Forsaking All Others (1934)

84 mins | Romantic comedy | 23 December 1934

Director:

W. S. Van Dyke

Producer:

Bernard H. Hyman

Cinematographers:

George Folsey, Gregg Toland

Editor:

Tom Held

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to HR news items from the Spring of 1934, Miriam Hopkins was initially wanted on loanout from Paramount for the film. Loretta Young was then announced as the star of the film, that was to be produced by Frank Davis and directed by Irving Rapper as his first directing assignment. Portions of the film were shot on location in Lake Arrowhead, CA. Davis is listed as the assistant to producer Bernard H. Hyman in other sources, and Rapper, who worked as a dialogue director at Warner Bros. during the 1930s, did not make his solo directing debut until 1941, when he made Shinging Victory for Warner Bros.
       According to a HR production chart, Louise Henry, Lillian Harmer, Hooper Atchley, Forrester Harvey, Margaret Bert, Edward Brophy, Pat Flaherty and Ted Healy were also in the cast. Neither Brophy, Flaherty or Healy were in the viewed print and it is possible that their roles were cut before the film's release. The appearance of the other actors cannot be confirmed. According to contemporary news items and information contained in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the film ran into trouble with the Hays Office beginning in late Sep 1934 when the completed script was submitted. At that time some of the dialogue was deemed unacceptable by the office. Words such as "tramp," "sex appeal" and "nudist wedding" were called objectionable. In a 27 Nov memo made after a screening of the completed film, Joseph I. Breen of the Hays Office wrote that he was "very gravely concerned about it..." The most ... More Less

According to HR news items from the Spring of 1934, Miriam Hopkins was initially wanted on loanout from Paramount for the film. Loretta Young was then announced as the star of the film, that was to be produced by Frank Davis and directed by Irving Rapper as his first directing assignment. Portions of the film were shot on location in Lake Arrowhead, CA. Davis is listed as the assistant to producer Bernard H. Hyman in other sources, and Rapper, who worked as a dialogue director at Warner Bros. during the 1930s, did not make his solo directing debut until 1941, when he made Shinging Victory for Warner Bros.
       According to a HR production chart, Louise Henry, Lillian Harmer, Hooper Atchley, Forrester Harvey, Margaret Bert, Edward Brophy, Pat Flaherty and Ted Healy were also in the cast. Neither Brophy, Flaherty or Healy were in the viewed print and it is possible that their roles were cut before the film's release. The appearance of the other actors cannot be confirmed. According to contemporary news items and information contained in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the film ran into trouble with the Hays Office beginning in late Sep 1934 when the completed script was submitted. At that time some of the dialogue was deemed unacceptable by the office. Words such as "tramp," "sex appeal" and "nudist wedding" were called objectionable. In a 27 Nov memo made after a screening of the completed film, Joseph I. Breen of the Hays Office wrote that he was "very gravely concerned about it..." The most problematic scenes, according to information in the file, concerned the sequence during which the characters of "Dill" and "Mary" are alone in her aunt's cottage. According to a DV news item on 3 Dec, Breen and his "band of seven" had had a conference with M-G-M executives that ended with Breen saying he was washing his hands of the matter and telling M-G-M to either do the retakes, appeal to the Hays boards or shelve the picture.
       The film was approved on 11 Dec 1934, but only after several eliminations in dialogue and situations were made. The scenes reshot toned down the dialogue and made the cottage evening appear more "innocent" than originally intended. Some aspects of the film that Breen found objectionable were retained in the film, however, such as shots of Clark Gable in his underwear and of a woman giving Crawford a massage. Reviews of the film noted that some underwear and shower scenes still in the film were "risque" by then current standards. Reviews also commented on the effectiveness of the comic scene in which Crawford and Robert Montgomery, both wearing white suits, are thrown off a bicycle into a pigsty. Although most reviewers praised the gowns designed by Adrian for the film, the HR reviewer thought the clothes in "bad taste" and "distracting." Tallulah Bankhead portrayed Mary Clay in the Broadway production of the play, and Bette Davis took over the role on a 28 Feb 1938 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Dec 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
4 Dec 34
p. 1.
Daily Variety
12 Dec 34
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Nov 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Dec 34
p. 8.
Film Daily
23 Jun 33
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 34
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 34
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 34
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
22 May 34
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 34
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
8 Dec 34
p. 46.
New York Times
21 Dec 34
p. 18.
Variety
1 Jan 35
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A W. S. Van Dyke Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Forsaking All Others by Frank Cavett and Edward Barry Roberts (New York, 1 Mar 1933).
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 December 1934
Production Date:
late September--22 October 1934
retakes 15 November--16 November 1934 and early December 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
17 December 1934
Copyright Number:
LP 5247
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
487
SYNOPSIS

