The Great Garrick (1937)

95 mins | Comedy | 30 October 1937

Director:

James Whale

Writer:

Ernest Vajda

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

Warren Low

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Var gives the running time at the film's preview in Hollywood as 82 min. Brian Ahern later married Olivia De Havilland's sister Joan Fontaine. This was Albert van Dekker's film debut. He later changed his name to Albert Dekker. According to modern sources, the film did poor business despite favorable ... More Less

Var gives the running time at the film's preview in Hollywood as 82 min. Brian Ahern later married Olivia De Havilland's sister Joan Fontaine. This was Albert van Dekker's film debut. He later changed his name to Albert Dekker. According to modern sources, the film did poor business despite favorable reviews. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
28 Sep 37
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
27 Sep 37
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
31 Jul 37
p. 44.
Motion Picture Herald
2 Oct 37
p. 32.
New York Times
25 Oct 37
p. 23.
Variety
29 Sep 37
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A James Whale Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Cont to scr const and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus and arr
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod asst
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Ladies and Gentlemen by Ernest Vajda (London, 18 May 1937).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Ladies and Gentlemen
Release Date:
30 October 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 October 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7514
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
sepia
Duration(in mins):
95
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3496
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Before David Garrick, the famous eighteenth century English actor, is to make a guest appearance at the Comédie Française , the French actors hear rumours that he has said he will teach them the art of realistic acting. Determined to teach him a lesson, they take over a roadside inn. When Garrick arrives at the Adam & Eve Inn, however, he instantly recognizes the staff and guests of the inn as actors by their conventional gestures, and decides to play along to see what will happen. During dinner, an attractive young woman arrives at the inn and when the innkeeper tries to send her away because the inn is full, Garrick, thinking this is all part of the joke, offers to give up his room and bunk with Tubby, his servant. While the actors continue to stage duels and mad scenes designed to frighten Garrick, he flirts outrageously with the woman, Germaine. She, however, is not one of the actors, but a runaway countess and she is swept off her feet by his attentions. Finally, Garrick turns one of their tricks against the actors, and after they realize that he knows what they are doing, he attacks their stilted acting styles. He is especially harsh with Germaine. Impressed, the actors insist that he come to Paris after all. Once in Paris, he looks for Germaine, and finds out for the first time that she is not one of the troupe. Upset because he thought real life was bad acting, Garrick refuses to perform until he finds her. Happily, Germaine is in the audience and smiles her forgiveness from the boxes. ... +


Before David Garrick, the famous eighteenth century English actor, is to make a guest appearance at the Comédie Française , the French actors hear rumours that he has said he will teach them the art of realistic acting. Determined to teach him a lesson, they take over a roadside inn. When Garrick arrives at the Adam & Eve Inn, however, he instantly recognizes the staff and guests of the inn as actors by their conventional gestures, and decides to play along to see what will happen. During dinner, an attractive young woman arrives at the inn and when the innkeeper tries to send her away because the inn is full, Garrick, thinking this is all part of the joke, offers to give up his room and bunk with Tubby, his servant. While the actors continue to stage duels and mad scenes designed to frighten Garrick, he flirts outrageously with the woman, Germaine. She, however, is not one of the actors, but a runaway countess and she is swept off her feet by his attentions. Finally, Garrick turns one of their tricks against the actors, and after they realize that he knows what they are doing, he attacks their stilted acting styles. He is especially harsh with Germaine. Impressed, the actors insist that he come to Paris after all. Once in Paris, he looks for Germaine, and finds out for the first time that she is not one of the troupe. Upset because he thought real life was bad acting, Garrick refuses to perform until he finds her. Happily, Germaine is in the audience and smiles her forgiveness from the boxes. Garrick then goes on to present a brilliant performance of Don Juan . +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.