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HISTORY

According to the 26 Jun 1927 FD, Frederick and Fanny Hatton were writing the script for The Crystal Cup. However, neither is listed in credits. ...

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According to the 26 Jun 1927 FD, Frederick and Fanny Hatton were writing the script for The Crystal Cup. However, neither is listed in credits.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
26 Jun 1927
p. 6
Film Daily
9 Oct 1927
---
New York Times
25 Oct 1927
p. 33
Variety
26 Oct 1927
p. 19
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Mort Blumenstock
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Crystal Cup by Gertrude Franklin Atherton (New York, 1925).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 October 1927
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
13 September 1927
LP24396
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,386
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

As the result of an early and brutal seduction, Gita Carteret, a wealthy young heiress, develops an intense dislike for men. She dresses in clothes of extreme masculine cut, wears short hair, and abandons all feminine mannerisms. Fulfilling a promise to her dying grandmother, Gita attends a fashionable ball at the Pleydens, clad in proper feminine attire, where she finds herself the object of the attentions of John Blake, a successful novelist, and his friend Dr. Geoffrey Pelham. Warned by Mrs. Pleyden of gossip associating Gita with Blake, Gita decides to marry him "in name only," and he reluctantly agrees. While Blake is working on a novel, she develops an intimate friendship with Pelham but is frightened by her attraction to him. Blake's longing overwhelms his former caution in winning her love, and when he enters her room at night, the terrified Gita shoots him. Dying, he realizes that Pelham is the only man who can awaken the feminine in her nature and asks him to marry ...

More Less

As the result of an early and brutal seduction, Gita Carteret, a wealthy young heiress, develops an intense dislike for men. She dresses in clothes of extreme masculine cut, wears short hair, and abandons all feminine mannerisms. Fulfilling a promise to her dying grandmother, Gita attends a fashionable ball at the Pleydens, clad in proper feminine attire, where she finds herself the object of the attentions of John Blake, a successful novelist, and his friend Dr. Geoffrey Pelham. Warned by Mrs. Pleyden of gossip associating Gita with Blake, Gita decides to marry him "in name only," and he reluctantly agrees. While Blake is working on a novel, she develops an intimate friendship with Pelham but is frightened by her attraction to him. Blake's longing overwhelms his former caution in winning her love, and when he enters her room at night, the terrified Gita shoots him. Dying, he realizes that Pelham is the only man who can awaken the feminine in her nature and asks him to marry her.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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