Chasing Rainbows (1930)

90 mins | Musical comedy | 10 January 1930

Director:

Charles F. Reisner

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Editor:

George Hively

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The original working title of this film was The Road Show. However, the title was changed due to a competing project, also titled The Road Show, to be directed by James Cruze. The latter was ultimately released as The Great Gabbo (1929, see entry). A 4 December 1929 Film Daily advertisement referred to this film by its new title, Happy Days. However, conflict arose when Fox Film Corp. claimed rights to that title for its 1930 release of the same name (see entry). A final title change to Chasing Rainbows was reported in the 18 December 1929 Variety.
       Pre-production was underway by late April 1929, when a news brief in the 24 April 1929 Variety stated that Milton Ager and Jack Yellen were at work on the lyrics and melodies. Filming commenced by mid-June 1929, according to the 15 June 1929 Hollywood Filmograph. Production was likely based at MGM’s studio in Culver City, CA, as indicated by the 3 August 1929 Hollywood Filmograph.
       Sammy Lee, who had previously collaborated with director Charles F. Reisner on The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1929, see entry), staged and choreographed two of the film’s “most colorful stage spectacles,” the 31 August 1929 Hollywood Filmograph noted. Those numbers were “Everybody Tap” and “Happy Days Are Here Again.” Prior to filming, Lee had reportedly worked with the chorus for two months.
       Theatrical release took place on 10 January 1930. A review in the 2 November 1929 Motion Picture News claimed that Chasing ...

