Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935)

95 mins | Musical comedy | 16 March 1935

Director:

Busby Berkeley

Cinematographer:

George Barnes

Editor:

George Amy

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

First National Productions Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

A news item in DV notes that Jack Grieves, a twenty-six year old dancer in the chorus, died on the set from acute indigestion. A news item in HR notes that Rosita, formerly of the dance team Ramon and Rosita, applied for an injunction against Warner Bros. because although she did not appear in the film, she was billed as dancing with Ramon. According to modern sources, fifty-six pianos were used in "The Words Are in My Heart" number. To create their movement, stagehands dressed in black were under each piano. "Lullaby of Broadway" won the Academy Award for Best Song of the year. For more information on Warner Bros.' "Gold Diggers" films see the entry below for Gold Diggers of 1933 ... More Less

A news item in DV notes that Jack Grieves, a twenty-six year old dancer in the chorus, died on the set from acute indigestion. A news item in HR notes that Rosita, formerly of the dance team Ramon and Rosita, applied for an injunction against Warner Bros. because although she did not appear in the film, she was billed as dancing with Ramon. According to modern sources, fifty-six pianos were used in "The Words Are in My Heart" number. To create their movement, stagehands dressed in black were under each piano. "Lullaby of Broadway" won the Academy Award for Best Song of the year. For more information on Warner Bros.' "Gold Diggers" films see the entry below for Gold Diggers of 1933 . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Nov 34
p. 4.
Daily Variety
11 Jan 35
p. 5.
Daily Variety
12 Jan 35
p. 4.
Daily Variety
15 Jan 35
p. 1.
Daily Variety
18 Mar 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Mar 35
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 35
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
4 Mar 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
23 Mar 35
p. 39.
New York Times
15 Mar 35
p. 25.
Variety
20 Mar 35
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
DANCE
Dances created and staged
SOURCES
SONGS
"Lullaby of Broadway," "The Words Are in My Heart" and "I'm Going Shopping with You," music and lyrics by Harry Warren and Al Dubin.
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 March 1935
Production Date:
completed 14 January 1935
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 February 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5348
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
95
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
580
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The wealthy Mrs. Mathilda Prentiss, her sullen daughter Ann, and playboy son Humbolt are vacationing at a luxurious summer resort, where they are joined by Ann's fiancé, T. Mosley Thorpe, an eccentric, middle-aged millionaire who is writing a monograph on snuffboxes. Ann is getting no attention from Mosley and convinces her mother to hire Dick Curtis, the hotel's handsome and youthful desk clerk, to escort her for the summer. Dick hesitates, but his fiancée, Arlene Davis, encourages him to accept the job. With Dick's help, Ann buys a new wardrobe and jewels and gets a new coiffure, transforming herself into a lovely young woman. Meanwhile, Humbolt has discovered Arlene's charms, and Mrs. Prentiss has hired an impresario named Nicoleff to direct her annual charity show. The parsimonious Mrs. Prentiss wants to cut corners on the production, but Nicoleff, along with Schultz, his set decorator, Louis Lamson, the hotel manager, and Betty Hawes, the hotel stenographer, are plotting to make a big profit at the wealthy woman's expense. Betty, who has been taking dictation for Mosley, is also scheming to blackmail the befuddled writer, by suggesting he use her name in the lyrics for a love song. When she addresses a copy to herself, it reads like a proposal. By the time the show goes on, Ann and Dick are in love, Arlene has married Humbolt and Mrs. Prentiss discovers Mosley's entanglement with Betty, who is suing him for breach of promise. The lavish musical is a hit, but has cost Mrs. Prentiss a small fortune. Finally, Ann defies her mother and marries ... +


The wealthy Mrs. Mathilda Prentiss, her sullen daughter Ann, and playboy son Humbolt are vacationing at a luxurious summer resort, where they are joined by Ann's fiancé, T. Mosley Thorpe, an eccentric, middle-aged millionaire who is writing a monograph on snuffboxes. Ann is getting no attention from Mosley and convinces her mother to hire Dick Curtis, the hotel's handsome and youthful desk clerk, to escort her for the summer. Dick hesitates, but his fiancée, Arlene Davis, encourages him to accept the job. With Dick's help, Ann buys a new wardrobe and jewels and gets a new coiffure, transforming herself into a lovely young woman. Meanwhile, Humbolt has discovered Arlene's charms, and Mrs. Prentiss has hired an impresario named Nicoleff to direct her annual charity show. The parsimonious Mrs. Prentiss wants to cut corners on the production, but Nicoleff, along with Schultz, his set decorator, Louis Lamson, the hotel manager, and Betty Hawes, the hotel stenographer, are plotting to make a big profit at the wealthy woman's expense. Betty, who has been taking dictation for Mosley, is also scheming to blackmail the befuddled writer, by suggesting he use her name in the lyrics for a love song. When she addresses a copy to herself, it reads like a proposal. By the time the show goes on, Ann and Dick are in love, Arlene has married Humbolt and Mrs. Prentiss discovers Mosley's entanglement with Betty, who is suing him for breach of promise. The lavish musical is a hit, but has cost Mrs. Prentiss a small fortune. Finally, Ann defies her mother and marries Dick. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.