The Cowboy Millionaire (1909)

Comedy, Western | 21 October 1909

Directors:

Otis Turner, Frank Boggs

Producer:

William N. Selig

Production Company:

Selig Polyscope Co.
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HISTORY

Sources vary about whether Tom Mix appeared in The Cowboy Millionaire.
       The 6 Nov 1909 Moving Picture World ran the following review: "If a good cowboy picture is wanted, Selig is the one to produce it. His company can make a cowboy play seem like the real thing, and this film is no exception. The cowboy who becomes a millionaire is a novelty which will prove attractive, because it is out of the ordinary. His life in his luxurious city surroundings palls on him, and for the fun of it he sends for the whole outfit from Circle D ranch, and when they arrive the fun begins. It is rough-house, but is picturesque, filled with vigorous action, and therefore pleasing to a majority of the audiences. The fortunate man sees the comparison and loses his longing for the old life of the plains and the bucking bronchos.” ...

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Sources vary about whether Tom Mix appeared in The Cowboy Millionaire.
       The 6 Nov 1909 Moving Picture World ran the following review: "If a good cowboy picture is wanted, Selig is the one to produce it. His company can make a cowboy play seem like the real thing, and this film is no exception. The cowboy who becomes a millionaire is a novelty which will prove attractive, because it is out of the ordinary. His life in his luxurious city surroundings palls on him, and for the fun of it he sends for the whole outfit from Circle D ranch, and when they arrive the fun begins. It is rough-house, but is picturesque, filled with vigorous action, and therefore pleasing to a majority of the audiences. The fortunate man sees the comparison and loses his longing for the old life of the plains and the bucking bronchos.”

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
FILM DOPE
Mar 1990
no. 44
Motion Picture News
21 Oct 1916
Section 2, p. 122, 179
Moving Picture World
16 Oct 1909
p. 518ada
Moving Picture World
23 Oct 1909
p. 558ada, 583ts, 588tl
Moving Picture World
6 Nov 1909
p. 643r
New York Clipper
23 Oct 1909
p. 939tl, 939ts, 854ta
NYDM
16 Oct 1909
p. 40ta
NYDM
23 Oct 1909
p. 40ta
NYDM
30 Oct 1909
pp. 14-15r
NYDM
13 Sep 1911
p. 23
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Fell Heir to a Million Dollars
Release Date:
21 October 1909
Production Date:

Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
1,000
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

"Bud Noble, a handsome specimen of manhood, is foreman on the Circle 'D' ranch outside of Circle City, Idaho, and our opening scene pictures Bud as the cowboy roping and tying a steer. With its bucking bronchos, pitching mustangs, bucking steers, and the biggest novelty ever, the acme of all thrillers, 'see Bud bulldog a steer.' Only three men have successfully accomplished this feat and lived to tell about it. Then Bud receives a shock. The local operator appears with a telegram. 'Your Uncle John dead. You are sole heir to his estate valued at several millions. Come to Chicago at once.' The astounded cowboys tumble over with sheer amazement. Bud buys, and the scene closes with a characteristic rush for the bar. 'One year later' Bud tires of society. We see Bud and his new wife entertaining, and our cowboy shows plainly that he is desperately weary of the effete East, then Bud goes to the club and the men he meets there and their conversation is getting on his nerves. 'After the theater' a return home and Bud longs for the fresh air of the vast West. As he sinks wearily into a chair, a Remington painting catches his eye. It is one he had recently purchased, a broncho buster and his locoed horse. The artist had caught the wild spirit of his subject, and as Bud's mind returns to scenes of a similar nature, a happy inspiration comes. 'By Jove, I'll do it.' He seizes a telegraph blank, rings for his butler, and sends the following message: 'Col. Dalton, Foreman, Circle 'D' Ranch, This high-brow life is killing me. Am sending you special train. Bring the ...

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"Bud Noble, a handsome specimen of manhood, is foreman on the Circle 'D' ranch outside of Circle City, Idaho, and our opening scene pictures Bud as the cowboy roping and tying a steer. With its bucking bronchos, pitching mustangs, bucking steers, and the biggest novelty ever, the acme of all thrillers, 'see Bud bulldog a steer.' Only three men have successfully accomplished this feat and lived to tell about it. Then Bud receives a shock. The local operator appears with a telegram. 'Your Uncle John dead. You are sole heir to his estate valued at several millions. Come to Chicago at once.' The astounded cowboys tumble over with sheer amazement. Bud buys, and the scene closes with a characteristic rush for the bar. 'One year later' Bud tires of society. We see Bud and his new wife entertaining, and our cowboy shows plainly that he is desperately weary of the effete East, then Bud goes to the club and the men he meets there and their conversation is getting on his nerves. 'After the theater' a return home and Bud longs for the fresh air of the vast West. As he sinks wearily into a chair, a Remington painting catches his eye. It is one he had recently purchased, a broncho buster and his locoed horse. The artist had caught the wild spirit of his subject, and as Bud's mind returns to scenes of a similar nature, a happy inspiration comes. 'By Jove, I'll do it.' He seizes a telegraph blank, rings for his butler, and sends the following message: 'Col. Dalton, Foreman, Circle 'D' Ranch, This high-brow life is killing me. Am sending you special train. Bring the whole outfit, band, horses and all. This town needs excitement. Come and help wake it up. BUD.' A few days later, we see the boys at a swell suburban depot: Bud and his wife in their auto, and the punchers in chaps and sombreros soon create a world of excitement on the city streets. Then Bud takes the boys yachting; next to see a melodrama, where the Colonel takes exceptions to the villain's heartless treatment of 'Bertha, the Sewing Machine Girl.' Bud, either send those horrid creatures back where they came from or I get a divorce,' declares Mrs. Bud. So the boys are next seen in a palatial café car homeward bound. The Colonel gets into an argument with the colored cook and that worthy dives through an open car window to escape the cowboy's wrath. Our closing scene is in the cozy home of the millionaire. He and his wife are enjoying a quiet tete-a-tete when the butler brings in a telegram. It reads; 'On root. Everybody enjoyin' theirselves. The Colonel sure some happy, he just shot a coon. Will send the bill to you. THE BOYS.' Bud laughs heartily. The wife joins, and as she nestles up to her big manly husband, says: 'You won't ever want to be a cowboy again, will you, Bud?' Bud turns slowly; looks at the Remington painting which has been the innocent cause of their recent quarrel, and walking over, he turns the picture to the wall, holds out his arms to his wife, and as her head nestles against his shoulder, we plainly catch his words, 'Never Again.'”—23 Oct 1909 Moving Picture World

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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