The Awful Truth (1937)

89-90 mins | Screwball comedy | 21 October 1937

Director:

Leo McCarey

Writer:

Viña Delmar

Cinematographer:

Joseph Walker

Editor:

Al Clark

Production Designers:

Stephen Goosson, Lionel Banks
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HISTORY

"Mr. Smith," the dog, is played by "Skippy," who also starred as Asta in M-G-M's The Thin Man series. Leo McCarey won an Academy Award for direction and the film also received Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Actress (Dunne), Supporting Actor (Bellamy), and Screenplay. FD named the film one of 1937's best. MPH credits Marguerite Churchill with the role of "Barbara Vance," but Molly Lamont is listed onscreen. According to modern sources, much of the film was improvised by McCarey and the actors. Modern sources list Alan Bridge as a "Motor cop." Arthur Richman's play was also the basis for a silent film in 1925, directed by Paul Powell and starring Agnes Ayers and Warner Baxter. It was filmed again in 1929 as a talkie, directed by Marshall Neilan and starring Ina Claire, who also headed the Broadway cast (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1929-30; F2.2010 and F2.2011). In 1953 it was remade by Columbia under the title Let's Do It Again, directed by Alexander Hall and starring Jane Wyman and Ray Milland. ...

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"Mr. Smith," the dog, is played by "Skippy," who also starred as Asta in M-G-M's The Thin Man series. Leo McCarey won an Academy Award for direction and the film also received Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Actress (Dunne), Supporting Actor (Bellamy), and Screenplay. FD named the film one of 1937's best. MPH credits Marguerite Churchill with the role of "Barbara Vance," but Molly Lamont is listed onscreen. According to modern sources, much of the film was improvised by McCarey and the actors. Modern sources list Alan Bridge as a "Motor cop." Arthur Richman's play was also the basis for a silent film in 1925, directed by Paul Powell and starring Agnes Ayers and Warner Baxter. It was filmed again in 1929 as a talkie, directed by Marshall Neilan and starring Ina Claire, who also headed the Broadway cast (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1929-30; F2.2010 and F2.2011). In 1953 it was remade by Columbia under the title Let's Do It Again, directed by Alexander Hall and starring Jane Wyman and Ray Milland.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
General (mod):
Personal note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 Oct 1937
p. 3
Film Daily
11 Oct 1937
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 1937
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
7 Oct 1937
p.2
Motion Picture Herald
17 Jul 1937
p. 67
Motion Picture Herald
9 Oct 1937
p. 44
New York Times
5 Nov 1937
p. 19
Variety
20 Oct 1937
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Leo McCarey Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Morris Stoloff
Mus dir
Mus comp
SOUND
Ed Bernds
Sd eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Awful Truth by Arthur Richman, (New York, 18 Sep 1922).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"My Dreams Are Gone with the Wind," words and music by Ben Oakland and Milton Drake.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 October 1937
Production Date:
21 Jun-17 Aug 1937
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp. of California
15 October 1937
LP7497
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
89-90
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
3602
SYNOPSIS

Sophisticated New Yorkers Jerry and Lucy Warriner both have cause to suspect the other of having an affair, so they decide to divorce. Although Lucy wins custody of their dog, "Mr. Smith," the lack of a suitable male escort keeps her at home every night. Happily, Lucy's Aunt Patsy meets their neighbor, Oklahoma oil man Daniel Leeson, who is presentable and eligible, and introduces him to Lucy. While they are all getting acquainted, Jerry arrives for his custody visit with Mr. Smith, and his rowdy antics with the dog drive the others out of the apartment. By the end of the evening, Lucy and Daniel are infatuated. During the next few months, Jerry does everything he can to break up their engagement, but when Daniel's mother, who is adamantly against the engagement, spreads gossip about Lucy, Jerry leaps to her defense. Finally, because of a comedy of errors, Lucy and Daniel do separate, but in the meantime, Jerry has gotten involved with madcap heiress Barbara Vance. On the night before the final divorce decree, Lucy, posing as Jerry's sister, visits the Vance home, pretends to get drunk, parodies the ridiculous cabarat act of one of Jerry's former girlfriends, and behaves so obnoxiously that Jerry is forced to drive her home. Determined not to lose Jerry, Lucy tricks him up to Patsy's cabin, where they are reconciled just before the clock strikes ...

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Sophisticated New Yorkers Jerry and Lucy Warriner both have cause to suspect the other of having an affair, so they decide to divorce. Although Lucy wins custody of their dog, "Mr. Smith," the lack of a suitable male escort keeps her at home every night. Happily, Lucy's Aunt Patsy meets their neighbor, Oklahoma oil man Daniel Leeson, who is presentable and eligible, and introduces him to Lucy. While they are all getting acquainted, Jerry arrives for his custody visit with Mr. Smith, and his rowdy antics with the dog drive the others out of the apartment. By the end of the evening, Lucy and Daniel are infatuated. During the next few months, Jerry does everything he can to break up their engagement, but when Daniel's mother, who is adamantly against the engagement, spreads gossip about Lucy, Jerry leaps to her defense. Finally, because of a comedy of errors, Lucy and Daniel do separate, but in the meantime, Jerry has gotten involved with madcap heiress Barbara Vance. On the night before the final divorce decree, Lucy, posing as Jerry's sister, visits the Vance home, pretends to get drunk, parodies the ridiculous cabarat act of one of Jerry's former girlfriends, and behaves so obnoxiously that Jerry is forced to drive her home. Determined not to lose Jerry, Lucy tricks him up to Patsy's cabin, where they are reconciled just before the clock strikes midnight.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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