Go Chase Yourself (1938)

70 mins | Comedy | 22 April 1938

Director:

Edward F. Cline

Producer:

Robert Sisk

Cinematographer:

Jack MacKenzie

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Joe Penner received star billing for the first time in Go Chase Yourself, and Lucille Ball enjoyed her first leading role in the film. According to modern sources, Penner pushed RKO to cast Ball after he heard her on The Phil Baker Show, a popular radio program on which Ball had just become a regular featured performer. The contributing writers listed above were taken from a Feb 1938 credit sheet from SAB but were not included on Mar 1938 credit sheet, suggesting that they each contributed less than 10 percent to the final script. MPH's "In the Cutting Room" and HR news items add Vicki Lester, Otto Fries and William Franey as cast members, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. "I'm from the City," the title of the film's song, was also the title of Penner's next movie. Modern sources add the following cast members: Jack Green (Officer), Philip Morris (Policeman), John Ince (John Weatherby), Lynton Brent (Photographer), Clayton Moore, Alan Bruce and William Corson (Reporters), Napoleon Whiting (Porter), Donald Kerr (Gas station attendant), Bobs Watson (Junior), Diana Gibson and Rita Oehmen (Diners), Billy Dooley (Linesman), Edward Hearn (Raffle seller) and Chester Clute (Excited man). ...

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Joe Penner received star billing for the first time in Go Chase Yourself, and Lucille Ball enjoyed her first leading role in the film. According to modern sources, Penner pushed RKO to cast Ball after he heard her on The Phil Baker Show, a popular radio program on which Ball had just become a regular featured performer. The contributing writers listed above were taken from a Feb 1938 credit sheet from SAB but were not included on Mar 1938 credit sheet, suggesting that they each contributed less than 10 percent to the final script. MPH's "In the Cutting Room" and HR news items add Vicki Lester, Otto Fries and William Franey as cast members, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. "I'm from the City," the title of the film's song, was also the title of Penner's next movie. Modern sources add the following cast members: Jack Green (Officer), Philip Morris (Policeman), John Ince (John Weatherby), Lynton Brent (Photographer), Clayton Moore, Alan Bruce and William Corson (Reporters), Napoleon Whiting (Porter), Donald Kerr (Gas station attendant), Bobs Watson (Junior), Diana Gibson and Rita Oehmen (Diners), Billy Dooley (Linesman), Edward Hearn (Raffle seller) and Chester Clute (Excited man).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1938
p. 3
Film Daily
19 Apr 1938
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 1938
p. 3, 5
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1938
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
8 Apr 1938
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
15 Apr 1938
p. 8
Motion Picture Herald
12 Mar 1938
p. 35
Motion Picture Herald
16 Apr 1938
p. 36
New York Times
15 Jun 1938
p. 27
Variety
20 Apr 1938
p. 15
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 April 1938
Production Date:
21 Feb--mid Mar 1938
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
22 April 1938
LP7999
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4125
SYNOPSIS

After years of buying raffle tickets, meek and dim-witted bank teller Wilbur P. Meeley finally wins a prize--a new recreational trailer. Although Wilbur is too poor to own a car, he nonetheless pulls the trailer to his home, where he is met with disdain by Carol, his ever-practical wife. That night, three bandits, Nails, Ice-Box and Frank, rob Wilbur's bank, aided by a tip that Wilbur unwittingly had given them earlier in the day. Pursued by police, the robbers drive to Wilbur's dead end street, where they spot Wilbur's trailer. Unaware that Wilbur is sleeping in it, the robbers hook the trailer to their car and take off in the guise of vacationers. The next morning, Wilbur wakes up and discovers that the trailer is camped alongside a deserted highway and that he is now the robbers' captive. Always the conscientious husband, Wilbur, who has become the police's primary robbery suspect, climbs a telephone pole and calls Carol to inform her of his general whereabouts. While Carol dashes to a train to find Wilbur before the police do, Wilbur meets debutante Judy Daniels, who is fleeing from her arranged marriage to Count Pierre Fontaine de Louis-Louis. After repairing Judy's car, Wilbur suggests to the robbers that they help the heiress, and the robbers, seeing a perfect opportunity for a kidnapping, agree. In the meantime, Carol meets the phony, wolfish Count Pierre on her train and, followed by the police, decides to use him as a decoy. Eventually, the police, Carol, Pierre, Judy and her family, and Wilbur and the robbers end up at the Daniels' estate. Carol helps Wilbur to escape with Judy and ...

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After years of buying raffle tickets, meek and dim-witted bank teller Wilbur P. Meeley finally wins a prize--a new recreational trailer. Although Wilbur is too poor to own a car, he nonetheless pulls the trailer to his home, where he is met with disdain by Carol, his ever-practical wife. That night, three bandits, Nails, Ice-Box and Frank, rob Wilbur's bank, aided by a tip that Wilbur unwittingly had given them earlier in the day. Pursued by police, the robbers drive to Wilbur's dead end street, where they spot Wilbur's trailer. Unaware that Wilbur is sleeping in it, the robbers hook the trailer to their car and take off in the guise of vacationers. The next morning, Wilbur wakes up and discovers that the trailer is camped alongside a deserted highway and that he is now the robbers' captive. Always the conscientious husband, Wilbur, who has become the police's primary robbery suspect, climbs a telephone pole and calls Carol to inform her of his general whereabouts. While Carol dashes to a train to find Wilbur before the police do, Wilbur meets debutante Judy Daniels, who is fleeing from her arranged marriage to Count Pierre Fontaine de Louis-Louis. After repairing Judy's car, Wilbur suggests to the robbers that they help the heiress, and the robbers, seeing a perfect opportunity for a kidnapping, agree. In the meantime, Carol meets the phony, wolfish Count Pierre on her train and, followed by the police, decides to use him as a decoy. Eventually, the police, Carol, Pierre, Judy and her family, and Wilbur and the robbers end up at the Daniels' estate. Carol helps Wilbur to escape with Judy and then is arrested with Pierre and thrown in jail. After Wilbur, who has delivered Judy to her kidnappers, mistakenly returns the suitcase with the bank robbery cash to the police, the location of the trailer is discovered when a roving radio broadcaster interviews Wilbur in the trailer. Chased by the police, the robbers, who have also taken Carol, Pierre and the jail warden prisoner, disconnect the trailer on a steep mountain road. Following a long and furious trip down the mountainside, the trailer finally lands in a bale of hay, and Wilbur is declared a hero by his bank boss and the police.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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