G-Men (1935)

85 mins | Drama | 4 May 1935

Director:

William Keighley

Writer:

Seton I. Miller

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Jack Killifer

Production Designer:

John Hughes

Production Company:

First National Productions Corp.
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HISTORY

The film's working title was The Farrell Case . Gregory Rogers, listed as the author of the novel, was a pseudonym of Darryl F. Zanuck, formerly the head of production at Warner Bros. When the film was re-issued on 1949 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the F.B.I., Warner Bros. added a prologue which featured David Brian. According to modern sources, J. Edgar Hoover gave the film a Dept. of Justice seal of approval and was consulted on the casting of the leading men. Modern sources note that the film was banned in Chicago because of its violence. Although he did not receive an onscreen credit as story writer, Zanuck was a write-in candidate for an Academy Award in the Writing (Original Story) ... More Less

The film's working title was The Farrell Case . Gregory Rogers, listed as the author of the novel, was a pseudonym of Darryl F. Zanuck, formerly the head of production at Warner Bros. When the film was re-issued on 1949 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the F.B.I., Warner Bros. added a prologue which featured David Brian. According to modern sources, J. Edgar Hoover gave the film a Dept. of Justice seal of approval and was consulted on the casting of the leading men. Modern sources note that the film was banned in Chicago because of its violence. Although he did not receive an onscreen credit as story writer, Zanuck was a write-in candidate for an Academy Award in the Writing (Original Story) category. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Feb 35
p. 2.
Daily Variety
17 Apr 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Apr 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 35
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
17 Apr 35
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Apr 35
p. 69.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Apr 35
p. 48.
New York Times
2 May 35
p. 17.
Variety
8 May 35
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Public Enemy No. 1 by Gregory Rogers (publication undetermined).
SONGS
"You Bother Me an Awful Lot," music and lyrics by Sammy Fain and Irving Kahal.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Farrell Case
Release Date:
4 May 1935
Production Date:
20 February--1 April 1935
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 May 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5548
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
745
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

James "Brick" Davis, a struggling attorney, owes his education to a mob member named McKay, but refuses to get involved with the underworld. When his friend Eddie Buchanan is gunned down by gangster Brad Collins while on assignment for the Justice Department, Brick decides to give up the law for a career with the Department. He says goodbye to his benefactor and to his girlfriend, Jean Morgan, a singer in McKay's nightclub, and heads for training in Washington, where he immediately takes a dislike to his boss, Jeff McCord. He flirts, unsuccessfully, with Jeff's sister Kay, but earns the respect of another seasoned department man, Hugh Farrell. Despite Brick's natural aptitudes and his inside knowledge of mob activities, Jeff refuses to put him on a case even when he positively identifies Danny Leggett as one of the criminals. Jeff gives Farrell the assignment, and he's killed in the line of duty. Jeff and Brick take over the case, tracing the gang to McKay's Wisconsin lodge, with the help of Jean, who is now married to mob member Brad Collins. In a violent exchange, McKay and most of the mob are killed. Collins is still at large and wounds Brick when he attempts to warn Jean. While Brick is hospitalized, Collins kidnaps Kay and shoots Jean when he discovers she has betrayed the gang. Brick reaches her before she dies, and she discloses Collins' plan to use Kay to get through the police barriers. Brick wounds Collins fatally, and rescues Kay, who now agrees to marry ... +


James "Brick" Davis, a struggling attorney, owes his education to a mob member named McKay, but refuses to get involved with the underworld. When his friend Eddie Buchanan is gunned down by gangster Brad Collins while on assignment for the Justice Department, Brick decides to give up the law for a career with the Department. He says goodbye to his benefactor and to his girlfriend, Jean Morgan, a singer in McKay's nightclub, and heads for training in Washington, where he immediately takes a dislike to his boss, Jeff McCord. He flirts, unsuccessfully, with Jeff's sister Kay, but earns the respect of another seasoned department man, Hugh Farrell. Despite Brick's natural aptitudes and his inside knowledge of mob activities, Jeff refuses to put him on a case even when he positively identifies Danny Leggett as one of the criminals. Jeff gives Farrell the assignment, and he's killed in the line of duty. Jeff and Brick take over the case, tracing the gang to McKay's Wisconsin lodge, with the help of Jean, who is now married to mob member Brad Collins. In a violent exchange, McKay and most of the mob are killed. Collins is still at large and wounds Brick when he attempts to warn Jean. While Brick is hospitalized, Collins kidnaps Kay and shoots Jean when he discovers she has betrayed the gang. Brick reaches her before she dies, and she discloses Collins' plan to use Kay to get through the police barriers. Brick wounds Collins fatally, and rescues Kay, who now agrees to marry him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.