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HISTORY

Broken Hearts of Hollywood was announced in the 1 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World as an upcoming Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., production, set to star Patsy Ruth Miller and Kenneth Harlan. The 8 Aug 1925 issue noted that Roy Del Ruth was on board to direct. The current iteration of the story was said to have been written by Gregory Rogers , while the screenplay was to be written by Darryl F. Zanuck. (In fact, “Gregory Rogers ” was an alias used by Zanuck.) All twenty-six of Warners’ contract players, and the German shepherd Rin-Tin-Tin, were set to be featured in the film, according to an 18 Aug 1925 Los Angeles Evening Express item. Personally supervising the production was Bennie Zeidman . Due to the actors’ varying schedules, filming was expected to progress slowly, as stated in the 26 Sep 1925 Motion Picture News.
       The following actors and actresses were identified as cast members in the 19 Aug 1925 Var: Marie Prevost, Irene Rich, Louise Fazenda, Dorothy Devore, June Marlowe, Dolores and Helene Costello, Alice Calhoun, Myrna Loy, Monte Blue, Sydney Chaplin, Huntly Gordon, Willard Louis, John Roche, John Harron, John Patrick, Matt Moore, Clive Brooke, Gayne Whitman, Charles Conklin , Don Alvarado, and Charles Farrell.
       On 24 Feb 1926, a Var article announced that James Flood had been brought on to direct, replacing Roy Del Ruth. Shortly after, the 13 Mar 1926 Moving Picture World noted Philip Klein and E. T. Lowe, Jr. (a.k.a. Edward T. Lowe, Jr.) were hired to write the screenplay, based on Gregory Rogers ’s story. Flood was quickly replaced by ...

