Cowboy from Brooklyn (1938)

80 mins | Western | 9 July 1938

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Writer:

Earl Baldwin

Cinematographer:

Arthur Edeson

Editor:

James Gibbon

Production Designer:

Esdras Hartley

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's working titles were Dude Rancher, Howdy Stranger and The Brooklyn Cowboy. Captain Rose's Amateur Hour was intended as a burlesque of the long running radio program Major Bowes' Original Amateur Hour, whose most famous discovery was Frank Sinatra. The film was remade by Warner Bros. in 1948 as Two Guys from Texas, directed by David Butler and starring Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson. ...

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The film's working titles were Dude Rancher, Howdy Stranger and The Brooklyn Cowboy. Captain Rose's Amateur Hour was intended as a burlesque of the long running radio program Major Bowes' Original Amateur Hour, whose most famous discovery was Frank Sinatra. The film was remade by Warner Bros. in 1948 as Two Guys from Texas, directed by David Butler and starring Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1938
p. 3
Film Daily
14 Jun 1938
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 1938
pp. 38-39
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 1938
pp. 12-13
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1938
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
6 Jun 1938
p. 6
Motion Picture Herald
19 Feb 1938
p. 40
Motion Picture Herald
11 Jun 1938
p. 35
New York Times
14 Jul 1938
p. 17
Variety
15 Jun 1938
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Cosmopolitan Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Lou Edelman
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch arr by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Howdy Stranger by Robert Sloane and Louis Pelletier, Jr. (New York, 14 Jan 1937).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
SONGS
"Cowboy from Brooklyn," music and lyrics by Harry Warren and Johnny Mercer; "I've Got a Heartful of Music," "I'll Dream of You Tonight" and "Ride, Tenderfoot, Ride," music and lyrics by Richard Whiting and Johnny Mercer.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Dude Rancher
Howdy Stranger
The Brooklyn Cowboy
Release Date:
9 July 1938
Production Date:
mid Jan--mid Feb 1938
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
18 May 1938
LP8143
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4037
SYNOPSIS

Singer Elly Jordan, a Brooklyn man who is terrified of animals, ends up broke along with his two musical partners at Hardy's Dude Ranch in Two Bits, Wyoming. The Hardys, Ma and Pop, daughter Jane and son Jeff, hire the men to play for the dudes. Sam Thorne, Jane's self-appointed boyfriend, ranch cowhand and amateur crooner, is jealous of Jane's interest in Elly. Elly is so successful as a cowboy singer, that when theatrical agent Ray Chadwick arrives at the ranch on a vacation and hears him, he signs Elly immediately. Chadwick thinks that Elly is a real cowboy and Jane coaches him to talk like one. In spite of his fear of animals, he gets away with the deception. He makes a successful screen test as a cowboy, using the name Wyoming Steve Gibson, but he and Chadwick, who now knows the truth, fear that the deception will be revealed when the movie people arrive in New York from Hollywood with Elly's contract. Meanwhile, Jane and some of the ranch people are traveling East as well so Sam can sing on Captain Rose's Amateur Hour in New York. Jane tells Sam that she is in love with Elly and Sam is so angry that when he isn't a big success on the show, he blurts out the truth about Elly's background. To prove that Elly is on the level, Chadwick and his assistant Pat Dunn suggest that he compete in a rodeo. They take Elly to Professor Landis, who hypnotizes him. Under hypnosis, Elly leaps on a horse, rides to Madison Square Garden, enters the bulldogging contest and sets a ...

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Singer Elly Jordan, a Brooklyn man who is terrified of animals, ends up broke along with his two musical partners at Hardy's Dude Ranch in Two Bits, Wyoming. The Hardys, Ma and Pop, daughter Jane and son Jeff, hire the men to play for the dudes. Sam Thorne, Jane's self-appointed boyfriend, ranch cowhand and amateur crooner, is jealous of Jane's interest in Elly. Elly is so successful as a cowboy singer, that when theatrical agent Ray Chadwick arrives at the ranch on a vacation and hears him, he signs Elly immediately. Chadwick thinks that Elly is a real cowboy and Jane coaches him to talk like one. In spite of his fear of animals, he gets away with the deception. He makes a successful screen test as a cowboy, using the name Wyoming Steve Gibson, but he and Chadwick, who now knows the truth, fear that the deception will be revealed when the movie people arrive in New York from Hollywood with Elly's contract. Meanwhile, Jane and some of the ranch people are traveling East as well so Sam can sing on Captain Rose's Amateur Hour in New York. Jane tells Sam that she is in love with Elly and Sam is so angry that when he isn't a big success on the show, he blurts out the truth about Elly's background. To prove that Elly is on the level, Chadwick and his assistant Pat Dunn suggest that he compete in a rodeo. They take Elly to Professor Landis, who hypnotizes him. Under hypnosis, Elly leaps on a horse, rides to Madison Square Garden, enters the bulldogging contest and sets a new record. He sneezes and wakes from the hypnosis, but the movie people are convinced that he is a real cowboy. He signs the contract and kisses Jane to seal the deal.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.