The Docks of New York (1928)

60 mins | Drama | 29 September 1928

Full page view
HISTORY

The 5 May 1928 Motion Picture News announced the forthcoming The Docks of New York, to be directed by Josef von Sternberg, and star lead actor George Bancroft.
       The 3 Jun 1928 FD reported that von Sternberg and writer Jules Furthman had just returned to Hollywood from the East Coast, where they conducted research for the Paramount Famous Lasky Corp. picture.
       A directory chart in the 11 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World noted that production began 25 Jun 1928. Principal photography began on 10 Jul 1928 at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to that day’s Exhibitors Daily Review.
       The 2 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review announced that actor George Irving would be playing a judge in the picture, but he was not included in review cast listings.
       An item in the 20 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review noted that the picture was currently being edited.
       The 19 Sep 1928 Var review deemed The Docks of New York “a corking program picture,” praising George Bancroft’s performance, Julian Johnson’s titles, von Sternberg’s direction, and the “exquisite ... More Less

The 5 May 1928 Motion Picture News announced the forthcoming The Docks of New York, to be directed by Josef von Sternberg, and star lead actor George Bancroft.
       The 3 Jun 1928 FD reported that von Sternberg and writer Jules Furthman had just returned to Hollywood from the East Coast, where they conducted research for the Paramount Famous Lasky Corp. picture.
       A directory chart in the 11 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World noted that production began 25 Jun 1928. Principal photography began on 10 Jul 1928 at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to that day’s Exhibitors Daily Review.
       The 2 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review announced that actor George Irving would be playing a judge in the picture, but he was not included in review cast listings.
       An item in the 20 Aug 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review noted that the picture was currently being edited.
       The 19 Sep 1928 Var review deemed The Docks of New York “a corking program picture,” praising George Bancroft’s performance, Julian Johnson’s titles, von Sternberg’s direction, and the “exquisite photography.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Daily Review
10 Jul 1928
p. 4.
Exhibitors Daily Review
2 Aug 1928
p. 4.
Exhibitors Daily Review
20 Aug 1928
p. 4.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
11 Aug 1928
p. 77..
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
27 Oct 1928
p. 52.
Film Daily
3 Jun 1928
p. 11.
Film Daily
23 Sep 1928
p. 6.
Motion Picture News
5 May 1928
p. 1485.
New York Times
17 Sep 1928
p. 28.
New York Times
20 Sep 1930
Sec 8, p. 6.
The Film Mercury
26 Oct 1928
p. 6.
The Film Spectator
29 Sep 1928
pp. 13-14.
Variety
19 Sep 1928
p. 12.
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 September 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 16 September 1928
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
29 September 1928
Copyright Number:
LP2566
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in feet):
7,202
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Bill Roberts, a stoker on a tramp steamer, comes ashore for eight hours' leave and saves the life of Sadie, a bitter waterfront tramp who, tired of her sordid life in sailors' dancehalls, throws herself into the water. That evening Bill gets drunk and marries Sadie in a ceremony presided over by Hymn Book Harry, a mission worker; the following morning Bill leaves her without a word and returns to his ship. The third engineer tries to make love to Sadie and is killed by his wife, Lou; Sadie is blamed for the crime, but Lou comes forward and confesses. As the steamer is leaving New York harbor, Bill realizes that he loves Sadie and jumps ship, swimming to shore. Sadie has been taken into court for stealing the clothes Bill had given her to be married in, and he confesses to the theft, promising to return to Sadie after his 60 days in ... +


Bill Roberts, a stoker on a tramp steamer, comes ashore for eight hours' leave and saves the life of Sadie, a bitter waterfront tramp who, tired of her sordid life in sailors' dancehalls, throws herself into the water. That evening Bill gets drunk and marries Sadie in a ceremony presided over by Hymn Book Harry, a mission worker; the following morning Bill leaves her without a word and returns to his ship. The third engineer tries to make love to Sadie and is killed by his wife, Lou; Sadie is blamed for the crime, but Lou comes forward and confesses. As the steamer is leaving New York harbor, Bill realizes that he loves Sadie and jumps ship, swimming to shore. Sadie has been taken into court for stealing the clothes Bill had given her to be married in, and he confesses to the theft, promising to return to Sadie after his 60 days in jail. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.