Brass Knuckles (1927)

68 mins | Melodrama | 3 December 1927

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HISTORY

According to "studio briefs" in the 28 Oct 1927 Motion Picture News, the title of Monte Blue's new film was changed from The Comeback to Brass Knuckles, perhaps because Pathé Exchange had released another film called The Fighting Comeback several months earlier (see entry). ...

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According to "studio briefs" in the 28 Oct 1927 Motion Picture News, the title of Monte Blue's new film was changed from The Comeback to Brass Knuckles, perhaps because Pathé Exchange had released another film called The Fighting Comeback several months earlier (see entry).

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
25 Dec 1927
---
Motion Picture News
28 Oct 1927
p. 1341
Variety
21 Dec 1927
p. 25
Variety
22 Feb 1928
p. 25
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Comeback
Release Date:
3 December 1927
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
27 November 1927
LP24701
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68
Length(in feet):
6,330
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

During an attempted prison break, "Fade-away" Joe kills the warden and is sentenced to death. Lamont's term is prolonged, and he swears vengeance on Zac Harrison, who is entrusted with a letter to Joe's daughter, June. Zac and Velvet, when freed, call at an orphanage to see June, who then cherishes the kindness Zac brings her and runs away to join them. Velvet gives in to thievery, but Zac induces him to go straight. On her birthday, Velvet takes June to an underworld cafe in some "grown-up" clothes, provoking Zac's anger but bringing the realization that he loves her. Lamont, released from prison, informs the vice squad of their "immoral" relationship, and Zac is jailed; when released, he finds that Lamont, as her "father," has taken June into his custody. Zac is forced to tell her the truth about her father ... but all ends ...

More Less

During an attempted prison break, "Fade-away" Joe kills the warden and is sentenced to death. Lamont's term is prolonged, and he swears vengeance on Zac Harrison, who is entrusted with a letter to Joe's daughter, June. Zac and Velvet, when freed, call at an orphanage to see June, who then cherishes the kindness Zac brings her and runs away to join them. Velvet gives in to thievery, but Zac induces him to go straight. On her birthday, Velvet takes June to an underworld cafe in some "grown-up" clothes, provoking Zac's anger but bringing the realization that he loves her. Lamont, released from prison, informs the vice squad of their "immoral" relationship, and Zac is jailed; when released, he finds that Lamont, as her "father," has taken June into his custody. Zac is forced to tell her the truth about her father ... but all ends happily.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.