Broadway After Midnight (1927)

Melodrama | October 1927

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HISTORY

The title was listed in the 19 Apr 1927 Film Daily as one of several upcoming productions for Krellberg Pictures Corp., recently founded by Sherman S. Krellberg. Former Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer executive Bud Barsky was identified as the company’s vice-president and general manager. The start of principal photography was reported in the 10 Aug 1927 Film Daily. Both partners had since been included in the company’s revised name, Krelbar Pictures Corp.
       Broadway After Midnight was released to the states’ rights markets in Nov 1927, according to the 15 Sep 1928 Motion Picture News. However, listings in the 23 Oct 1927 [Detroit, MI] Detroit Free Press and the 26 Oct 1927 [Lebanon, PA] Lebanon Daily News indicated that the film may have been released sooner. New York City openings followed on 31 Oct 1927 at the Tivoli Theatre in Brooklyn, and on 22 Nov 1927 at Loew’s New York Theatre on Broadway.
       The 11 Nov 1927 Film Daily noted that the picture was one of six current releases that had been rejected by the Ohio censorship board, which claimed that it set a bad example for children. A review in the 13 Nov 1927 issue basically agreed, stating that it was inappropriate for “juvenile” audiences.
       The phrase, “Broadway After Midnight,” was used as a tagline for the 1926 Fox Film Corp. release, Hell’s 400 (see entry). ...

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The title was listed in the 19 Apr 1927 Film Daily as one of several upcoming productions for Krellberg Pictures Corp., recently founded by Sherman S. Krellberg. Former Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer executive Bud Barsky was identified as the company’s vice-president and general manager. The start of principal photography was reported in the 10 Aug 1927 Film Daily. Both partners had since been included in the company’s revised name, Krelbar Pictures Corp.
       Broadway After Midnight was released to the states’ rights markets in Nov 1927, according to the 15 Sep 1928 Motion Picture News. However, listings in the 23 Oct 1927 [Detroit, MI] Detroit Free Press and the 26 Oct 1927 [Lebanon, PA] Lebanon Daily News indicated that the film may have been released sooner. New York City openings followed on 31 Oct 1927 at the Tivoli Theatre in Brooklyn, and on 22 Nov 1927 at Loew’s New York Theatre on Broadway.
       The 11 Nov 1927 Film Daily noted that the picture was one of six current releases that had been rejected by the Ohio censorship board, which claimed that it set a bad example for children. A review in the 13 Nov 1927 issue basically agreed, stating that it was inappropriate for “juvenile” audiences.
       The phrase, “Broadway After Midnight,” was used as a tagline for the 1926 Fox Film Corp. release, Hell’s 400 (see entry).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Detroit Free Press
23 Oct 1927
p. 59
Detroit Free Press
25 Oct 1927
p. 4
Film Daily
19 Apr 1927
p. 8
Film Daily
10 Aug 1927
p. 8
Film Daily
11 Nov 1927
p. 2
Film Daily
13 Nov 1927
p. 11
Film Daily
21 Nov 1927
p. 2
Film Daily Year Book
1928
p. 186
Green Bay Press-Gazette [Green Bay, WI]
22 May 1926
p. 5
Lebanon Daily News [Lebanon PA]
26 Oct 1927
p. 7
Motion Picture News
15 Sep 1928
p. 888
Times Union [Brooklyn, NY]
30 Oct 1927
p. 39
DETAILS
Release Date:
October 1927
Premiere Information:
Detroit and Lebanon, PA, openings: week of 23 Oct 1927; New York opening: 22 Nov 1927
Production Date:
began late Jul/early Aug 1927
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,199
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

After being forced to marry gangster Quill Burke to protect her brother, nightclub entertainer Queenie Morgan is further pressured into impersonating Gloria Livingston, a socialite who has strayed into the underworld and shot her betrayer, Bodo Lambert. The real Gloria is killed after the gang attempts to obtain money from her parents, and the police trace both killings to Queenie. She is tried for murder, but as the jury is about to deliver a guilty verdict, her maid rushes into the courtroom and reveals the truth. Queenie is released to the waiting arms of her true love, Jimmy ...

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After being forced to marry gangster Quill Burke to protect her brother, nightclub entertainer Queenie Morgan is further pressured into impersonating Gloria Livingston, a socialite who has strayed into the underworld and shot her betrayer, Bodo Lambert. The real Gloria is killed after the gang attempts to obtain money from her parents, and the police trace both killings to Queenie. She is tried for murder, but as the jury is about to deliver a guilty verdict, her maid rushes into the courtroom and reveals the truth. Queenie is released to the waiting arms of her true love, Jimmy Crestmore.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.