Two Minutes to Play (1936)

61 or 69 mins | Comedy | 2 November 1936

Director:

Robert Hill

Cinematographer:

William Hyer

Editor:

Charles Henkel

Production Company:

Victory Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

According to a HR news item, members of the USC football team who did not go on a trip to play in Champaign, IL appeared in this film, scenes of which were shot at Bovard field at USC. MPH release charts list this film as having a running time of 61 minutes and a 2 Nov 1936 release, while reviews in Oct 1937, coinciding with a Brooklyn showing, list the running time as 69 minutes. ...

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According to a HR news item, members of the USC football team who did not go on a trip to play in Champaign, IL appeared in this film, scenes of which were shot at Bovard field at USC. MPH release charts list this film as having a running time of 61 minutes and a 2 Nov 1936 release, while reviews in Oct 1937, coinciding with a Brooklyn showing, list the running time as 69 minutes.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
16 Oct 1937
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1936
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 1936
p. 13
Variety
13 Oct 1937
p. 17
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 November 1936
Production Date:
began 5 Oct 1936
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
61 or 69
Length(in feet):
6,712
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2792
SYNOPSIS

Martin Granville, who works his way through Franklin College, has not joined the football team because of his father's disgrace thirty years earlier when he ran the wrong way to score a touchdown for the other team. When Coach Rodney, who needs a good quarterback, sees Marty throw a long pass, he asks attractive Pat Meredith, who likes both Marty and the captain of the team, Jack Gaines, to convince Marty to play. Marty and Pat plan to go to the junior prom together, but Jack ties Marty's tuxedo in knots and accompanies Pat, after she hangs up on Marty for making her wait. After they have made up, Pat encourages Marty to stay in school when he threatens to leave to earn money for his father to pay Jack's father, who has a lien on his mine. Marty gives Pat his fraternity pin, which she places in a box with many others that she has collected. After Marty joins the team, he accepts the coach's castigation when Jack runs a different play than the one the coach called. Meanwhile, roadhouse owner Lew Ashley schemes with his companion, Fluff Harding, to have Franklin lose so that they can win money betting. The night before the last game, Jack gives Pat his fraternity pin and accuses her of being nice to Marty only to get him to join the team. Marty overhears this and fights Jack. That night, Fluff gets Jack and Buzzy Vincent, the quarterback Jack replaced, drunk at Ashley's. Marty follows and starts a fight, then gets his teammates back to the dorm. He takes the blame when the coach finds ...

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Martin Granville, who works his way through Franklin College, has not joined the football team because of his father's disgrace thirty years earlier when he ran the wrong way to score a touchdown for the other team. When Coach Rodney, who needs a good quarterback, sees Marty throw a long pass, he asks attractive Pat Meredith, who likes both Marty and the captain of the team, Jack Gaines, to convince Marty to play. Marty and Pat plan to go to the junior prom together, but Jack ties Marty's tuxedo in knots and accompanies Pat, after she hangs up on Marty for making her wait. After they have made up, Pat encourages Marty to stay in school when he threatens to leave to earn money for his father to pay Jack's father, who has a lien on his mine. Marty gives Pat his fraternity pin, which she places in a box with many others that she has collected. After Marty joins the team, he accepts the coach's castigation when Jack runs a different play than the one the coach called. Meanwhile, roadhouse owner Lew Ashley schemes with his companion, Fluff Harding, to have Franklin lose so that they can win money betting. The night before the last game, Jack gives Pat his fraternity pin and accuses her of being nice to Marty only to get him to join the team. Marty overhears this and fights Jack. That night, Fluff gets Jack and Buzzy Vincent, the quarterback Jack replaced, drunk at Ashley's. Marty follows and starts a fight, then gets his teammates back to the dorm. He takes the blame when the coach finds out, and he is suspended, but after Buzzy gets hurt with two minutes to play and Franklin losing 3-0, Buzzy confesses and the coach apologizes to Marty and sends him in. On the last play, Marty gets turned around and runs the wrong way, but near his own end zone, he turns back and throws a bomb to Jack, who scores. Jack invites Marty's family to dinner, and Pat marries Marty's friend Hank, who recently became a millionaire, leaving Jack and Marty to bend over and accept kicks in the rear from each other.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.