Mystery Liner (1934)

62 mins | Mystery | 15 March 1934

Director:

William Nigh

Writer:

Wellyn Totman

Cinematographer:

Archie Stout

Editor:

Carl Pierson

Production Company:

Monogram Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

Modern sources credit Abe Meyer as musical director of the picture, and state that the sound system was Western Electric by J. R. Balsley & Joe Phillips . ...

More Less

Modern sources credit Abe Meyer as musical director of the picture, and state that the sound system was Western Electric by J. R. Balsley & Joe Phillips .

Less

PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Mar 1934. DV 20 Dec 1933
p. 3
Film Daily
28 Feb 1934
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 1934
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
5 Mar 1934
p. 6
Motion Picture Herald
31 Mar 1934
p. 54
Variety
10 Apr 1934
p. 13
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Trem Carr, Vice-president in charge of production; A Paul Malvern Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
John Stransky Jr.
Rec
PRODUCTION MISC
E. R. Hickson
Tech dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Ghost of John Holling" by Edgar Wallace in The Saturday Evening Post (8 Mar 1924).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 March 1934
Production Date:
completed 20 Dec 1933
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Monogram Pictures Corp.
15 April 1934
LP4778
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

The day before the ocean liner Guthrie is to sail on an experimental voyage, Captain Holling, who has been suffering from an exotic mental disorder, is declared unfit for duty by shipowner Watson and ordered ashore. Before Chief Mate Downey assumes command, he and First Officer Cliff Rogers learn about the mission and the "S-505," a radio tube device that will enable its inventor, Professor Grimson, to control the movements of the liner from shore. That night, after Grimson is strangled and almost killed, the leader of an enemy government sends an unseen agent to "keep an eye on" another agent already on board the Guthrie . In turn, Watson orders Major Pope, a private detective, to board the ship in order to investigate any suspicious passengers. After ship physician Dr. Howard reveals that Holling was poisoned with a tropical drug, Pope begins to question Downey and Cliff. News of Holling's mysterious appearance in the cabin of elderly Mrs. Plimpton is echoed by the suspicious movements of German passenger Von Kessling. Hours before the S-505 test, Downey is killed as he tries to send a televised message to Watson on shore. As Pope questions Cliff and Von Kessling about Downey's murder, nurse Lila Kane reveals that Downey had stolen a library book about voodoo medicine, implicating him in Holling's poisoning. During the scheduled S-505 demonstration, Grimson extinguishes the ship's lights, and in the darkness, the S-505 is stolen, the ship is immobilized, and Mrs. Plimpton is terrorized by frantic fighting in her cabin. Once the lights are restored, Captain Holling steps out of a secret door in ...

More Less

The day before the ocean liner Guthrie is to sail on an experimental voyage, Captain Holling, who has been suffering from an exotic mental disorder, is declared unfit for duty by shipowner Watson and ordered ashore. Before Chief Mate Downey assumes command, he and First Officer Cliff Rogers learn about the mission and the "S-505," a radio tube device that will enable its inventor, Professor Grimson, to control the movements of the liner from shore. That night, after Grimson is strangled and almost killed, the leader of an enemy government sends an unseen agent to "keep an eye on" another agent already on board the Guthrie . In turn, Watson orders Major Pope, a private detective, to board the ship in order to investigate any suspicious passengers. After ship physician Dr. Howard reveals that Holling was poisoned with a tropical drug, Pope begins to question Downey and Cliff. News of Holling's mysterious appearance in the cabin of elderly Mrs. Plimpton is echoed by the suspicious movements of German passenger Von Kessling. Hours before the S-505 test, Downey is killed as he tries to send a televised message to Watson on shore. As Pope questions Cliff and Von Kessling about Downey's murder, nurse Lila Kane reveals that Downey had stolen a library book about voodoo medicine, implicating him in Holling's poisoning. During the scheduled S-505 demonstration, Grimson extinguishes the ship's lights, and in the darkness, the S-505 is stolen, the ship is immobilized, and Mrs. Plimpton is terrorized by frantic fighting in her cabin. Once the lights are restored, Captain Holling steps out of a secret door in Mrs. Plimpton's cabin and discloses that he and agent Von Kessling were tracking down Major Pope, the real murderous agent, who is then arrested.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Casablanca

In the onscreen credits, actor S. Z. Sakall's name is incorrectly spelled "S. K. Sakall." HR news items add the following information about the production: Warner ... >>

What Happened on Twenty-Third Street, New York City

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: "A winner and sure to please. In front of one of the largest newspaper offices is a hot air shaft through ... >>

Another Job for the Undertaker

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: “Shows a bedroom in a hotel. On the wall of the room is a conspicuous sign 'Don't blow out the gas.' ... >>

Sunset Blvd.

The film's working title was A Can of Beans. Although most contemporary and modern sources refer to the film as Sunset Boulevard, the opening title ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.