Rosalie (1937)

122 mins | Musical | 24 December 1937

Director:

W. S. Van Dyke

Cinematographer:

Oliver T. Marsh

Editor:

Blanche Sewell

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Additional music used briefly in various segments of the film included, "The Polovetzian Dances" by Alexander Borodon; "M'Apari," from the opera Martha, by Friedrich Flowtow; "Stars and Stripes Forever" by John Phillip Sousa; "Oh, Promise Me" by Reginald De Koven and Clement Scott; "The Caissons Go Rolling Along" by Edmund L. Gruber; and, "Anchors Away" by Charles A. Zimmerman, Alfred A. Miles and Royal Lovell. Frank Morgan recreated his role from the Broadway production of the play, which was produced by Florenz Ziegfeld and starred Marilyn Miller in the title role. Although the play was a musical, an entirely new score was written for the film. A production chart in HF on 24 May 1930 listed an M-G-M film entitled Rosalie "in preparation." That film was to star Marion Davies and be directed by Robert Z. Leonard. It is possible that the planned 1930 production was also to be based on the Broadway play, however, no additional information on its history has been located. According to news items in HR, George Gershwin was initially sought to compose the score for the film, which Cole Porter eventually wrote, and Roy Del Ruth was signed to direct the picture but asked to be released from the assignment to rest after completing work on M-G-M's Broadway Melody of 1938. (see entry). Portions of the film were shot on location at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York; however, footage of the Army-Navy game came from newsreels. According to a 20 Dec 1937 HR news item, "frantic cutting" was required ...

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Additional music used briefly in various segments of the film included, "The Polovetzian Dances" by Alexander Borodon; "M'Apari," from the opera Martha, by Friedrich Flowtow; "Stars and Stripes Forever" by John Phillip Sousa; "Oh, Promise Me" by Reginald De Koven and Clement Scott; "The Caissons Go Rolling Along" by Edmund L. Gruber; and, "Anchors Away" by Charles A. Zimmerman, Alfred A. Miles and Royal Lovell. Frank Morgan recreated his role from the Broadway production of the play, which was produced by Florenz Ziegfeld and starred Marilyn Miller in the title role. Although the play was a musical, an entirely new score was written for the film. A production chart in HF on 24 May 1930 listed an M-G-M film entitled Rosalie "in preparation." That film was to star Marion Davies and be directed by Robert Z. Leonard. It is possible that the planned 1930 production was also to be based on the Broadway play, however, no additional information on its history has been located. According to news items in HR, George Gershwin was initially sought to compose the score for the film, which Cole Porter eventually wrote, and Roy Del Ruth was signed to direct the picture but asked to be released from the assignment to rest after completing work on M-G-M's Broadway Melody of 1938. (see entry). Portions of the film were shot on location at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York; however, footage of the Army-Navy game came from newsreels. According to a 20 Dec 1937 HR news item, "frantic cutting" was required on the film after a 16 Dec 1937 preview; however, reviews from that preview list a running time of 123 minutes, and the running time after release was 122 minutes, suggesting only a slight altering of the lengthy film.
       According to a Life magazine article on the picture, and various news items, the set constructed for the "Rosalie" production number cost over $200,000 and used $30,000 worth of electricity. Over sixty acres were needed to construct the set and over 1,500 extras were used in the biggest night scene ever filmed to that time. Wardrobe people worked over four weeks to make costumes to accomodate all of the extras. A studio press release noted that two hundred actual West Point cadets appeared with Powell in one number and each received a kiss from the star. Rosalie was one of the top twenty box office films of the year. Vienna Opera Company star Ilona Massey made her motion picture debut in the film. An ad in HR on 24 Dec 1937 gives special thanks to a number of the film's production crew and advisors. Among the persons listed whose exact contributions to the film have not been determined include, William Lewis, Florence Thomas, Harry Albies , Harold Thurburg, Tommy Griffin, James Harper, Charles Salerno, Hezi Tate, Bob Barnes, Lt. Fred Thompson and Ira Heyman. Modern sources add the following cast members: Al Shean (Herman Schmidt) and Katharine Aldridge (Lady in Waiting).

