Arizona (1940)

125 or 127 mins | Western | 25 December 1940

Director:

Wesley Ruggles

Writer:

Claude Binyon

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Clarence Budington Kelland's novel was serialized in SEP from 25 Feb-15 Apr 1939. According to news items in HR, Gary Cooper, Joel McCrea and James Stewart were considered for the lead in this picture. The film was shot on location in Tucson, AZ at the Old Tucson Studios. According to a news item in HR, Chief Fighting Bear, who served as technical advisor on the film, was head of the Black River Apaches. NYT notes that Wesley Ruggles began to build his sets in the fall of 1939, but the war halted production until 1940. A news item in HR, however, notes that Ruggles canceled production on the film in Sep 1939 when Columbia threatened to slash the budget. The picture received Academy Award nominations in the Art Direction (Black-and-White) and Music (Original Score) categories. ...

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Clarence Budington Kelland's novel was serialized in SEP from 25 Feb-15 Apr 1939. According to news items in HR, Gary Cooper, Joel McCrea and James Stewart were considered for the lead in this picture. The film was shot on location in Tucson, AZ at the Old Tucson Studios. According to a news item in HR, Chief Fighting Bear, who served as technical advisor on the film, was head of the Black River Apaches. NYT notes that Wesley Ruggles began to build his sets in the fall of 1939, but the war halted production until 1940. A news item in HR, however, notes that Ruggles canceled production on the film in Sep 1939 when Columbia threatened to slash the budget. The picture received Academy Award nominations in the Art Direction (Black-and-White) and Music (Original Score) categories.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Corporate note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1940
p. 3
Film Daily
20 Nov 1940
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1939
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1940
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 1940
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 1940
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 1940
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 1940
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1940
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1940
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 1940
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
19 Nov 1940
p. 1, 3
Motion Picture Herald
23 Nov 1940
p. 45
New York Times
7 Feb 1941
p. 23
New York Times
19 Jan 1941
---
Variety
20 Nov 1940
p. 16
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Griff Barnette
Patrick Moriarty
Lieutenant George Blagoli
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Bud Brill
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog interiors
Dir of photog exteriors
Dir of photog exteriors
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Miss Arthur's cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd rec
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Arizona by Clarence Budington Kelland (New York, 1939) .
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 December 1940
Premiere Information:
Arizona premiere: 15 Nov 1940
Production Date:
5 Apr--27 Jul 1940 at Old Tucson Studios, Tucson, AZ
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
29 November 1940
LP10087
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrorphonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
125 or 127
Length(in reels):
14
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6272
SYNOPSIS

In the 1860's, Phoebe Titus, the only American woman living in the territory of Arizona, is possessed with a dream of owning the biggest ranch in the territory. Phoebe is also possessed with an indomitable spirit, which puts her into conflict with the corrupt Lazarus Ward, who runs Tucson and owns the only freight line that supplies the town. One day, while at Solomon Warner's general store to purchase supplies for her pie business, Phoebe suggests that Solomon become her partner in a freight business, which would challenge the exorbitant rates charged by Ward. Phoebe offers Peter Muncie, a restless adventurer to whom she has taken a liking, the job of managing the line, but Peter declines, telling Phoebe that he is headed for California but will return to her. Phoebe's line prospers until the calvalry is called out of the territory to defend the Union, thus creating a state of fear which is exploited by the newly arrived Jefferson Carteret. While masquerading as a concerned citizen, the ruthless Carteret secretly becomes the power behind Ward. To put Phoebe out of business, Carteret offers the Indian chief Mano guns to attack her wagons. Carteret's plan works and lawlessness rules the territory until the Union soldiers return, accompanied by Sergeant Peter Muncie. Peter senses something strange about Carteret, but Phoebe ignores his warnings and asks Peter to intercede with his Colonel to win her a freight contract with the army. With the $15,000 that she is awarded for the contract, Phoebe plans to send Peter to Nebraska to purchase the cattle to make her dream of a ranch come true. On the night that Phoebe ...

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In the 1860's, Phoebe Titus, the only American woman living in the territory of Arizona, is possessed with a dream of owning the biggest ranch in the territory. Phoebe is also possessed with an indomitable spirit, which puts her into conflict with the corrupt Lazarus Ward, who runs Tucson and owns the only freight line that supplies the town. One day, while at Solomon Warner's general store to purchase supplies for her pie business, Phoebe suggests that Solomon become her partner in a freight business, which would challenge the exorbitant rates charged by Ward. Phoebe offers Peter Muncie, a restless adventurer to whom she has taken a liking, the job of managing the line, but Peter declines, telling Phoebe that he is headed for California but will return to her. Phoebe's line prospers until the calvalry is called out of the territory to defend the Union, thus creating a state of fear which is exploited by the newly arrived Jefferson Carteret. While masquerading as a concerned citizen, the ruthless Carteret secretly becomes the power behind Ward. To put Phoebe out of business, Carteret offers the Indian chief Mano guns to attack her wagons. Carteret's plan works and lawlessness rules the territory until the Union soldiers return, accompanied by Sergeant Peter Muncie. Peter senses something strange about Carteret, but Phoebe ignores his warnings and asks Peter to intercede with his Colonel to win her a freight contract with the army. With the $15,000 that she is awarded for the contract, Phoebe plans to send Peter to Nebraska to purchase the cattle to make her dream of a ranch come true. On the night that Phoebe is paid, however, Carteret's men rob her, and the next day Carteret offers to lend her the funds if she will put up her freight line and ranch as security. Phoebe agrees, and on the day that Carteret notifies Phoebe that he is foreclosing on her mortgage, Peter returns with the herd of cattle. Peter swears that he will eliminate Carteret, but first he and Phoebe decide to marry. As the wedding ceremony begins, Carteret cleans his gun and after completing his vows, Peter finishes his business with Carteret and the newlyweds return to their ranch to build the future of Arizona.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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