Come and Get It (1936)

98-99 mins | Drama | 6 November 1936

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HISTORY

A news item in DV in Jul 1935 noted that producer Samuel Goldwyn was negotiating with author Edna Ferber for the rights to her novel Come and Get It , but negotiations were temporarily snagged because Ferber refused to sell the story without retaining television rights. The news item also noted: "Though the television around the corner subject has been rife for some time, this is thought to be the first occasion where the inclusion of sight-radio rights have held up the sale of a novel to the screen." Other contemporary news items note that Miriam Hopkins was the first choice to play the lead, followed by Virginia Bruce, whom Goldwyn was attempting to borrow from M-G-M; tennis star Francis X. "Frank" Shields made his acting debut in the picture; portions of the film were shot on location in Northern Idaho; and a logging short was made to accompany the film. According to production charts and news items in DV and HR , when shooting began on the picture in late Jun 1936, Howard Hawks was the sole director. In mid-Aug 1936, Hawks left the picture over what an HR news item termed "a story dispute" with Goldwyn. Shooting resumed with a revised script on 19 Aug, under the direction of William Wyler, and continued until late Sep 1936. According to a HR news item on 26 Sep 1936, Goldwyn had determined to give full director credit to Wyler who had shot "half" of the picture, however, the onscreen credits of the released film include director credit for both Wyler and Hawks. Some modern sources ... More Less

A news item in DV in Jul 1935 noted that producer Samuel Goldwyn was negotiating with author Edna Ferber for the rights to her novel Come and Get It , but negotiations were temporarily snagged because Ferber refused to sell the story without retaining television rights. The news item also noted: "Though the television around the corner subject has been rife for some time, this is thought to be the first occasion where the inclusion of sight-radio rights have held up the sale of a novel to the screen." Other contemporary news items note that Miriam Hopkins was the first choice to play the lead, followed by Virginia Bruce, whom Goldwyn was attempting to borrow from M-G-M; tennis star Francis X. "Frank" Shields made his acting debut in the picture; portions of the film were shot on location in Northern Idaho; and a logging short was made to accompany the film. According to production charts and news items in DV and HR , when shooting began on the picture in late Jun 1936, Howard Hawks was the sole director. In mid-Aug 1936, Hawks left the picture over what an HR news item termed "a story dispute" with Goldwyn. Shooting resumed with a revised script on 19 Aug, under the direction of William Wyler, and continued until late Sep 1936. According to a HR news item on 26 Sep 1936, Goldwyn had determined to give full director credit to Wyler who had shot "half" of the picture, however, the onscreen credits of the released film include director credit for both Wyler and Hawks. Some modern sources have indicated that Wyler worked on the picture for about one week, however, news items and production charts in HR indicate that Wyler worked on the film for at least four weeks. Modern sources add that Wyler did not want to work on the film but was forced to take on the assignment after being threatened with legal action by Goldwyn; Wyler then attempted to shoot the film as closely as possible to Hawk's original design. Modern sources also note that at one time Spencer Tracy was wanted for the lead and that Edna Ferber was hired as a consultant for the film.
       The world premiere of the film was held at the Liberty Theatre in Seattle, where actress Frances Farmer had once worked as an usherette. Farmer made a personal appearance at the premiere. Events surrounding the making of Come and Get It and the Seattle premiere were dramatized in the 1982 biographical film Frances , starring Jessica Lange, and the 1983 television movie Will There Really Be a Morning? , starring Susan Blakely, and based on Farmer's autobiography. Farmer was borrowed from Paramount for Come and Get It , which was her first starring role. She continued to act in films until 1942, when personal problems and confinement in a mental hospital resulted in the end of her career. She made one additional film in the 1950s, Party Crashers (1958), and also appeared on television before her death in 1970. In interviews, director Hawks said that Farmer was the best actress with whom he ever worked, and modern critics have called Come and Get It her best film.
       Actor Walter Brennan won the first of his three Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor for this film. Modern sources include the following additional cast members: Stanley Blystone, Constantine Romanoff, Harry Tenbrook and Max Wagner ( Lumberjacks ); Lee Shumway ( Diner ); George Humbert ( Headwaiter ); Egon Brecher ( Schwerke ); William Wagner ( Wine steward ); Bud Jamison ( Man in saloon ); and Fred Warren ( Pianist ). Edward Arnold recreated his role for a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 15 Nov 1937. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Jul 35
p. 1.
Daily Variety
4 Dec 35
p. 1.
Daily Variety
26 Dec 35
p. 1.
Daily Variety
27 Oct 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Oct 36
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 36
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 36
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 36
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Sep 36
p. 1, 3
Hollywood Reporter
10 Nov 36
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 36
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
28 Oct 36
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Apr 36
p. 45.
Motion Picture Herald
1 Aug 36
p. 45.
Motion Picture Herald
7 Nov 36
p. 54.
MPSI
Jan 37
p. 12.
New York Times
12 Nov 36
p. 31.
Variety
18 Nov 36
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Logging seq dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Spec effs photog
Spec effs photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
Cost suppliers
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Wigs
PRODUCTION MISC
Snow-maker
Still photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Come and Get It by Edna Ferber (New York, 1935).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Aura Lee," words by W. W. Fosdick, music by George R. Poulton.
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 November 1936
Premiere Information:
Seattle premiere: 6 November 1936
Production Date:
21 June--late September 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Samuel Goldwyn
Copyright Date:
21 November 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6717
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
98-99
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
2793
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Barney Glasgow, the affable manager of a logging camp, is overjoyed that his men have done a good job this year. His commission means that he can go home and marry Emma Louise, his boss's daughter, and make a success of himself. Celebrating after the season, he and his friend Swan Bostrom go to a saloon where they are impressed by the singing and demeanor of Lotta Morgan. Lotta and Barney fall in love, but Barney cannot bring himself to give up his goal of wealth for love, and he leaves her. She then marries Swan, whom she regards as the kindest man in the world. Many years later, Barney has married Emma and has two grown children, Evvie and Richard. His only happiness comes from the feisty Evvie, who convinces him to visit Swan, whom he has not seen for several years. When Barney arrives at Swan's home, Lotta has been dead for some time, but her daughter, also named Lotta, is as beautiful as she. Barney becomes infatuated with the girl, who innocently thinks that Barney regards her as a daughter. He showers her and her cousin Karie with gifts, then brings them and Swan back to his home town, where he offers Swan a meaningless job. Because the town begins to gossip about Barney and Lotta, Richard goes to her home to confront her. They argue, but when she realizes that Barney's affection for her is not paternal, she and Richard become friends and soon fall in love. Meanwhile, Barney is upset to learn that Evvie plans to marry Tony Schwerke, a "beau hunk" who is a unionizer at ... +


