The Deadwood Coach (1924)

Western | 7 December 1924

Director:

Lynn Reynolds

Writer:

Lynn Reynolds

Cinematographer:

Dan Clark

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

In an article in the Oct 1924 AmCin, cinematographer Dan Clark described filming The Deadwood Coach in southern Utah's Zion Canyon and Bryce Canyon. (Then called "National Monuments," the two canyons are now the Zion National Park and Bryce Canyon National Park.) The production filmed in Zion Canyon for about a week, taking advantage of its picturesque rock formations, then moved on to Bryce Canyon, a more inaccessible location of "gorges, pinnacles and minarets of all descriptions." The terrain required the crew, along with lead actor Tom Mix, "to build stairs and trails down the walls of this canyon in order to enter it to photograph." Clark claimed that upon his arrival, Zion Canyon "had never been touched by the motion picture camera," although this cannot be determined as fact.
       Some exteriors were shot on location in the Dakota Badlands. This film was reissued in 1928. ...

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In an article in the Oct 1924 AmCin, cinematographer Dan Clark described filming The Deadwood Coach in southern Utah's Zion Canyon and Bryce Canyon. (Then called "National Monuments," the two canyons are now the Zion National Park and Bryce Canyon National Park.) The production filmed in Zion Canyon for about a week, taking advantage of its picturesque rock formations, then moved on to Bryce Canyon, a more inaccessible location of "gorges, pinnacles and minarets of all descriptions." The terrain required the crew, along with lead actor Tom Mix, "to build stairs and trails down the walls of this canyon in order to enter it to photograph." Clark claimed that upon his arrival, Zion Canyon "had never been touched by the motion picture camera," although this cannot be determined as fact.
       Some exteriors were shot on location in the Dakota Badlands. This film was reissued in 1928.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Oct 1924
p. 6
Exhibitors Trade Review
21 Jan 1925
p. 49
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Orphan by Clarence E. Mulford (New York, 1908).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 December 1924
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
6 December 1924
LP20874
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,346
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

When he was a boy, growing up in the Bad Lands of Dakota Territory, Jimmie Gordon's parents were killed by Tex Wilson, a brutal bandit. Jimmie swore vengeance, and, known only as The Orphan, he has spent the subsequent years looking for Wilson. At last, hot on the trail of the Wilson gang, The Orphan prevents a holdup of the Deadwood Stage but loses Wilson. He meets one of the passengers on the stage, Helen Shields, the daughter of the local sheriff, and accompanies her to town, only to discover that her father is an old friend whom he once saved from the Indians. As the men talk, Helen learns of The Orphan's tragic past, and the two are soon in love. On their wedding day, the venomous Wilson interrupts the ceremony, insults the unarmed bridegroom, and kidnaps Helen. Wilson makes his escape in the Deadwood Coach, closely followed by The Orphan. When the coach breaks down, Wilson abandons the unharmed girl and tries to escape on foot. The Orphan and Wilson fight it out on the edge of a precipice, and Wilson is thrown to his ...

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When he was a boy, growing up in the Bad Lands of Dakota Territory, Jimmie Gordon's parents were killed by Tex Wilson, a brutal bandit. Jimmie swore vengeance, and, known only as The Orphan, he has spent the subsequent years looking for Wilson. At last, hot on the trail of the Wilson gang, The Orphan prevents a holdup of the Deadwood Stage but loses Wilson. He meets one of the passengers on the stage, Helen Shields, the daughter of the local sheriff, and accompanies her to town, only to discover that her father is an old friend whom he once saved from the Indians. As the men talk, Helen learns of The Orphan's tragic past, and the two are soon in love. On their wedding day, the venomous Wilson interrupts the ceremony, insults the unarmed bridegroom, and kidnaps Helen. Wilson makes his escape in the Deadwood Coach, closely followed by The Orphan. When the coach breaks down, Wilson abandons the unharmed girl and tries to escape on foot. The Orphan and Wilson fight it out on the edge of a precipice, and Wilson is thrown to his death.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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