Dangerous Corner (1934)

65-67 mins | Mystery, Melodrama | 5 October 1934

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HISTORY

A pre-release DV review gives the running time as 83 minutes, suggesting that the film was cut significantly before its general release. RKO borrowed Virginia Bruce from M-G-M for this production. According to modern sources, studio publicity writers found advertising the film difficult because they were unable to emphasize the unusual double ending without compromising the surprise element at the same time. In the scene between "Ann" and "Martin," Martin drinks what appears to be a drug-laced cocktail, but the film makes no specific reference to the illicit ... More Less

A pre-release DV review gives the running time as 83 minutes, suggesting that the film was cut significantly before its general release. RKO borrowed Virginia Bruce from M-G-M for this production. According to modern sources, studio publicity writers found advertising the film difficult because they were unable to emphasize the unusual double ending without compromising the surprise element at the same time. In the scene between "Ann" and "Martin," Martin drinks what appears to be a drug-laced cocktail, but the film makes no specific reference to the illicit substance. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Aug 34
p. 6.
Daily Variety
13 Sep 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
4 Dec 34
p. 8.
HF
4 Aug 34
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 34
p. 11.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Sep 34
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
18 Aug 34
pp. 49-50.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Jan 35
pp. 62-63.
Variety
5 Feb 35
p. 31.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Assoc dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr to dial
Contr to dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Dangerous Corner by J. B. Priestley (London, 17 May 1932).
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 October 1934
Production Date:
began 1 August 1934
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 October 1934
Copyright Number:
LP5028
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65-67
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
237
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When publisher Robert Chatfield discovers on his wedding anniversary that a valuable bond is missing from the company safe, suspicion is cast among the four partners: Robert, his brother Martin, his brother-in-law Gordon and Charles Stanton. That weekend, Charles calls on Martin and finds him dead from a bullet wound. After an exhaustive inquest, a jury declares Martin's death a suicide, and Robert and the others assume that guilt over the bond theft was the motive. Many months later, however, during an after-dinner discussion at Robert's country home, Robert begins to question his wife Freda and Ann, an assistant at the company, about the last time they saw Martin alive. Surprisingly, their answers differ significantly from their inquest statements, and curious to know what the women are hiding, Robert pursues his inquiries with vigor. Finally, Freda confesses that she had been in love with Martin, and Ann admits to her long-standing, unspoken adoration of Robert and her fear that he, not Martin, had stolen the bond. Although Robert is sympathetic to his wife's unfulfilled love, he denies the theft and demands that Charles, who had encouraged the rumor, explain himself. Charles casually admits to stealing the bond, which causes Robert to imply that Charles indirectly drove Martin to suicide because he believed that Robert was guilty. At this point, Ann confesses to having accidentally shot Martin herself, recounting a story of Martin's strange, drug-induced taunting and game-playing with a gun. Charles, who has loved Ann for years, then confesses that he knew all along about her participation in the crime, and Betty, Gordon's wife, states that not only is she miserable in ... +


When publisher Robert Chatfield discovers on his wedding anniversary that a valuable bond is missing from the company safe, suspicion is cast among the four partners: Robert, his brother Martin, his brother-in-law Gordon and Charles Stanton. That weekend, Charles calls on Martin and finds him dead from a bullet wound. After an exhaustive inquest, a jury declares Martin's death a suicide, and Robert and the others assume that guilt over the bond theft was the motive. Many months later, however, during an after-dinner discussion at Robert's country home, Robert begins to question his wife Freda and Ann, an assistant at the company, about the last time they saw Martin alive. Surprisingly, their answers differ significantly from their inquest statements, and curious to know what the women are hiding, Robert pursues his inquiries with vigor. Finally, Freda confesses that she had been in love with Martin, and Ann admits to her long-standing, unspoken adoration of Robert and her fear that he, not Martin, had stolen the bond. Although Robert is sympathetic to his wife's unfulfilled love, he denies the theft and demands that Charles, who had encouraged the rumor, explain himself. Charles casually admits to stealing the bond, which causes Robert to imply that Charles indirectly drove Martin to suicide because he believed that Robert was guilty. At this point, Ann confesses to having accidentally shot Martin herself, recounting a story of Martin's strange, drug-induced taunting and game-playing with a gun. Charles, who has loved Ann for years, then confesses that he knew all along about her participation in the crime, and Betty, Gordon's wife, states that not only is she miserable in her seemingly blissful marriage, but is suffering from an unrequited love for Charles, who reveals that he stole the bond to help her pay back a gambling debt. His romantic delusions about Betty shattered, Robert leaves the room and shoots himself. [Thus the first version of the story ends. In a second ending, which begins immediately after the first, the after-dinner conversation starts again, but this time, Charles proposes and is accepted by Ann, and Robert asks no questions, thus steering clear of the "dangerous corner."] +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.