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Broken Hearts of Hollywood was announced in the 1 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World as an upcoming Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., production, set to star Patsy Ruth Miller and Kenneth Harlan. The 8 Aug 1925 issue noted that Roy Del Ruth was on board to direct. The current iteration of the story was said to have been written by Gregory Rogers , while the screenplay was to be written by Darryl F. Zanuck. (In fact, “Gregory Rogers ” was an alias used by Zanuck.) All twenty-six of Warners’ contract players, and the German shepherd Rin-Tin-Tin, were set to be featured in the film, according to an 18 Aug 1925 Los Angeles Evening Express item. Personally supervising the production was Bennie Zeidman . Due to the actors’ varying schedules, filming was expected to progress slowly, as stated in the 26 Sep 1925 Motion Picture News.
       The following actors and actresses were identified as cast members in the 19 Aug 1925 Var: Marie Prevost, Irene Rich, Louise Fazenda, Dorothy Devore, June Marlowe, Dolores and Helene Costello, Alice Calhoun, Myrna Loy, Monte Blue, Sydney Chaplin, Huntly Gordon, Willard Louis, John Roche, John Harron, John Patrick, Matt Moore, Clive Brooke, Gayne Whitman, Charles Conklin , Don Alvarado, and Charles Farrell.
       On 24 Feb 1926, a Var article announced that James Flood had been brought on to direct, replacing Roy Del Ruth. Shortly after, the 13 Mar 1926 Moving Picture World noted Philip Klein and E. T. Lowe, Jr. (a.k.a. Edward T. Lowe, Jr.) were hired to write the screenplay, based on Gregory Rogers ’s story. Flood was quickly replaced by Millard Webb, as indicated the 6 May 1926 Film Daily, which claimed that Webb had already been replaced by Lloyd Bacon. Later that month, the 29 May 1926 Motion Picture News referred to Broken Hearts of Hollywood as the “latest of the Warner productions to go into work.” Zanuck was again credited with the screenplay, said to be based on a story by E. T. Lowe, Jr., and Phil Klein.
       Production was delayed when Patsy Ruth Miller became “seriously ill” after a tonsillectomy, as reported in a 26 May 1926 Var brief. Eleanor Boardman and Pauline Starke were mentioned in the 21 May 1926 LAT as possible replacements for Miller. The next day’s LAT added that June Caprice had recently been screen tested. However, the 6 Jun 1926 New York Daily News reported that Miller had returned to set a week after her operation. Filming ended the week of 12 Jul 1926, according to the 17 Jul 1926 Motion Picture News.
       In addition to shooting on the Warner Bros. studio lot in Hollywood, CA, some scenes were filmed on location at Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood, as noted in the 7 Aug 1926 Motion Picture News, which printed a production still image taken at the location. The same day’s issue of Exhibitors Herald identified Louella Parsons, Sid Grauman, Bess Meredyth, and Ethel Barrymore as actors who appeared in the Grauman scenes. Ethel’s brother, John Barrymore, was also in the film, as well as Flora Snyder, according to items in the 12 Jul 1926 [Elmira, NY] Star-Gazette and 28 Aug 1926 Exhibitors Herald. Additionally, the 4 Sep 1926 Exhibitors Herald identified Nick Musuraca as a cameraman.
       Prior to theatrical release on 14 Aug 1926, a serialized version of the film’s story, written by Edward Clark, was published in newspapers. The first installment ran in the 26 May 1926 [Mansfield, OH] Mansfield News, among other publications.
       This film is extant, according to the Library of Congress American Silent Film Survival Database.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Atchison Sunday Globe [Atchison, KS]
30 Aug 1925
p. 6
Educational Screen
Nov 1926
p. 546
Exhibitors Herald
7 Aug 1926
p. 30
Exhibitors Herald
28 Aug 1926
p. 70
Exhibitors Herald
4 Sep 1926
p. 52
Film Daily
24 Aug 1925
p. 5
Film Daily
17 Mar 1926
p. 2
Film Daily
6 May 1926
p. 2
Film Daily
19 Jul 1926
p. 7
Film Daily
10 Oct 1926
p. 6
Film Mercury
30 Apr 1926
p. 12
Los Angeles Evening Express
18 Aug 1925
p. 8
Los Angeles Times
13 Aug 1925
p. 27
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1925
p. 62
Los Angeles Times
30 Aug 1925
p. 63
Los Angeles Times
25 Apr 1926
p. 62
Los Angeles Times
20 May 1926
p. 26
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1926
p. 26
Los Angeles Times
22 May 1926
p. 24
Mansfield News [Mansfield, OH]
21 May 1926
p. 21
Mansfield News [Mansfield, OH]
26 May 1926
p. 8
Motion Picture
Sep 1926
p. 69
Motion Picture News
12 Sep 1925
p. 1296
Motion Picture News
26 Sep 1925
p. 1480
Motion Picture News
31 Oct 1925
p. 2085
Motion Picture News
3 Apr 1926
p. 1503
Motion Picture News
8 May 1926
p. 2183
Motion Picture News
22 May 1926
p. 2497
Motion Picture News
29 May 1926
p. 2562
Motion Picture News
12 Jun 1926
p. 2755
Motion Picture News
26 Jun 1926
p. 2961
Motion Picture News
3 Jul 1926
p. 40
Motion Picture News
17 Jul 1926
p. 216, 218
Motion Picture News
24 Jul 1926
p. 305
Motion Picture News
7 Aug 1926
p. 478
Motion Picture News
14 Aug 1926
p. 617
Motion Picture News
30 Oct 1926
p. 1677
Motion Picture News
6 Nov 1926
p. 1771
Motion Picture News Booking Guide
Oct 1926
p. 23
Moving Picture World
1 Aug 1925
p. 497, 543
Moving Picture World
8 Aug 1925
p. 655
Moving Picture World
13 Mar 1926
p. 98
Moving Picture World
16 Oct 1926
p. 437
New York Daily News
22 May 1926
p. 153
New York Daily News
31 May 1926
p. 23
New York Daily News
6 Jun 1926
p. 50
Picture-Play
Sep 1926
pp. 27-28, 53
San Francisco Examiner
25 Jun 1926
p. 17
Star-Gazette [Elmira, NY]
12 Jul 1926
p. 18
Times-Union [Brooklyn, NY]
26 Aug 1926
p. 9
Variety
19 Aug 1925
p. 31
Variety
24 Feb 1926
p. 36
Variety
12 May 1926
p. 61
Variety
26 May 1926
p. 4
Variety
14 Jul 1926
p. 10, 12
Variety
25 Aug 1926
p. 6
Variety
1 Sep 1926
p. 6
Variety
15 Sep 1926
p. 6
Variety
6 Oct 1926
pp. 42-43
Variety
13 Oct 1926
p. 6
Variety
20 Oct 1926
p. 60
Washington Post
26 Sep 1926
Section F, p. 3
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 August 1926
Production Date:
ca. May--Jul 1926
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
14 August 1926
LP23032
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,770
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Virginia Perry leaves her husband and child to return to Hollywood; but having dissipated her beauty and seeking solace in drink, she soon finds herself another "has been" on the fringe of movie circles. Her daughter, Betty Anne, wins a national beauty contest, and en route to Hollywood she meets Hal, another contest winner; both fail in their first screen attempts and turn to Marshall, an unscrupulous trickster, who enrolls them in his acting school. Molly, a movie extra, induces Betty Anne to attend a wild party; she is arrested in a raid; and Hal, to raise the money for her bail, takes a "stunt" job in which he is badly hurt. Betty Anne seeks the aid of star actor McLain, who obtains for her the leading female role in his next film; Virginia, who is cast as her mother, keeps silent about their relationship until the film is completed. Apprehensive for her daughter's safety, she shoots Marshall while in a drunken stupor and is arrested. At the trial, Betty Anne's testimony saves her mother, who is then happily united with her daughter and ...

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Virginia Perry leaves her husband and child to return to Hollywood; but having dissipated her beauty and seeking solace in drink, she soon finds herself another "has been" on the fringe of movie circles. Her daughter, Betty Anne, wins a national beauty contest, and en route to Hollywood she meets Hal, another contest winner; both fail in their first screen attempts and turn to Marshall, an unscrupulous trickster, who enrolls them in his acting school. Molly, a movie extra, induces Betty Anne to attend a wild party; she is arrested in a raid; and Hal, to raise the money for her bail, takes a "stunt" job in which he is badly hurt. Betty Anne seeks the aid of star actor McLain, who obtains for her the leading female role in his next film; Virginia, who is cast as her mother, keeps silent about their relationship until the film is completed. Apprehensive for her daughter's safety, she shoots Marshall while in a drunken stupor and is arrested. At the trial, Betty Anne's testimony saves her mother, who is then happily united with her daughter and Hal.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.