The Lady in Question (1940)

78 mins | Melodrama | 7 August 1940

Director:

Charles Vidor

Producer:

B. B. Kahane

Cinematographer:

Lucien Andriot

Editor:

Al Clark

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Gribouille and It Happened In Paris . The French film Gribouille , written by Marcel Achard, was released by Columbia in the U. S. in 1939 as Heart of Paris ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Gribouille and It Happened In Paris . The French film Gribouille , written by Marcel Achard, was released by Columbia in the U. S. in 1939 as Heart of Paris . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
11 Dec 40
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 40
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 40
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
16 Dec 40
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Aug 40
pp. 28-33.
New York Times
10 Dec 40
p. 33.
Variety
7 Aug 40
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the French film Gribouille written by Marcel Achard (A.C.E., 1937).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
It Happened In Paris
Gribouille
Release Date:
7 August 1940
Production Date:
16 May--22 June 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
19 August 1940
Copyright Number:
LP9848
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrorphonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6402
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Andre Morestan, the blustery, good-natured owner of a Parisian bicycle shop, is called to jury duty and becomes so moved by Natalie Roguin, the pathetic girl accused of murdering her lover, that he holds out for a verdict of not guilty. Once Natalie is acquitted, Andre offers her a job and takes her into his home on the pretext that she is the daughter of an old classmate. Complications arise when Andre's wife Michele becomes suspicious of his story and his son Pierre recognizes Natalie and suspects her of having an affair with his father. Soon, Natalie overcomes Pierre's misgivings, however, and the two fall in love. Trouble comes to the lovers in the form of Robert La Coste, the fiancé of Andre's daughter François, who discovers Natalie's true identity and begins to make advances towards her. To prevent more trouble, Natalie vows to leave the Morestan house and Pierre decides to rob his father's till so that he can run away with her. When Andre discovers the robbery, he accuses Natalie of being guilty all along, strikes her with a ceramic figurine and orders her from the house. Convinced by Henri Lurette, a fellow juror on the case, Andre goes to the President of the Court to argue for a miscarriage of justice but before he starts to offer his information, the judge congratulates him for his courage as a juror and relates that new evidence has been found conclusively proving Natalie's innocence. Andre then contritely returns home to welcome Natalie into his ... +


Andre Morestan, the blustery, good-natured owner of a Parisian bicycle shop, is called to jury duty and becomes so moved by Natalie Roguin, the pathetic girl accused of murdering her lover, that he holds out for a verdict of not guilty. Once Natalie is acquitted, Andre offers her a job and takes her into his home on the pretext that she is the daughter of an old classmate. Complications arise when Andre's wife Michele becomes suspicious of his story and his son Pierre recognizes Natalie and suspects her of having an affair with his father. Soon, Natalie overcomes Pierre's misgivings, however, and the two fall in love. Trouble comes to the lovers in the form of Robert La Coste, the fiancé of Andre's daughter François, who discovers Natalie's true identity and begins to make advances towards her. To prevent more trouble, Natalie vows to leave the Morestan house and Pierre decides to rob his father's till so that he can run away with her. When Andre discovers the robbery, he accuses Natalie of being guilty all along, strikes her with a ceramic figurine and orders her from the house. Convinced by Henri Lurette, a fellow juror on the case, Andre goes to the President of the Court to argue for a miscarriage of justice but before he starts to offer his information, the judge congratulates him for his courage as a juror and relates that new evidence has been found conclusively proving Natalie's innocence. Andre then contritely returns home to welcome Natalie into his family. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.