The Florentine Dagger (1935)

69-70 mins | Mystery | 30 March 1935

Director:

Robert Florey

Writer:

Tom Reed

Producer:

Harry Joe Brown

Cinematographer:

Arthur L. Todd

Editor:

Thomas Pratt

Production Designers:

Anton Grot, Carl Jules Weyl

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Dec 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
26 Apr 35
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 35
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
8 Mar 35
p. 12.
Motion Picture Herald
26 Jan 35
p. 54.
Motion Picture Herald
4 May 35
p. 38.
New York Times
27 Apr 35
p. 20.
Variety
1 May 35
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Clue Club Picture
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Scr
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Florentine Dagger by Ben Hecht (New York, 1928).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 March 1935
Production Date:
began 20 December 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 April 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5440
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69-70
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
613
SYNOPSIS

Three strangers, Victor Ballau, a Viennese theatrical producer, Dr. Gerard Lytton, a British doctor lately of Vienna; and Juan Casare, an Italian from Rome, arrive in a city that is overlooked by the castle of the Borgias. As the last of the Borgias, Juan is convinced that his family's bad blood will drive him to murder and tries to kill himself with poison. He is interrupted by Lytton, who reveals that the pharmacist from whom he obtained the poison substituted salt for poison. Lytton begs Juan to return with him to Vienna to write a play about the Borgias as a cure for his obsession. Juan does write the play, and Ballau agrees to produce it, but they cannot find an actress to play Lucretia, until Ballau's daughter Florence returns home. The play is a success and Juan falls in love with Florence. When he asks for her hand, however, Victor refuses his permission, reminding Juan of what happened in Italy. Depressed, Juan spends the evening drinking. He returns to the theater only to find that Florence has been called home in the middle of the play. Juan hurries to Ballau's house and finds him dead, stabbed with one of three Florentine daggers once owned by the Borgias. At first Juan thinks that he killed Ballau in a drunken moment. Then suspicion falls on Florence, although she appears to have no motive. Juan begs the doctor to help prove her innocence. They trace Florence to a mask shop. There, they find out that she was not Ballau's daughter, but his stepdaughter and that her mother, an actress who supposedly burned to ... +


Three strangers, Victor Ballau, a Viennese theatrical producer, Dr. Gerard Lytton, a British doctor lately of Vienna; and Juan Casare, an Italian from Rome, arrive in a city that is overlooked by the castle of the Borgias. As the last of the Borgias, Juan is convinced that his family's bad blood will drive him to murder and tries to kill himself with poison. He is interrupted by Lytton, who reveals that the pharmacist from whom he obtained the poison substituted salt for poison. Lytton begs Juan to return with him to Vienna to write a play about the Borgias as a cure for his obsession. Juan does write the play, and Ballau agrees to produce it, but they cannot find an actress to play Lucretia, until Ballau's daughter Florence returns home. The play is a success and Juan falls in love with Florence. When he asks for her hand, however, Victor refuses his permission, reminding Juan of what happened in Italy. Depressed, Juan spends the evening drinking. He returns to the theater only to find that Florence has been called home in the middle of the play. Juan hurries to Ballau's house and finds him dead, stabbed with one of three Florentine daggers once owned by the Borgias. At first Juan thinks that he killed Ballau in a drunken moment. Then suspicion falls on Florence, although she appears to have no motive. Juan begs the doctor to help prove her innocence. They trace Florence to a mask shop. There, they find out that she was not Ballau's daughter, but his stepdaughter and that her mother, an actress who supposedly burned to death in a fire, is actually alive. Her badly scarred face covered by a lifelike mask, she worked as Ballau's housekeeper, Teresa, and killed him to save her daughter from his advances. Believing that she has suffered enough, Juan and Florence escape with her to Italy. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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