More Less

The original working title of this film was The Road Show. However, the title was changed due to a competing project, also titled The Road Show, to be directed by James Cruze. The latter was ultimately released as The Great Gabbo (1929, see entry). A 4 December 1929 Film Daily advertisement referred to this film by its new title, Happy Days. However, conflict arose when Fox Film Corp. claimed rights to that title for its 1930 release of the same name (see entry). A final title change to Chasing Rainbows was reported in the 18 December 1929 Variety.
       Pre-production was underway by late April 1929, when a news brief in the 24 April 1929 Variety stated that Milton Ager and Jack Yellen were at work on the lyrics and melodies. Filming commenced by mid-June 1929, according to the 15 June 1929 Hollywood Filmograph. Production was likely based at MGM’s studio in Culver City, CA, as indicated by the 3 August 1929 Hollywood Filmograph.
       Sammy Lee, who had previously collaborated with director Charles F. Reisner on The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1929, see entry), staged and choreographed two of the film’s “most colorful stage spectacles,” the 31 August 1929 Hollywood Filmograph noted. Those numbers were “Everybody Tap” and “Happy Days Are Here Again.” Prior to filming, Lee had reportedly worked with the chorus for two months.
       Theatrical release took place on 10 January 1930. A review in the 2 November 1929 Motion Picture News claimed that Chasing Rainbows had been conceived as a successor to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.’s 1929 release, The Broadway Melody (see entry), also co-starring Bessie Love and Charles King. The 2 March 1930 Los Angeles Times later claimed that critics were finding this film’s “values somewhat thinned by its resemblance to ‘The Broadway Melody.’” Some said the current market had been flooded by similar releases, including Reisner’s The Hollywood Revue of 1929, and actor Charles King was quoted in the 23 March 1930 Los Angeles Times as saying that the release of Chasing Rainbows had come too late. The actor stated, “Had this been released at the same time as ‘[The ] Broadway Melody,’ it would have been a bigger hit. But now it suffers in comparison.”
       While on a tour promoting the songs that Milton Ager and Jack Yellen wrote for the picture, their manager, James B. Eggert, died in an airplane crash, as reported in the 1 February 1930 Motion Picture News. Soon after, the 19 Feburary 1930 Variety announced that one of those songs, “Happy Days Are Here Again,” was enjoying great popularity and added that some fans were incorrectly associating it with the Fox film, Happy Days. The item supposed that the film’s box-office draw could have been greatly helped by a coordinated release of “Happy Days Are Here Again,” stating: “Had this song been released three months ago, long enough to catch hold of the picture fans nationally and then change the title of the picture from ‘Chasing Rainbows’ to ‘Happy Days,’ no doubt but what the picture would have had a ready made audience mounting into the millions anxious to see the picture before it could be released.” “Happy Days Are Here Again” grew more popular in 1932 when Franklin Delano Roosevelt used it as the campaign song for his first presidential campaign. The song went on to be recorded many times, including a notable release from Barbra Streisand in 1962.
       An advertisement for scenarist Richard Schayer in the 8 January 1930 Variety included Chasing Rainbows (referred to as The Road Home) among his recent credits; however, Schayer does not appear to have been credited on the final film.
       Although two sequences of this picture were shot in Technicolor, those sequences were lost, as noted in various contemporary sources including the 2 April 2010 [Salt Lake City, UT] Deseret.. An incomplete version of the film, without the Technicolor sequences, is extant, and was distributed by Warner Bros. on DVD.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Deseret News [Salt Lake City, UT]
2 Apr 2010
Section W, p. 1
Film Daily
4 Dec 1929
p. 2
Film Daily
10 Dec 1929
p. 9
Film Daily
23 Feb 1930
---
Hollywood Filmograph
15 Jun 1929
p. 33
Hollywood Filmograph
29 Jun 1929
p. 25
Hollywood Filmograph
3 Aug 1929
p. 29
Hollywood Filmograph
31 Aug 1929
p. 14
Los Angeles Times
30 Jun 1929
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Aug 1929
Section B, p. 10
Los Angeles Times
2 Mar 1930
Section B, p. 11
Los Angeles Times
23 Mar 1930
Section B, p. 13
Motion Picture News
2 Nov 1929
p. 93
Motion Picture News
30 Nov 1929
p. 25
Motion Picture News
1 Feb 1930
p. 29
Motion Picture News
8 Feb 1930
p. 103
New York Times
22 Dec 1929
---
New York Times
22 Feb 1930
p. 13, 19
Variety
3 Apr 1929
p. 17
Variety
24 Apr 1929
p. 56
Variety
18 Dec 1929
p. 21
Variety
1 Jan 1930
p. 14
Variety
8 Jan 1930
p. 258
Variety
19 Feb 1930
p. 61
Variety
26 Feb 1930
p. 35, 49
Variety
26 Mar 1930
p. 38
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Adpt
Robert Hopkins
Dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus and lyrics
Mus and lyrics
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
Interpolations
SOUND
Rec eng
Rec eng
Sd asst
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Happy Days are Here Again," "Poor But Honest," "My Dynamic Personality," "Everybody Tap," "Lucky Me, Lovable You" and "I Got a Feeling For You," words by Jack Yellen, music by Milton Ager; "Love Ain't Nothin' But the Blues," words by Joe Goodwin, music by Louis Alter; "Do I Know What I'm Doing?" words and music by Leo Robin, Sam Coslow and Richard A. Whiting.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Happy Days
The Road Show
Release Date:
10 January 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
6 January 1930
LP975
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black & white with color sequences
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,100
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Carlie and Terry constitute a vaudeville team in a traveling musical show; also in the company are Eddie, the stage manager; Bonnie, a comedienne; and Polly, the wardrobe mistress. Terry's habit of constantly falling in love with the leading lady causes him to marry Daphne, a two-timing songstress. When he finds her with another man, Eddie threatens to kill himself, but his little partner reassures him that "Happy Days Are Here Again," and the show goes ...

More Less

Carlie and Terry constitute a vaudeville team in a traveling musical show; also in the company are Eddie, the stage manager; Bonnie, a comedienne; and Polly, the wardrobe mistress. Terry's habit of constantly falling in love with the leading lady causes him to marry Daphne, a two-timing songstress. When he finds her with another man, Eddie threatens to kill himself, but his little partner reassures him that "Happy Days Are Here Again," and the show goes on.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Citizen Kane

This film's end credits begin with the statement, “Most of the principal actors in Citizen Kane are new to motion pictures. The Mercury Theatre is proud ... >>

Double Indemnity

James M. Cain's novel Double Indemnity was serialized in Liberty magazine. Although Joseph Sistrom is listed as producer in various contemporary sources, the SAB at ... >>

Cheating the Public

The story was originally entitled ... >>

Cover Up

This film's working title was Some Rain Must Fall . According to a NYT news item dated 20 Jun 1948, when Dennis O'Keefe reported for work ... >>

A Change of Seasons

According to a 20 Apr 1979 DV news item, a working title for the film was Consenting Adults.
       The following acknowledgements appear at the end ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.