Mary Clay feels as if she is the happiest woman alive because she is about to wed Dillon Todd, a man whom she has loved since childhood. That same day, Jeff Williams, another childhood companion, returns from a long business trip to Spain, and is equally ecstatic that he can finally propose to Mary, whom he has always loved. When Jeff discovers that Mary is about to wed Dill, he keeps his feelings a secret and agrees to give the bride away. He also secretly orders dozens of cornflowers for Mary, knowing that they are her favorite flowers. The night before the wedding, however, Dill runs off and marries Connie Barnes, a woman with whom he had had an affair in Europe some months before. Mary then goes to the country with her aunt Paula to get over Dill and when Jeff and their friend Shep visit, she claims to be completely cured. She jumps at the chance to go to a party to which Connie has invited her, however, and soon Dill, who knows his mistake, begs to see Mary again. Jeff warns Mary not to get involved with a married man, and even spanks her with a hairbrush to emphasize the point, but she agrees to see Dill. One day, while riding in the country, their car breaks down, a rainstorm starts, and they take refuge in Paula's country home. Dill calls his valet to bring another car, but tells him to wait until the morning to bring it. Despite the circumstances, the evening is spent innocently, but the next day Paula convinces Jeff and Shep to get Mary away to ... +


Mary Clay feels as if she is the happiest woman alive because she is about to wed Dillon Todd, a man whom she has loved since childhood. That same day, Jeff Williams, another childhood companion, returns from a long business trip to Spain, and is equally ecstatic that he can finally propose to Mary, whom he has always loved. When Jeff discovers that Mary is about to wed Dill, he keeps his feelings a secret and agrees to give the bride away. He also secretly orders dozens of cornflowers for Mary, knowing that they are her favorite flowers. The night before the wedding, however, Dill runs off and marries Connie Barnes, a woman with whom he had had an affair in Europe some months before. Mary then goes to the country with her aunt Paula to get over Dill and when Jeff and their friend Shep visit, she claims to be completely cured. She jumps at the chance to go to a party to which Connie has invited her, however, and soon Dill, who knows his mistake, begs to see Mary again. Jeff warns Mary not to get involved with a married man, and even spanks her with a hairbrush to emphasize the point, but she agrees to see Dill. One day, while riding in the country, their car breaks down, a rainstorm starts, and they take refuge in Paula's country home. Dill calls his valet to bring another car, but tells him to wait until the morning to bring it. Despite the circumstances, the evening is spent innocently, but the next day Paula convinces Jeff and Shep to get Mary away to avoid a scandal. Connie, meanwhile, has been told everything by Dill's valet and races to Paula's. Jeff arrives first and, realizing that nothing has happened, tries to cover for Mary, but Connie still demands a divorce. Some time later, it is again Mary and Dill's wedding, but this time it is Dill who is left at the altar when Jeff tells her that he has always loved her, just as he is about to sail for Spain. When she learns from Shep that it was Jeff, not Dill who sent her the cornflowers, she realizes that she loves Jeff. When he finds Mary on the boat, Jeff tells the steward to quickly bring the captain to perform a wedding. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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