Follow the Band (1943)

60-61 mins | Musical comedy | 14 May 1943

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Trombone from Heaven . While performers Frances Langford and Leo Carrillo received top-billing in the film's opening credits, their appearences in Follow the Band are merely cameos. According to LAEx , Broadway musical comedy performer Michael Moore was to make his feature film debut in this picture, but his participation in the released film has not been ... More Less

The working title of this film was Trombone from Heaven . While performers Frances Langford and Leo Carrillo received top-billing in the film's opening credits, their appearences in Follow the Band are merely cameos. According to LAEx , Broadway musical comedy performer Michael Moore was to make his feature film debut in this picture, but his participation in the released film has not been confirmed. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 May 1943.
---
Daily Variety
23 Apr 43
p. 3.
Down Beat
1 Sep 43
p. 7.
Film Daily
3 May 43
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 43
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
23 Sep 1942.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Apr 43
p. 1241.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 May 43
p. 1290.
Variety
28 Apr 43
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Dir of sd
[Sd] tech
DANCE
Dance dir
STAND INS
Singing voice of Eddie Quillan
Singing voice of Eddie Quillan
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Trombone from Heaven" by Richard English in Collier's (26 Aug 1939).
SONGS
"My Melancholy Baby," words by George A. Norton, music by Ernie Burnett
"What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at Me For," words and music by Joseph McCarthy, Howard Johnson and James V. Monaco
"Ain't Misbehavin'," words by Andy Razaf, music by Fats Waller and Harry Brooks
+
SONGS
"My Melancholy Baby," words by George A. Norton, music by Ernie Burnett
"What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at Me For," words and music by Joseph McCarthy, Howard Johnson and James V. Monaco
"Ain't Misbehavin'," words by Andy Razaf, music by Fats Waller and Harry Brooks
"Rosie the Riveter," words and music by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb
"My Devotion," words and music by Roc Hillman and Johnny Napton
"Swingin' the Blues" and "Spellbound," words by Everett Carter, music by Milton Rosen
"Hilo Hattie," words and music by Harold Adamson and Johnny Noble
"The Army Air Corps Song," words and music by Robert Crawford
"Tail O' Me Coat," Irish traditional.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Trombone from Heaven
Release Date:
14 May 1943
Production Date:
4 February--late February 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
19 April 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12035
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60-61
Length(in feet):
5,476
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9234
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Marvin Howe is a hired hand at the Clover Leaf Dairy Farm in Rutledge, Vermont, who, much to the consternation of the dairy's owner, "Pop" Turnbull, spends most of his time practicing the trombone, not doing his chores. After Marvin and Pop's daughter Juanita announce their engagement, Tate Winters, Marvin's rival for Juanita's affections, convinces Pop to send Marvin to New York City to get Pop's dairy a membership in the National Dairymen's Association, knowing that Pop has been refused one repeatedly, as he raises goats, not cows. In New York, Jeremiah K. Barton, president of the Dairymen's Association, orders his secretary, Lucille Rose, to give Marvin "the brush off," but when she tells the farm boy that Barton will be in conference for a week, Marvin takes a room at a boardinghouse owned by a Mrs. Forbes. The landlady's son Skinnay offers Marvin a membership in his jazz band after hearing him play his trombone. Skinnay's friend Dolly O'Brien then convinces Marvin to take a job with the band at O'Brien's Rendevous, a nightclub owned by her uncle, Big Mike O'Brien. Marvin becomes a national sensation known as "The Hot Toot" when he knocks out "zoot suiter" gang leader Alphonse, who attempts to destroy the nightclub after being fired by Big Mike. Pop then takes Juanita to New York to show her how "the big city" has changed Marvin, and when she is misled to believe that Dolly is Marvin's new girl friend, Juanita breaks their engagement and goes back to Rutledge. At the same time, Barton and his associate, Peterson, offer Big Mike a national radio contract for Skinnay's band. Marvin ... +


Marvin Howe is a hired hand at the Clover Leaf Dairy Farm in Rutledge, Vermont, who, much to the consternation of the dairy's owner, "Pop" Turnbull, spends most of his time practicing the trombone, not doing his chores. After Marvin and Pop's daughter Juanita announce their engagement, Tate Winters, Marvin's rival for Juanita's affections, convinces Pop to send Marvin to New York City to get Pop's dairy a membership in the National Dairymen's Association, knowing that Pop has been refused one repeatedly, as he raises goats, not cows. In New York, Jeremiah K. Barton, president of the Dairymen's Association, orders his secretary, Lucille Rose, to give Marvin "the brush off," but when she tells the farm boy that Barton will be in conference for a week, Marvin takes a room at a boardinghouse owned by a Mrs. Forbes. The landlady's son Skinnay offers Marvin a membership in his jazz band after hearing him play his trombone. Skinnay's friend Dolly O'Brien then convinces Marvin to take a job with the band at O'Brien's Rendevous, a nightclub owned by her uncle, Big Mike O'Brien. Marvin becomes a national sensation known as "The Hot Toot" when he knocks out "zoot suiter" gang leader Alphonse, who attempts to destroy the nightclub after being fired by Big Mike. Pop then takes Juanita to New York to show her how "the big city" has changed Marvin, and when she is misled to believe that Dolly is Marvin's new girl friend, Juanita breaks their engagement and goes back to Rutledge. At the same time, Barton and his associate, Peterson, offer Big Mike a national radio contract for Skinnay's band. Marvin is so heartbroken, however, that he quits the band and returns to Rutledge as Juanita and Tate are about to be married. The band follows him there, and Dolly tells all to the bride-to-be. Marvin and Juanita are reunited just in time for the band to perform on its first coast-to-coast radio broadcast. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.