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Dec 1937
p. 3
Film Daily
15 Dec 1937
p. 7
Film Daily
22 Dec 1937
p. 5
HF
24 May 1930
p. 24
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jun 1937
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 1937
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 1937
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1937
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 1937
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 1937
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1937
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
24 Dec 1937
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jan 1938
p. 1
International Photographer
1 Jan 1938
pp. 24-26
Motion Picture Daily
18 Dec 1937
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
6 Nov 1937
pp. 34-35
Motion Picture Herald
25 Dec 1937
pp. 38-39
New York Times
31 Dec 1937
p. 9
Variety
22 Feb 1937
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A William Anthony McGuire Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
W. S. Van Dyke II
Dir
William Scully
Asst dir
Asst dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
2d cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Joseph Wright
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Georgie Stoll
Mus cond
Mus presentation
Mus arr
Orch and vocal arr
Orch and vocal arr
Orch and vocal arr
Orch and vocal arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Mont eff
DANCE
Dances and ensembles created by
Dance dir for Cadet routines
Asst to Dave Gould for Cadet routines
Asst dance dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Chief elec
Head grip
Still photog
STAND INS
Singing voice double for Eleanor Powell
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the musical Rosalie , book by William Anthony McGuire and Guy Bolton, music by George Gershwin and Sigmund Romberg, lyrics by P. G. Wodehouse and Ira Gershwin (New York, 10 Jan 1928).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
+
SONGS
"In the Still of the Night," "Close," "Rosalie," "Show Me the Town," "Why Should I Care?" "I've a Strange New Rhythm in My Heart," "On, Brave Old Army Team," "To Love or Not to Love," "Spring Love Is in the Air," "Who Knows," "National Anthem" and "It's All Over But the Shouting," words and music by Cole Porter.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 December 1937
Production Date:
30 Aug--6 Nov 1937
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
20 December 1937
LP 7706
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
122
Length(in reels):
13
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3837
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Princess Rosalie of Romanza, secretly enrolled at Vassar, has a crush on West Point football star Dick Thorpe, though she pretends to dislike him. They fall in love, but their romance is interrupted when her father summons her home to marry Prince Paul, who really loves Rosalie's friend Brenda. After Rosalie reluctantly returns home, Dick flies his private plane solo across the Atlantic, hoping to keep a rendezvous with Rosalie, who has said that she will be dressed as "Pierrette" during a Romanzan festival. Meanwhile, his friend, Bill Delroy, sails to Europe but tries to impress his girl friend Mary Callahan by saying that he, too, was in the plane. At the festival, Rosalie performs a magnificent dance dressed as Pierrette, and Dick recognizes her. However, when Dick learns that she is not only a princess, but engaged to marry Prince Paul, he leaves the country. That same night a revolution erupts and the royal family escapes. When they learn that the revolt has been quelled, however, they plan to return soon to Romanza. In the United States, the royal family visits West Point and Rosalie demands that Dick be her official escort, even though he is about to be expelled from school for being absent without leave. Rosalie cannot convince him that she wants to abdicate until, with the Bill's help, she disguises herself as a cadet and meets him in the garden to confirm what Brenda has told him, that Prince Paul and Rosalie are not in love. Meanwhile, young Mickey, the school mascot, visits the affable king, disguised as the monarch's pet dummy and convinces him to abdicate ...

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Princess Rosalie of Romanza, secretly enrolled at Vassar, has a crush on West Point football star Dick Thorpe, though she pretends to dislike him. They fall in love, but their romance is interrupted when her father summons her home to marry Prince Paul, who really loves Rosalie's friend Brenda. After Rosalie reluctantly returns home, Dick flies his private plane solo across the Atlantic, hoping to keep a rendezvous with Rosalie, who has said that she will be dressed as "Pierrette" during a Romanzan festival. Meanwhile, his friend, Bill Delroy, sails to Europe but tries to impress his girl friend Mary Callahan by saying that he, too, was in the plane. At the festival, Rosalie performs a magnificent dance dressed as Pierrette, and Dick recognizes her. However, when Dick learns that she is not only a princess, but engaged to marry Prince Paul, he leaves the country. That same night a revolution erupts and the royal family escapes. When they learn that the revolt has been quelled, however, they plan to return soon to Romanza. In the United States, the royal family visits West Point and Rosalie demands that Dick be her official escort, even though he is about to be expelled from school for being absent without leave. Rosalie cannot convince him that she wants to abdicate until, with the Bill's help, she disguises herself as a cadet and meets him in the garden to confirm what Brenda has told him, that Prince Paul and Rosalie are not in love. Meanwhile, young Mickey, the school mascot, visits the affable king, disguised as the monarch's pet dummy and convinces him to abdicate so that he and Rosalie can be happy living in America. The queen is horrified, but the king is adamant. Rosalie and Dick are then married.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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