Female (1933)

60 or 65 mins | Comedy-drama | 11 November 1933

Director:

Michael Curtiz

Cinematographer:

Sid Hickox

Editor:

Jack Killifer

Production Designer:

Jack Okey

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to FD, Johnny Mack Brown replaced Lyle Talbot. William Dieterle was originally assigned to direct but according to a news item in 8 Aug 1933 FD, William Wellman replaced him when Dieterle became seriously ill. Michael Curtiz took over directorial duties when Wellman had to begin College Coach. IP indicates that Henry Blanke was originally the producer. Warner Bros. production records in the file on the film at the AMPAS library state that the film was made for a total cost of $260,000. According to modern sources, shots of the heroine's house were filmed at the Ennis House in the Hollywood Hills, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Modern sources list these additional players: Larry Steers, Wallis Clark, Dick Winslow, Bob McKenzie and Ethel Wales. ...

More Less

According to FD, Johnny Mack Brown replaced Lyle Talbot. William Dieterle was originally assigned to direct but according to a news item in 8 Aug 1933 FD, William Wellman replaced him when Dieterle became seriously ill. Michael Curtiz took over directorial duties when Wellman had to begin College Coach. IP indicates that Henry Blanke was originally the producer. Warner Bros. production records in the file on the film at the AMPAS library state that the film was made for a total cost of $260,000. According to modern sources, shots of the heroine's house were filmed at the Ennis House in the Hollywood Hills, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Modern sources list these additional players: Larry Steers, Wallis Clark, Dick Winslow, Bob McKenzie and Ethel Wales.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 Oct 1933
p. 3
Daily Variety
11 Oct 1933
p. 3
Film Daily
8 Aug 1933
p. 10
Film Daily
11 Sep 1933
p. 7
Film Daily
4 Nov 1933
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1933
p. 3
International Photographer
1 Aug 1933
p. 35
Motion Picture Herald
21 Oct 1933
p. 39
New York Times
14 Nov 1933
p. 18
Variety
7 Nov 1933
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
William Wellman
Fill-In dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
Robert Presnell
Prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
2d cam
Bobby Robinson
Asst cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOUND
Charles Lang
Sd
Rec eng
PRODUCTION MISC
Chief elec
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the novel Female by Donald Henderson Clarke (New York, 1932).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 November 1933
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
22 November 1933
LP4261
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60 or 65
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Alison Drake, president of a large automobile company she took over after her father's death, is cynical about love. She casually seduces the attractive men in her company, but the brief, meaningless affairs only add to her boredom and confirm her belief that men, like women, can be bought with money and power. One night, in search of excitement, Alison goes to a shooting gallery and meets an attractive young man, who surprises her by declining her sexual advances. The next day, she meets the young man at the company and discovers that he is Jim Thorne, the prominent automobile designer she has just hired, sight unseen. She coolly discusses business with him, then, following her usual pattern, invites him to her home for dinner that night. Expecting another conquest after plying him with vodka, Alison is surprised when Jim rebuffs her again and insists that their relationship remain strictly business. Determined to break him, Alison successfully tricks Jim into meeting her alone on what he was told would be a company picnic in the country. Finally charmed when Alison behaves in a more down-to-earth manner, Jim succumbs to her. When he asks her to marry him, though, it is she who turns him down. Furious, Jim quits the company and leaves town. Finally realizing that she cares more for Jim than her company, Alison follows him, determined that even a financial meeting in New York that is critical to the survival of her company is not worthwhile. When she finally catches up with Jim at a carnival shooting gallery, she tearfully admits that she was willing to risk bankruptcy ...

More Less

Alison Drake, president of a large automobile company she took over after her father's death, is cynical about love. She casually seduces the attractive men in her company, but the brief, meaningless affairs only add to her boredom and confirm her belief that men, like women, can be bought with money and power. One night, in search of excitement, Alison goes to a shooting gallery and meets an attractive young man, who surprises her by declining her sexual advances. The next day, she meets the young man at the company and discovers that he is Jim Thorne, the prominent automobile designer she has just hired, sight unseen. She coolly discusses business with him, then, following her usual pattern, invites him to her home for dinner that night. Expecting another conquest after plying him with vodka, Alison is surprised when Jim rebuffs her again and insists that their relationship remain strictly business. Determined to break him, Alison successfully tricks Jim into meeting her alone on what he was told would be a company picnic in the country. Finally charmed when Alison behaves in a more down-to-earth manner, Jim succumbs to her. When he asks her to marry him, though, it is she who turns him down. Furious, Jim quits the company and leaves town. Finally realizing that she cares more for Jim than her company, Alison follows him, determined that even a financial meeting in New York that is critical to the survival of her company is not worthwhile. When she finally catches up with Jim at a carnival shooting gallery, she tearfully admits that she was willing to risk bankruptcy to find him. He accepts her love, then, affirming that no one will take her company away from her, he takes the wheel of her car and races toward New York so that she will be there on time for the meeting. As they are driving, she happily reveals that, after they marry, she plans to let him run the company while she stays at home to take care of their children.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Star Wars

The film’s title card is preceded by the statement: “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away....” Afterward, a prologue reads: “It is a period of ... >>

They Won't Believe Me

Although a HR news item claims that Gordon McDonell's story was published in Cosmopolitan , SAB and other sources refer to the story as unpublished. ... >>

Aces Wild

In the onscreen credits, sound man Corson Jowett's surname was misspelled "Jewett." This film was also reviewed as Aces High . Although publicity items claim that ... >>

Her Man

The 23 Mar 1930 FD reported that writer Thomas Buckingham was currently working on an original story to be directed by Tay Garnett for Pathé Exchange, Inc. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.