Footlight Glamour (1943)

68 mins | Comedy | 30 September 1943

Director:

Frank R. Strayer

Producer:

Frank R. Strayer

Cinematographer:

Philip Tannura

Editor:

Dick Fantl

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The above-listed onscreen credits may have been altered for re-release by King Features Syndicate. Although Philip Tannura is listed onscreen as director of photography, a 25 Jun 1943 HR production chart credits David Ragan as camerman. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry Blondie! in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

The above-listed onscreen credits may have been altered for re-release by King Features Syndicate. Although Philip Tannura is listed onscreen as director of photography, a 25 Jun 1943 HR production chart credits David Ragan as camerman. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry Blondie! in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.0391. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Oct 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 43
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
9 Oct 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Sep 43
p. 1531.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Oct 43
p. 1573.
Variety
10 Nov 43
p. 34.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the comic strip "Blondie" created by Chic Young, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (1930--).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
30 September 1943
Production Date:
24 June--17 July 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
30 September 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12308
Duration(in mins):
68
Length(in feet):
6,153
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Informed that a defense company plans to build a factory on the outskirts of town, developer J. C. Dithers erects fifty houses in the vicinity. After the plans are canceled, Dithers is stuck with his now worthless homes. When tool magnate Randolph Wheeler visits the office, Dithers' employee Dagwood Bumstead suggests that his boss persuade Wheeler to build a tool plant on the site. Preoccupied with personal problems, Wheeler confides to Dithers that he has come to town to rescue his daughter Vicki from the clutches of a fortune-hunting theater director named Jerry Grant. After Dithers proposes that Wheeler occupy himself by building a tool plant, the tool magnate becomes intrigued. Dithers then seals the deal by suggesting that Vicki stay with the Bumsteads while he and Wheeler go to inspect the site. When Dithers informs Dagwood of his plan, Dagwood, who has only seen a baby picture of Vicki, goes to the hotel to meet her, expecting to find a little girl. Dagwood is surprised to meet the adult Vicki, and Vicki, thinking that Dagwood is involved with the theater, agrees to accompany him home. At the Bumstead house, Vicki is disappointed to learn that Dagwood is only involved in remodeling a movie theater and therefore is not part of the legitimate theater world. When Blondie, Dagwood's wife, enthuses about her dream of becoming an actress, Vicki encourages her and enlists her in staging a play that she has authored. Soon, Mr. Crum, the mailman, and the Bumsteads' son Baby Dumpling join the production. Dagwood is furious until he learns that Cora, Dithers' wife, is sponsoring the play. After Cora marshals ... +


Informed that a defense company plans to build a factory on the outskirts of town, developer J. C. Dithers erects fifty houses in the vicinity. After the plans are canceled, Dithers is stuck with his now worthless homes. When tool magnate Randolph Wheeler visits the office, Dithers' employee Dagwood Bumstead suggests that his boss persuade Wheeler to build a tool plant on the site. Preoccupied with personal problems, Wheeler confides to Dithers that he has come to town to rescue his daughter Vicki from the clutches of a fortune-hunting theater director named Jerry Grant. After Dithers proposes that Wheeler occupy himself by building a tool plant, the tool magnate becomes intrigued. Dithers then seals the deal by suggesting that Vicki stay with the Bumsteads while he and Wheeler go to inspect the site. When Dithers informs Dagwood of his plan, Dagwood, who has only seen a baby picture of Vicki, goes to the hotel to meet her, expecting to find a little girl. Dagwood is surprised to meet the adult Vicki, and Vicki, thinking that Dagwood is involved with the theater, agrees to accompany him home. At the Bumstead house, Vicki is disappointed to learn that Dagwood is only involved in remodeling a movie theater and therefore is not part of the legitimate theater world. When Blondie, Dagwood's wife, enthuses about her dream of becoming an actress, Vicki encourages her and enlists her in staging a play that she has authored. Soon, Mr. Crum, the mailman, and the Bumsteads' son Baby Dumpling join the production. Dagwood is furious until he learns that Cora, Dithers' wife, is sponsoring the play. After Cora marshals Dagwood into playing the lead, Jerry offers to direct the play and moves in with the Bumsteads to facilitate rehearsals. Nearing completion of his project, Dithers phones Dagwood at the office and is dismayed to learn that Dagwood is immersed in rehearsals and that Vicki is involved with Jerry and the theater again. Fearful that Wheeler will cancel the deal if he learns the truth, Dithers speeds to the Bumstead house to stop the play. Upon discovering that his own wife is sponsoring the production and that the proceeds have been pledged to the U.S.O., Dithers resolves to keep Wheeler out of town for as long as possible. His plan fails, however, when Wheeler insists upon returning to the city immediately. On opening night, Dagwood falls through a trap door, Daisy, the Bumsteads' dog, makes an entrance on the train of Blondie's dress, and the actors miss their cues. After birds flutter out of Dagwood's rented magician's coat, the audience erupts in hysterics and Vicki pleads with Jerry to run away with her. After Jerry and Vicki flee the theater, Wheeler bursts in and announces that he is calling off his deal with Dithers. Unable to find Blondie, Dagwood thinks that she has run away with Jerry and follows them to the Bumstead house. When Dagwood confronts Jerry, Jerry boasts that his marriage will make him rich and offers Dagwood a share. Vicki overhears the conversation, and when Wheeler arrives and throws Jerry out of the house, Vicki renounces both Jerry and her acting aspirations. Blondie then joins Dagwood, and all ends happily when Wheeler announces that he has decided to build the plant. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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