Rider
Release Date:
15 June 1907
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
880
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

“A cowboy and his horse are usually inseparable companions, and an affection grows up between them rivaling that of a dog for his master. This is fully shown in the scene where the pony, Silverheels, is receiving the caress of his cowboy master, and, as well as he can do so, returning it. The post-office of a prosperous settlement, and near by the mines of a prosperous claim, are seen, around which diggers with machinery are busily engaged. The owner of the mines appears with his daughter and is respectfully greeted by the group of men, who are preparing to leave work for the day. An express boy mail carrier on his pony is seen advancing; he throws the bag of mail to the postmaster and, dismounting, turns toward the girl, who, advancing with delight, is clasped in his arms, by way of welcome. Disengaging himself, he hastens into the post office to finish his duties, leaving the girl with the employees of her father. A Greaser leader rides rapidly towards the group and, dismounting, staggers round. Seeing the girl, he makes advances toward her, which she resents. This reception angers him, and he seizes her in his arms, attempting to kiss her. Her screams bring her lover to the scene. He punishes the insult and knocks the man down, who on rising draws a revolver and causes the men to hold up their hands. The cowboy is being overpowered when the father of the girl comes to his assistance and the Greaser is driven off, vowing vengeance as he goes. (More)”—15 Jun 1907 Moving Picture World ...

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“A cowboy and his horse are usually inseparable companions, and an affection grows up between them rivaling that of a dog for his master. This is fully shown in the scene where the pony, Silverheels, is receiving the caress of his cowboy master, and, as well as he can do so, returning it. The post-office of a prosperous settlement, and near by the mines of a prosperous claim, are seen, around which diggers with machinery are busily engaged. The owner of the mines appears with his daughter and is respectfully greeted by the group of men, who are preparing to leave work for the day. An express boy mail carrier on his pony is seen advancing; he throws the bag of mail to the postmaster and, dismounting, turns toward the girl, who, advancing with delight, is clasped in his arms, by way of welcome. Disengaging himself, he hastens into the post office to finish his duties, leaving the girl with the employees of her father. A Greaser leader rides rapidly towards the group and, dismounting, staggers round. Seeing the girl, he makes advances toward her, which she resents. This reception angers him, and he seizes her in his arms, attempting to kiss her. Her screams bring her lover to the scene. He punishes the insult and knocks the man down, who on rising draws a revolver and causes the men to hold up their hands. The cowboy is being overpowered when the father of the girl comes to his assistance and the Greaser is driven off, vowing vengeance as he goes. (More)”—15 Jun 1907 Moving Picture World

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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