Chasing the Moon (1922)

Comedy-drama, Western | 26 February 1922

Director:

Edward Sedgwick

Cinematographer:

Benjamin Kline

Editor:

Ralph Spence

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Chasing the Moon was a change of pace for the popular rugged Western star, and critics and theater owners were generally not happy about it. Reviewers uniformly mentioned the “wise cracking,” “facetious,” and “wittiest” subtitles, written by Ralph Spence, but felt there were too many of them. As for story, the 5 Feb 1922 FD reviewer complained that the “helter skelter” film had “a whole lot of everything and not much of anything.” The 25 Feb 1922 Exhibitors Herald concluded: “The average picture-goer will not find much plot….It is a series of Mix stunts loosely connected.” A theater manager in Fort Plain, NY, told the 14 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald that Chasing the Moon “pleased about 75 per cent [of the audience]. Not up to Mix standard from our point of view,” while another manager, in Tecumseh, MI, stated: “Worst star has ever made. No story and the patrons commented on the same. A few more like this one and good-bye Mix.” Still, Tom Mix had his devoted followers. As a Nashville, TN, theater owner reported to the 28 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald, “As usual a packed house all the week on Tom Mix. Not as good as some he has made, but full of snappy action, and the subtitles, oh, boy, they're there.” ... More Less

Chasing the Moon was a change of pace for the popular rugged Western star, and critics and theater owners were generally not happy about it. Reviewers uniformly mentioned the “wise cracking,” “facetious,” and “wittiest” subtitles, written by Ralph Spence, but felt there were too many of them. As for story, the 5 Feb 1922 FD reviewer complained that the “helter skelter” film had “a whole lot of everything and not much of anything.” The 25 Feb 1922 Exhibitors Herald concluded: “The average picture-goer will not find much plot….It is a series of Mix stunts loosely connected.” A theater manager in Fort Plain, NY, told the 14 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald that Chasing the Moon “pleased about 75 per cent [of the audience]. Not up to Mix standard from our point of view,” while another manager, in Tecumseh, MI, stated: “Worst star has ever made. No story and the patrons commented on the same. A few more like this one and good-bye Mix.” Still, Tom Mix had his devoted followers. As a Nashville, TN, theater owner reported to the 28 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald, “As usual a packed house all the week on Tom Mix. Not as good as some he has made, but full of snappy action, and the subtitles, oh, boy, they're there.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
25 Feb 1922
p. 60.
Exhibitors Herald
14 Oct 1922
p. 70.
Exhibitors Herald
28 Oct 1922
p. 79.
Film Daily
5 Feb 1922
p. 13.
Moving Picture World
18 Feb 1922
p. 754.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 February 1922
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
26 February 1922
Copyright Number:
LP17636
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,092
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dwight Locke, a blasé millionaire who has seen and done everything, gives a party for his ranch hands at a city restaurant. His fiancée, Jane Norworth, sees him there with a chorus girl and later upbraids him for not being a worker like her brother Milton, a chemist. When Dwight breaks a glass distillation bottle in Milton's laboratory and cuts his hand, he learns that it contains a poison that will kill in thirty days unless offset by an antidote known only to Professor Sulphite, who has sailed for Russia. Dwight takes up the chase to find the professor within the time limit, with adventures aboard horses, ships, carriages, and trains. Meanwhile, Milton discovers that the container did not contain poison and that Dwight will die if he takes the antidote, so he and Jane pursue Dwight until they find him in Spain. There the lovers are ... +


Dwight Locke, a blasé millionaire who has seen and done everything, gives a party for his ranch hands at a city restaurant. His fiancée, Jane Norworth, sees him there with a chorus girl and later upbraids him for not being a worker like her brother Milton, a chemist. When Dwight breaks a glass distillation bottle in Milton's laboratory and cuts his hand, he learns that it contains a poison that will kill in thirty days unless offset by an antidote known only to Professor Sulphite, who has sailed for Russia. Dwight takes up the chase to find the professor within the time limit, with adventures aboard horses, ships, carriages, and trains. Meanwhile, Milton discovers that the container did not contain poison and that Dwight will die if he takes the antidote, so he and Jane pursue Dwight until they find him in Spain. There the lovers are united. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.