Night After Night (1932)

70 or 76 mins | Comedy-drama | 14 October 1932

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HISTORY

This was Mae West's first film and was George Raft's first starring role. HR noted on 23 Jun 1932 that shooting was delayed on this film while it was re-cast and re-written. According to the Paramount Script Collection at the AMPAS Library, in the first script of this film, dated 20 Jun 1932, David Burton is credited with direction, Elliot J. Clawson with screenplay, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz and William Slavens McNutt with dialogue. In a script dated 6 Aug 1932, they have been replaced by Archie Mayo (director) and Vincent Lawrence (screenplay). Nancy Carroll is listed as Raft's co-star in early scripts, and in the first white script, dated 15 Aug 1932, which also lists William Pawley as Leo. An early script included a prologue that showed "No. 55" as a new house in the 1890s, then showed it deteriorating into a speakeasy. The prologue was scheduled to be shot after the picture, but in the release dialogue script, dated 5 Oct 1932, it is reduced to a shot of the "55" house with a "SOLD" sign on it, followed by a FADEOUT, before a florist arrives and the main action of the movie ... More Less

This was Mae West's first film and was George Raft's first starring role. HR noted on 23 Jun 1932 that shooting was delayed on this film while it was re-cast and re-written. According to the Paramount Script Collection at the AMPAS Library, in the first script of this film, dated 20 Jun 1932, David Burton is credited with direction, Elliot J. Clawson with screenplay, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz and William Slavens McNutt with dialogue. In a script dated 6 Aug 1932, they have been replaced by Archie Mayo (director) and Vincent Lawrence (screenplay). Nancy Carroll is listed as Raft's co-star in early scripts, and in the first white script, dated 15 Aug 1932, which also lists William Pawley as Leo. An early script included a prologue that showed "No. 55" as a new house in the 1890s, then showed it deteriorating into a speakeasy. The prologue was scheduled to be shot after the picture, but in the release dialogue script, dated 5 Oct 1932, it is reduced to a shot of the "55" house with a "SOLD" sign on it, followed by a FADEOUT, before a florist arrives and the main action of the movie begins. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
29 Oct 32
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 32
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 32
p. 3.
International Photographer
Nov 32
p. 33.
Motion Picture Herald
8 Oct 32
p. 92.
New York Times
31 Oct 32
p. 18.
Variety
1 Nov 32
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Cam op
Asst cam
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Still photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the story "Single Night" by Louis Bromfield in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Jun 1932).
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 October 1932
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Publix Corp.
Copyright Date:
13 October 1932
Copyright Number:
LP3335
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70 or 76
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Ex-prizefighter Joe Anton owns the "55," a New York speakeasy that was once the Healy family mansion. Seeing Jerry Healy sitting alone in the club night after night, Joe becomes enamored of her and, resolving to get into a legitimate profession, dumps his girlfriend Iris Dawn and takes lessons in manners and "class" from the matronly Mabel Jellyman. Joe arranges to have dinner with Jerry, whom he calls "Miss Healy," but also invites Mrs. Jellyman to keep him from making a fool of himself. The dinner is interrupted by Maudie Triplett, Joe's old mistress, whose sharp wit and double-entendres embarrass Joe, but amuse the ladies. During a tour of the house, Iris pulls a gun on Jerry in Joe's bedroom, but Joe distracts her and saves Jerry, who kisses him and calls him the "pirate of the day." Meanwhile, mobster Frankie Guard wants to buy Joe's club because it is cutting into his own business, but Joe refuses to sell until he sees his chances with Jerry increase. He goes to Jerry's apartment to swear his love, but she tells him that she plans to marry the wealthy Dick Bolton, whom she does not love, to bolster her family's lost fortune. Calling Jerry "just another girl in a skirt," Joe leaves, disillusioned. That night, Frankie and his men arrive at the "55" to close the deal, but Joe reneges. In an attempt to deny her true feelings for Joe, Jerry arrives at the club and begins to wreck his bedroom, until he grabs her and kisses her. She rebuffs him until Frankie's mob arrives and starts shooting and she realizes that ... +


Ex-prizefighter Joe Anton owns the "55," a New York speakeasy that was once the Healy family mansion. Seeing Jerry Healy sitting alone in the club night after night, Joe becomes enamored of her and, resolving to get into a legitimate profession, dumps his girlfriend Iris Dawn and takes lessons in manners and "class" from the matronly Mabel Jellyman. Joe arranges to have dinner with Jerry, whom he calls "Miss Healy," but also invites Mrs. Jellyman to keep him from making a fool of himself. The dinner is interrupted by Maudie Triplett, Joe's old mistress, whose sharp wit and double-entendres embarrass Joe, but amuse the ladies. During a tour of the house, Iris pulls a gun on Jerry in Joe's bedroom, but Joe distracts her and saves Jerry, who kisses him and calls him the "pirate of the day." Meanwhile, mobster Frankie Guard wants to buy Joe's club because it is cutting into his own business, but Joe refuses to sell until he sees his chances with Jerry increase. He goes to Jerry's apartment to swear his love, but she tells him that she plans to marry the wealthy Dick Bolton, whom she does not love, to bolster her family's lost fortune. Calling Jerry "just another girl in a skirt," Joe leaves, disillusioned. That night, Frankie and his men arrive at the "55" to close the deal, but Joe reneges. In an attempt to deny her true feelings for Joe, Jerry arrives at the club and begins to wreck his bedroom, until he grabs her and kisses her. She rebuffs him until Frankie's mob arrives and starts shooting and she realizes that to save his life, she must admit her love. Finally the two embrace and Joe gives up his club to Frankie. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.