Corregidor (1943)

73-74 mins | Drama | 29 March 1943

Director:

William Nigh

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Editor:

Charles Henkel

Production Designer:

F. Paul Sylos

Production Company:

Atlantis Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

Although a print of this film was viewed, some credits were taken from a dialogue continuity deposited with copyright records. In those credits set dresser Glenn P. Thompson's name was misspelled as "Glen F." The film opens with the following written dedication: "Dedicated to the heroes of the United States and Philippine Armed Forces, and the American Red Cross." The film closes with a poem about Corregidor written and narrated by English poet Alfred Noyes. According to HR news items, the filmmakers hoped to have Broadway star Alfred Lunt recite Norman Rosten's poem "Corregidor" in the film.
       In a modern interview, Edgar G. Ulmer, who co-wrote the screenplay, stated that he was initially scheduled to direct the film, but was reassigned before production began. HR news items add the following information about the production: Peter R. Van Duinen's new company Atlantis Pictures Corp. was supposed to produce Corregidor as part of a four-picture deal with Producers Releasing Corporation. Neither Van Duinen nor Atlantis are credited onscreen or in the dialogue continuity, however, and no additional information has been found to clarify Van Duinen's association with the film. Later news items reported that Atlantis split from PRC's distribution company in 1943. Paul Kelly was considered for a lead role in the picture. Some scenes were shot on location at Sherwood Lake, CA. The film's release was postponed for almost a month to allow additional work on the ... More Less

Although a print of this film was viewed, some credits were taken from a dialogue continuity deposited with copyright records. In those credits set dresser Glenn P. Thompson's name was misspelled as "Glen F." The film opens with the following written dedication: "Dedicated to the heroes of the United States and Philippine Armed Forces, and the American Red Cross." The film closes with a poem about Corregidor written and narrated by English poet Alfred Noyes. According to HR news items, the filmmakers hoped to have Broadway star Alfred Lunt recite Norman Rosten's poem "Corregidor" in the film.
       In a modern interview, Edgar G. Ulmer, who co-wrote the screenplay, stated that he was initially scheduled to direct the film, but was reassigned before production began. HR news items add the following information about the production: Peter R. Van Duinen's new company Atlantis Pictures Corp. was supposed to produce Corregidor as part of a four-picture deal with Producers Releasing Corporation. Neither Van Duinen nor Atlantis are credited onscreen or in the dialogue continuity, however, and no additional information has been found to clarify Van Duinen's association with the film. Later news items reported that Atlantis split from PRC's distribution company in 1943. Paul Kelly was considered for a lead role in the picture. Some scenes were shot on location at Sherwood Lake, CA. The film's release was postponed for almost a month to allow additional work on the picture. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Mar 1943.
---
Daily Variety
23 Mar 43
pp. 3-4.
Film Daily
25 Mar 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 42
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 42
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Mar 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 43
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Mar 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Jan 43
p. 1104.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Mar 43
p. 1226.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Jun 43
p. 1392.
New York Times
28 May 43
p. 19.
Variety
2 Jun 43
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Leon Fromkess in Charge of Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
WRITERS
Orig story and scr
Orig story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Epilogue wrt and dir by
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 March 1943
Production Date:
4 December--mid December 1942 at Fine Arts Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Producers Releasing Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 March 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12010
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73-74
Length(in feet):
6,598
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9075
SYNOPSIS

On 6 Dec 1941, surgeon Royce Lee and her maid, Hyacinth, arrive at a thatched hut on Manoi Island in the Philippines, which is the home of Royce's fiancé, Dr. Jan Stockman. The next day Royce and Jan are married by a local priest, but a Japanese squadron flies overhead as the ceremony ends and bombs the island. Hyacinth is killed, but Jan and Royce are unharmed, and they join up with a small unit of American soldiers. While continually avoiding Japanese ground forces, the troop heads toward Manila, which is 600 miles away. After Jan is shot in a scuffle with Japanese soldiers, Royce is able to treat the wound, but when their lieutenant falls ill with malaria, he commits suicide so that he will not detain the unit and thereby place them in danger of capture. Several days later, the group reaches the rocky island of Corregidor, where American forces have stationed themselves in an underground cavern. One of the soldiers, Pinky, reunites with his girl friend, whom he affectionately calls "Hey Dutch." Royce and Dan are immediately put to work in the army hospital, and Royce finds that her former lover, Michael, who had previously left her without explanation, is also there. Although Jan believes that Royce still loves Michael, Michael insists that he left her because she tried to buy his affection when he was a struggling intern. Japanese planes mercilessly bomb the island, and the men and women stationed there have little respite from the barrage. The news of the Japanese invasion of Burma soon reaches Corregidor, and after taking stock of their diminishing supplies, the commanding officers nevertheless choose ... +


On 6 Dec 1941, surgeon Royce Lee and her maid, Hyacinth, arrive at a thatched hut on Manoi Island in the Philippines, which is the home of Royce's fiancé, Dr. Jan Stockman. The next day Royce and Jan are married by a local priest, but a Japanese squadron flies overhead as the ceremony ends and bombs the island. Hyacinth is killed, but Jan and Royce are unharmed, and they join up with a small unit of American soldiers. While continually avoiding Japanese ground forces, the troop heads toward Manila, which is 600 miles away. After Jan is shot in a scuffle with Japanese soldiers, Royce is able to treat the wound, but when their lieutenant falls ill with malaria, he commits suicide so that he will not detain the unit and thereby place them in danger of capture. Several days later, the group reaches the rocky island of Corregidor, where American forces have stationed themselves in an underground cavern. One of the soldiers, Pinky, reunites with his girl friend, whom he affectionately calls "Hey Dutch." Royce and Dan are immediately put to work in the army hospital, and Royce finds that her former lover, Michael, who had previously left her without explanation, is also there. Although Jan believes that Royce still loves Michael, Michael insists that he left her because she tried to buy his affection when he was a struggling intern. Japanese planes mercilessly bomb the island, and the men and women stationed there have little respite from the barrage. The news of the Japanese invasion of Burma soon reaches Corregidor, and after taking stock of their diminishing supplies, the commanding officers nevertheless choose to continue to defend the outpost. Dutch is injured while working as a stretcher bearer during an attack, and she and Pinky are married as she lies in her hospital bed. Dutch dies soon after, and Royce once again reassures Jan of her love, but he is resigned to the fact that she still loves Michael. When ammunition runs out, Pinky and the soldiers engage in hand-to-hand combat with the Japanese. Jan continues to work outdoors in triage even after he is shot during an attack, but he is soon killed when a bomb drops on the makeshift hospital. Below ground, Royce delivers a Filipino baby and then receives news from Michael of her husband's death. Royce and the nurses are ordered to evacuate immediately, and she reluctantly boards the plane, vowing to reunite with Michael after the war. Pinky is the tailgunner in the plane, and dies valiantly defending the lives of the nurses. At Corregidor, the lack of supplies forces Michael to operate on the wounded without painkillers or gloves, and the radio operator files his last report, fifty-five minutes before the outpost surrenders. At home in the United States, Royce sheds tears for her lost friends. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.