Barney Glasgow, the affable manager of a logging camp, is overjoyed that his men have done a good job this year. His commission means that he can go home and marry Emma Louise, his boss's daughter, and make a success of himself. Celebrating after the season, he and his friend Swan Bostrom go to a saloon where they are impressed by the singing and demeanor of Lotta Morgan. Lotta and Barney fall in love, but Barney cannot bring himself to give up his goal of wealth for love, and he leaves her. She then marries Swan, whom she regards as the kindest man in the world. Many years later, Barney has married Emma and has two grown children, Evvie and Richard. His only happiness comes from the feisty Evvie, who convinces him to visit Swan, whom he has not seen for several years. When Barney arrives at Swan's home, Lotta has been dead for some time, but her daughter, also named Lotta, is as beautiful as she. Barney becomes infatuated with the girl, who innocently thinks that Barney regards her as a daughter. He showers her and her cousin Karie with gifts, then brings them and Swan back to his home town, where he offers Swan a meaningless job. Because the town begins to gossip about Barney and Lotta, Richard goes to her home to confront her. They argue, but when she realizes that Barney's affection for her is not paternal, she and Richard become friends and soon fall in love. Meanwhile, Barney is upset to learn that Evvie plans to marry Tony Schwerke, a "beau hunk" who is a unionizer at Barney's factory and has invented a new, disposable paper cup with Richard. Barney also quarrels with Richard when he discovers that he and Lotta have been seeing each other, and arranges to have him sent to the family's New York factory. At a company party at Barney's house, Richard and his father again quarrel over Lotta and almost come to blows when Lotta warns Richard not to hurt Barney because he is an old man. Hurt and ashamed, Barney stands idly by as Richard and Lotta walk out of his life. Now alone, Barney is comforted by Emma, who tells him that she is glad that it is Richard who has gone away because she was worried that it might have been Barney. Barney then rings the dinner chime and calls out "Come and get it," with tears in his eyes. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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